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Discussions

Bass Bass Knows the way the wind is flowing.
  • Interesting Items from CES

    I effectively pay ~$20/mo for cable and HBO from FiOS. Something happened recently to make cable a lot cheaper, perhaps people don't give a crap anymore about TV. I know I don't.

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , wkempf wrote

    The same is true for web browsers. A single standard is good. A single implementation is not. End of story.

    A single standard is good. A single implementation is better. End of story.

     

     

    Just kidding. Nullius in verba. You see, I can actually justify my reasoning. A single implementation is better because software engineering is a non-marginal economic activity, that is, software only has to be written once and it can then be copied and used infinitely. It also is utilitarian, unlike art, it does not necessarily written to encode an individual's creative expression. This means it can be built on top of and improved, sometimes even by people who don't know each other.

    You see, when two software engineers work on the same exact thing it's actually a tragedy. Because really, one of them could have been on a beach drinking a Margarita and the human species wouldn't have been any worse off. Think of all the margaritas that went undrunk because of people like you.

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    Hell even Mac OS X is bundled with a metric ton of GPL code. And I clearly remember someone in MS Research saying they use GNU Emacs. :P

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    Oh, that's what you're talking about? LOL I though you were talking about their search engine. The thing that brings home the bacon. You know? What part of that is derived from GPL code?

    I suspect you didn't realize the Linux kernel was GPL based on your previous comment. I also suspect you don't understand how the GPL works. Here is a hint: you will never know what part of Google's search engine is derived from GPL code because they are under no obligation to tell you, they are free to use as much GPL code as they want with zero obligation to share anything. The GPL sharealike obligations only applies on external distribution. I suggest you read up more on licenses.

    Huge swaths of a typical Linux distribution are GPL by the way. Do you know what the GNU system is? It's probably the most common license. To say that Google doesn't use GPL code is just laughable.

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    What GPL software does Google use?

    This is the kind of question you should be embarrassed to ask. 

     

     

     

    (btw, the Linux kernel)

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

     no company with plans for revenue models other than by selling support would ever use GPL software.

    I don't understand how you can write this...

     

    So, where's the source code for Google's fine-tuned kernel?

    And follow up with this. Think cbae, think.

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    But arguably none of that code (that they didn't write) is what made iOS a massive success. First to market had a hell of lot more to do with it than the 25 year old kernel on which iOS is built.

    It's a pretty sophisticated kernel, and a lot of their low level user space is all open source. Actually I highly doubt Apple would even exist if it wasn't for open source, because their bootstrapping back when they were teetering on bankruptcy was very much based on leveraging open source. I think they owe their success even more so then Google does. In some bizarro world Google might be able to survive with Windows Servers or Solaris, they wouldn't be a mobile powerhouse though and their search engine would probably be a whole lot slower (FYI, Google tunes their stack from the kernel up).

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    Thought experiment time, to relate my point to .NET. Most of the .NET class libraries are CIL, therefore as a C# programmer you could in theory reimplement their functionality. Why don't you?

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , cbae wrote

    *snip*

    So your real complaint is that IE is a wheel that nobody else can customize. You really seem to have no problem with inventing new wheels per se.

    You can't build a car on wheels you aren't allowed to use.

  • Microsoft working on new Chrome-like browser

    , kettch wrote

    *snip*

    Yes, those companies benefited from the work of others and yet no one is complaining that they forked their parent codebase and went out on their own. Gecko is nothing like what Netscape was, likewise WebKit has gone pretty far from it's roots in KHTML. It will only be a matter of time before Blink and WebKit are significantly different. I don't see your point. You are arguing that nobody should ever invent anything new.

    I'm arguing that there is no business reason in reinventing anything new here. Literally, Microsoft does not benefit at all from maintaining a rendering engine from scratch.

    Yeah Microsoft is some big rich company that can waste resources on stupid crap, why not? Except this is exactly why they failed in mobile. If Google had to write Android from scratch we wouldn't be talking about it today because they wouldn't have been any faster in producing it then Microsoft was with their OS. The reason Google won the mobile war is because they didn't have to write the vast majority of Android. Apple too, their OS is full of code they didn't write. Maybe you can be smug about the fact that Microsoft is literally the only company still rubbing two sticks together to write software, but I just think it's sad in a "watching a train wreck" sort of way.