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RichardRudek RichardRudek So what do you expect for nothin'... :P
  • Jon Udell and Mary Czerwinski on interruptions, context reacquisition, and spatial/temporal memory

    An interesting podcast.

    I suspect that what I'm about to say is already understood, but the thing that bugs me about this personalisation stuff is that it does it without my permission, and typically, in a half-arsed (appendaged/simple) fashion.

    I would probably use at least some of it, if it instead collected the appropriate information (tightly integrated), and then only after it has figured out that there would be a significant improvement in my productivity, make an offer to personalise the program. The offer should provide supporting evidence, and appropriately focused solutions, much like you have would to do in the real world. eg:

    "Hey, I noticed that you keep opening and closing the object browser. You don't have any of the accessibility features enabled, and you have enough screen real estate, did you know that you can dock it so it is now accessible via a Tab ?" with options for "Show me" and "Bugger off"

    Or the opposite, "Hey, I noticed that your screen redraws are piling up because your using the Visual Studio IDE via Remote Desktop. If you unpin these panes..."

    Just like in the real world, these offers should only occur at appropriate times (scheduled ?). Naturally, this includes the ability to completely turn this stuff off. Logging and all... Wink

  • Steve Teixeira and Bill Dunlap: Visual C++ Today and Tomorrow

    staceyw wrote:
    
    RichardRudek wrote:Unless your unfortunate enough to do some sub-contracting work for a large Corporation or Government who are just now deploying Windows XP to Desktops with IE6 and Office 2003...


    In that case, why not just deploy .Net 2.0 with the image?


    What image ?  You mean the new desktop deployments ?

    Note that as a sub-contractor, I have very little say about how the client runs their IT departments or infrastructure.

    To that end, these types of clients are so anal about what is supplied to them, that even when you follow everything to the letter, it takes a year to deploy really simple stuff.

    I can understand their motivations, ALL of the stuff which becomes part of their SOE (Standard Operating Environment) needs to be regression tested, which includes security audits.

    So the reality of the situation is that deploying something like the .NET framework to desktops or servers will fail the security audits, because they are basically overworked (perhaps lazy) and/or incompetent - the better safe than sorry principle ; when in doubt, leave it out... To achieve "breakthrough", there has to be a significant amount of back-pressure from many vendors. Usually yielding without having actually performed any competent form of security audit...

    Hell, just trying to have them setup Integrated Security between their Servers is a non-starter. So you have this insane situation where as a developer, you have to involve myself in their security administrivia - violating the "need to know" security principles. Stupid stuff, really.

    But then again, these IT departments are just appendages - their core business/purpose is not IT.

  • Steve Teixeira and Bill Dunlap: Visual C++ Today and Tomorrow

    ScaleOvenStove wrote:
    They finally got it right with Vista, but now it will be 3-5 years before saturation.

    Unless your unfortunate enough to do some sub-contracting work for a large Corporation or Government who are just now deploying Windows XP to Desktops with IE6 and Office 2003...
  • Sampy Gets Shot in the Face - A Channel 9 Exclusive

    Big Smile

    But you fell for the old HR trick, where they make you think you can only attack your own instead of them...[6]



  • Anders Hejlsberg, Herb Sutter, Erik Meijer, Brian Beckman: Software Composability and the Future of

    I think the reason why you had compiler developers saying that "F# was their favourite dynamic language" is more due to an issue of your refined (limited) definition of "dynamic", in this context. ie A question that (mischievously ?) sets up the answerer to fail your implicit, scope-limited defintion... [A]

    This kinda reminds me of some experients that were done on children of varying ages when asked "which of these two straws is taller". The children were individually sat down at a table with two identical straws (length, colour, etc). However, one of the straws was moved further away. The three year olds (I'm not actually sure of this age, but it'll do) always selected the straw furthest away. In other words, the problem was actually a mismatch between the experience of the questioner and answerer. The questioner's definition of "taller" was more refined than the child's. However, once those children had been shown what was actually meant by the question, they moved the straws next to each other, and (effectively) answered "they are both the same".


    PS: Hey, I couldn't resist given Anders' little dig about Academics and functional programming... Smiley

    REALLY good interview !
  • Mike Flasko and Anthony Jones: Winsock and .NET Protocol Agnostic Development

    Charles wrote:
    
    [snip]

    At any rate, I am more interested in what the postscript contained from a developer feedback point of view, assuming you were venting about networking or C or something that the interviewees (most important, always) could engage....
    C


    Ah, that's why said it was detracting.

    I bitched about about the use of the word "pound" for the "#" symbol (hash or hatch). Then went on to question why it was cool to say "whack" instead of slash... grumpy old man stuff... there, I said it... Smiley
  • Mike Flasko and Anthony Jones: Winsock and .NET Protocol Agnostic Development

    Charles wrote:
    
    What was the postscript?
    C


    It wasn't about you, Charles.

    Good Interview, BTW.

  • Mike Flasko and Anthony Jones: Winsock and .NET Protocol Agnostic Development

    Hmm.

    In the agnostic C code example, where the Winsock "service" is IPV4 only, but the PC on which it is running has IPv6 as well, surely there is going to be a performance/user experience issue related to timeouts, unless I'm misinterpreting what was said. eg If getaddrinfo() returns multiple IP Addresses, IPv6 and v4, the IPv6 ones are listed first, right ?


    EDIT: Removed detracting (grumpy old man) postscript.
  • Celso Gomes : Designing in "WPF/E"

    I guess I wasn't interested enough, because I could not concentrate on anything else but the focus. Stopped it after just a few minutes - driving me absolutely crazy !

    I even looked up how auto-focus works to see wether there was any validity to your claims about the images fooling the camera.

    There's basically two types, and when the target is a Flat-panel LCD... the camera needs servicing and/or you need to learn how to use the manual focus.

    Sorry.
  • Scott Field: How secure is Vista, really? - Part I

    Charles wrote:
    
    It was a long interview. Hard to find the perfect spot to create a part 1 from. We found it, but the window was real small..... We talked about so much and it is all related, technically.
    C


    D'oh (magoo), I've done it again.

    I didn't realise it was a two-parter... [A]