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GoddersUK GoddersUK A is A.
  • Nexus 9 tablet released

    , cbae wrote

    The device got a pretty poor review from the Verge. Notably, the performance score was quite low,

    But it's 64 bitz!!11!!one!

     Google engineers have skillz that kill compared to the engineers at Samsung, LG, and Sony.

    Or just Google don't install hideous bloatware while the OEMs do?

  • Nexus 9 tablet released

    , spivonious wrote

    On a sidenote, does anyone else hate this new trend of webpages that have things move around as you scroll?

    Also does anyone else hate meaningless tech speak?

    Google wrote:

    Yes, that has everything to do with the processor being 64 bit. I mean, sure, you can probably do that and the processor may well be 64 bit, it's not exactly a causative relationship though.

  • 10. BINDING ARBITRATION AND CLASS ACTION WAIVER IF YOU LIVE IN THE UNITED STATES

    @ScanIAm: Ah... when I realised what Tylenol I was astounded that people would pay $25 for it... that situation explains it. That's exploitation through and through. The Hippocratic oath clearly doesn't apply to financial health...

  • 10. BINDING ARBITRATION AND CLASS ACTION WAIVER IF YOU LIVE IN THE UNITED STATES

    , ScanIAm wrote

    *snip*

    You had me until this part.  The cost of malpractice insurance for doctors has an effect on the cost, but it certainly doesn't make a Tylenol cost $25 per pill.  Medicine costs what it costs because it's a seller's market.

    EDIT: OK, Tylenol doesn't cost $25 per pill... assuming OP wasn't a joke please substitute some other drug in when reading the post :)

    Tylenol costs $25 per pill to pay for all the brains that went into making it, to pay for the risk the company undertook in paying all those brains and for their equipment and for costly trials which had no guarantee of success (and for the many potential drugs that receive all this investment and never make it to market). Tylenol that costs $25/pill is better than no Tylenon at all. And 20 or so years after the patent you can get generic Tylenol for which you'll only have to pay manufacture and distribution costs.

    If Tylenol didn't cost $25 per pill and you still wanted new drugs you'd just have to pay for it in your taxes instead. [EDIT to add: There is no magic route to free, novel, drugs. I won't tell you how you should pay for them, but if you want them someone has to pay for them.]

    No, the pharmaceutical industry isn't filled with paragons of virtue, but to quote Dr. Ben Goldacre (immediately after a strong attack on current medical research in general):

    ...there is no medicine without medicines. Drug companies around the world have produced some of the most amazing innovations of the past fifty years, saving lives on an epic scale.

    This is a point I am afraid is lost on many of the less nuanced and less insightful individuals that take part in this discussion.

    (I'd highly recommend both of Ben Goldacre's books (Bad Science and Bad Pharma) which not only provide insight into some of the problems in medical research but concrete suggestions of how they can be fixed.

    I'd also recommend Mark Henderson's The Geek Manifesto for his excellent chapter on how common approaches to science policy do more harm than good, using the green movement (and global warming) in particular as an example (tl;dr: green groups: engage in big government or you deny gobal warming; conservatives: well then we'll deny global warming; cycle repeats, nobody benefits) and the dangers of failing to separate scientific statements (global warming is real) from policy statements (therefore we have the right to tell people what kind of lightbulbs to use [science can not evaluate whether or not this policy is right, at best it can hypothesise what impact it might have on global warming]).)

    EDIT: Turns out Tylenol is just paracetamol. If you're knowingly paying $25 per pill for something you can pick up own-brand at the local supermarket for 25c per pack then I have little sympathy for you.

  • Microsoft Watch

    I think Microsoft missed a lot of potential here, I'm sure this would have been a bigger hit:

    :P

  • Ebola spreads to USA

    @blowdart:

    On Monday's NBC Nightly News, Brian Williams read a brief statement from Snyderman, in which the good doctor allowed that "members of our group violated those [quarantine] guidelines and understand that our quarantine is now mandatory."

    That made me smile, if breaching a "voluntary" quarantine makes it mandatory then surely it was mandatory all along?

  • Ebola spreads to USA

    @Proton2: I must admit some responses/suggested responses to ebola are evocative of response to the "St. Mary's Virus"...

  • SpamSpamSpam

    http://channel9.msdn.com/Niners/canhovietnam

  • Ebola spreads to USA

    , JohnAskew wrote

    This is not comforting: the U.S. government patented Ebola in 2010 and now claims intellectual property ownership over all Ebola variants. That patent number is CA2741523A1, viewable at this link.

    So far as I can tell from the abstract that's a patent on use of the virus as a potential vaccine component:

    Compositions and methods including and related to the Ebola Bundibugyo virus (EboBun) are provided. Compositions are provided that are operable as immunogens to elicit and immune response or protection from EboBun challenge in a subject such as a primate. Inventive methods are directed to detection and treatment of EboBun infection

    The fact that the patent is owned by the US government is probably a good thing because it stops any single company having a monopoly over use of Ebola in the vaccine - although patents are infamously dense and difficult to read and I'm no specialist in biology there seems to be little novel invention here so, although generally I'm not necessarily anti-patent, in this case I'm glad it's not a private entity that has the patents.

  • now i have 40 GB of free SkyDrive :)

    @Sven Groot: Moved, thanks!