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Charles Charles Welcome Change
  • The CLR Compiler Geek Roundtable

    You'll see more customer/MS people interaction videos on C9 in the future.

    Glad you liked it!

    C
  • Phalanger: PHP .NET compiler revealed

    rhm wrote:
    Of course it's possible for the CLR to run any language at some level as it is a turing-complete machine even in verifyable mode. 


    ?
  • Phalanger: PHP .NET compiler revealed

    I can't talk about "Mono" but I can talk about the fact that Whidbey enables the emitting of pure IL from MC++ compilation...

    C
  • Phalanger: PHP .NET compiler revealed

    Nope. They made it possible to take existing PHP code (minus the unmanaged extensions, of course) and compile it to IL. The resulting code is Jitted and run on the managed heap. And it runs faster than the interpreted original. Why? Cuz it's compiled not interpeted.

    Check out their site and ask them questions and give them feedback!

    EDIT: From the authors' site:

    Our integration introduces the PHP language into the VS.NET in a specific project type supporting syntax highlighting and compilation. PHP files are compiled to .NET Framework executables and can be executed and even traced from the VS.NET environment using the generated debug information.

    To make script development and debugging more comfortable, the IntelliSense support for PHP projects and direct PHP variable insight may be added in future versions but this is not a priority for the current project. The VS.NET integration is rather some kind of add-on to the Phalanger.


    C
  • Phalanger: PHP .NET compiler revealed

    Compiling it to managed means that you can interoperate with other managed languages really naturally. So, you can take a PHP project and add new "modules" to it that you write in, say, C#, then import the C# dll into your Phalanger project, and compile.

    So, it's more than just performance (not to mention security), but, you are right, it was kind of a "let's see if we can do this" kind of thing (which many school projects are, initially) and they did! Smart kids (well, they look like kids to me).

    C

  • Mark Boulter - talking about Smart Clients and Windows Forms, Part II

    dantheman82 wrote:

    These videos required editing, I think.  He had 15-20 min. of material...


    Agreed. We will do a better job of editing where appropriate. In general, too much editing decreases the raw and honest realness that is becoming our trademark style. In other words, we want you to feel like the interview is happening while you watch it; live, but not live. Just real.

    dantheman82 wrote:

    A smart client needs to have a smart element which has learning or hides unimportant data from the user or does something useful like that.  It can really be done in any language (unmanaged or managed), and it ultimately has to be useful.


    Yes, I for one think that if an application has no facility for understanding my typical behaviors (associated with the specific application's functionality and my needs) and no capability for behavioral prediction of user actions, then the application is not very smart. Asynchronously detecting network connection state, checking remote data stores/email servers, synchronizing offline data caches, etc are not particularly smart actions, but they are certainly very useful. MSR is working on some very interesting applications that implement machine learning and AI, which in my assessment can legitimately be coined "Smart".
  • Mark Boulter - talking about Smart Clients and Windows Forms, Part II

    PerfectPhase wrote:
    staceyw wrote: Still no definition of Smart Client unless I missed it.  Seems it is another word for WinForm app to me.  If it is because it uses the network or port 80 then it should be WinForms Network Client.  WinForms clients have been clients in a client/server area for a long time so maybe just a new marketing term to refer to a WinForm client that in network enabled (i.e. WSE, Indigo, sockets, etc).


    Outlook 2003 is one of the best examples of a smart client I've seen.  The way it swiches seamless from online to offline and back is what makes it smart compared to a classic client/server where when the network connection to the server dies the app packs up and shuts down.

    Stephen.


    You are spot on. Outlook is THE prototypical example of a Smart Client. Keep in mind that Outlook is not a managed application. It's written entirely in unmanaged C++. So, is there really a connection between managed code and "Smart" client?
  • Mark Boulter - talking about Smart Clients and Windows Forms, Part II

    I need to stop saying "we'll probably need to cut this" since we don't edit! I'll work on that.

    Charles
  • Scott Guthrie - Talking ASP.NET and IIS 7.0

    It's important to realize that the ASP.NET team has been the greatest (and earliest) adopter of .NET inside our walls and are true champions of the CLR. Much kudos to the ASP.NET team for what they've done with CLR-based technology. The feedback they've pumped back to the CLR team since very early on has benefited all of us today.

    Can you guess how much of ASP.NET is written in C#? You'll find out in the second clip, but go ahead and guess.


    Thanks,

    Charles
  • Kevin Schofield - Tour of Microsoft Research, Part I (graphic and developer tool research)

    We just need to figure out how to use Scoble's nifty new camera. Sorry about the resolution problems of late. We'll figure it out.

    C