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Discussions

Craig Matthews Craig_​Matthews Good News, Everyone!
  • Windows 10 TP thoughts

    , magicalclick wrote

    *snip*
    Never heard of that strange rule. Worth a try regardless how silly it sound.

    Yeah,from the known issues list from Insider Hub:

    • The Music app will disappear if minimized within 16 seconds of launch. Just leave it in the foreground for 20 seconds or so and it should work just fine. 

    • The Music app will stop if you open it and then minimize it within a very short time. We're aware of this issue, and are working to fix it. In the meantime, you can work around this by waiting 20-30 seconds to minimize the app after you launch it. 

    Love how in the first bullet point they're so precise in the first sentence with "16 seconds", yet they say "wait 20 seconds or so..."  I've actually had this issue on my Windows Phone forever. 

    One thing I don't like is having an arbitrarily set limit on the number of background modern apps I can have on my Core i7 with 12GB of RAM because someone, somewhere, who is not me, and is not using my computer, might have a tablet.

     

  • Windows 10 - The next chapter

    Yeah I really like this build for the most part. I'm glad they didn't totally ruin the "tablet" mode. I do think "tablet mode" should have the charms and dispense with the window title bars, though. I really didn't have a problem with UI of Windows 8/8.1, I just thought it was only appropriate for a touch device. I like the desktop stuff in 10, but I think there's a way to keep a good balance when I'm switching between tablet/desktop context.

    I'm still running Windows 7 because I don't have anything touchscreen and I've been previewing 10 in a virtual machine (though I wish work would get me a Surface 3), but I'll probably be upgrading to Windows 10 day of release, despite my feelings on the amount of wasted space in the UI. 

    --

    As far as the free upgrade during the first year is concerned, I suspect, as far as spurring business adoption of Windows 10, that it will likely affect the SMB space more than anything else business-wise, as those are the companies that would definitely benefit from something like this and have more of an incentive to upgrade than staying where they are. Big enterprises that have just completed their testing, QA, and deployment of Windows 7 (yeah it took this long) will likely be less affected by the free upgrade as their maintenance agreements likely already entitle them to the next release as long as they're current, which they'd be fools not to be. 

    Though, being in IT, I'm allowed to QA the next releases, so I'll probably be upgrading to 10 at work even though everyone else is on 7. 

    Really like how Microsoft seems to be listening to feedback too. 

  • Windows 10 - The next chapter

    Addendum: Ok, this is apparently because modern apps have a minimum height and my 19 inch widescreen with a resolution of 1440x900 means my monitor is pretty much the same height as the minimum height of modern apps.

    Geez, how big of a monitor do I need so that these "windowed" modern applications aren't, essentially, full screen? Why the hell is everything so damn big?

     edit: cleaned up profanity.

  • Windows 10 - The next chapter

    I've installed 9926 and I have two questions:

    When running a "modern" app in a window on the desktop, am I not supposed to be able to resize these windows vertically -- i.e. make them SHORTER? On both this build and the previous build (both fresh installations) I have not been able to. They simply take up the entire height of my display with no ability to make them shorter. I can resize them horizontally (make them WIDER and THINNER), but not vertically.

    My second question is -- why is it that when I ask other people if they have this issue, they lie to me and say they can resize these apps just fine in every direction? I have a Dell XPS 8700, pretty fracking standard.

    Or does everyone I ask just not know what the frack "vertical" means?

  • Windows 10 - The next chapter

    , felix9 wrote

    *snip*

    while I'm still not exactly sure what will happen if you wiped the harddrive and reinstalled Windows, but Terry Myerson said clearly its free-for-life license if you upgrade in a year, not a yearly subscription or like, no need to pay anything after a year, so, not a trial.

    Why would having to wipe and reinstall an OS that you got for free be any different than a wipe and reinstall of an OS you paid for? You reinstall, type your key, and activate.

     

  • Windows 10 - The next chapter

    , DeathBy​VisualStudio wrote

    Love the Surface Hub too. The Office 2019 vision is finally taking shape. Well done Microsoft!

     

    Hopefully the Outlook guys have read up on how to close files. Office 2013 and I'm still having to close Outlook if I want to delete a folder that I saved an attachment to sometime in the last day and that hasn't changed since Office XP.

    Yeah yeah, I know, "works fine here."

     

  • A decent, incremental online backup system

    Crashplan has a few destination options too. $6.00/mo lets you backup to their cloud, but you can also backup to another Crashplan user's computer (it's all encrypted), or another computer of your own that has CrashPlan installed, even one off site with just the free client. You could pretty much roll your own cloud solution and just use the CrashPlan client if you were inclined to do so. (I'm pretty sure the connections are still brokered through their servers though).

    One thing to keep in mind is that the CrashPlan service runs as LocalSystem and doesn't support UNC paths, so if you want it to backup remote shares, you'll have to follow this unsupported procedure here: Backing up a Windows Network Drive. This would include NAS devices connected via SMB/CIFS, unless you can get the Mac, Windows, or Linux clients to install to the NAS itself. 

    All my stuff is on a Windows server, so I just install the client there and forget about it.

    One of my clients has about a TB with FiOS 50/50. We limited the bandwidth and backup hours and it took about two weeks for the seed backup, but after that, all incremental.

     

     

  • A decent, incremental online backup system

    I use Crashplan, $6/mo unlimited one computer. Has configurable history/retention.

  • Windows-free for a week now, and surviving

    , Bass wrote

    *snip*

    Even if Microsoft tech is dying, and I'm still not 100% sure on this one, there is still tons and tons organizations with SharePoint installations (for whatever reason require teams of people to manage?) .. :snip:

    As with most things like this, it depends on the scale. If you're running an intranet page with a couple document libraries for a 200 man firm, one or two people can run the entire network, with SharePoint pretty much running itself as a "set it and forget it" Intranet.

    If, however, you're using SharePoint to standardize on templates, implement automated workflows, centralize project management, implement private cloud (e.g. OneDrive for business), or use it as a platform for business applications, and you have to manage it across a large organization with hundreds of divisions, departments, and thousands of people --- you need a staff.

     

  • Windows-free for a week now, and surviving

    Who writes applications to the POSIX specification?