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SecretSoftware Secret​Software Code to live, but Live to code.
  • The Advancement of Windows: Ales Holecek - Windows Shell (Windows Explorer, Desktop Search, UAC, Aer

    Charles wrote:
    
    Massif wrote: 
    Charles wrote: 
    However, your conclusion, which appears to miss an understandably implicit point: data created as a direct result of your interactions with the system, how you use it and how it is capable of making your intentions achievable in a predictable and reliable way, makes proving or disproving the hypothesis empirically impossible(we think we may be on to something theoretically, but theory is purely abstract).


    hate to be pedantic here Charles (what am I talking about, I'm a geek - I live for pedantry!) but it's impossible to prove anything empirically.

    You can verify your hypothesis, but you cannot prove it, as in order to prove a hypothesis empirically you'd have to observe all possible permutations and outcomes, (and as you're being empirical you wouldn't be allowed to inform your observations from your theory, as you haven't proved your theory yet! So you'd have to literally observe all possible permutations ever ever ever.)


    In science, a Theory (with a capital T) is another way of expressing an Hypothesis that has been "proven" due to direct observations, or measurements, that show the conjecture to be factual.


    Well Then what are Laws? I learned that Hypothesis is a postulated explanation of natural phenomena. If the hypothesis explains the phenomenon under varying conditions, it becomes a working theory. If this theory is yet demonstrated to , over time, explain the fundamentals of the phenomenon, and all outcomes are accounted for, then it becomes a Law of nature. Like the Gravetational laws, laws of motion, Newtons laws etc..

    So , generally, in science, we never use the  word "Proven", we say the hypothesis was not demonstrated to fail, yet or something along those words.
  • The Advancement of Windows: Ales Holecek - Windows Shell (Windows Explorer, Desktop Search, UAC, Aer

    Charles wrote:
    
    SecretSoftware wrote: 

    I gather from this video, that MS went to the direction of writing new OS (VISTA), because the current model in XP and 2003, is unupdatable, because the code base is old and is not organized in a way to allow for future improvements. SO when he said that Vista is "a mile stone for us", he meant that Vista will be a new platform OS that will enable them to move to the future without the strings that were in the previous implementations of things in XP and 2003.

    So when Windows Vienna comes, its going to be breath-taking. That is why I am not so much excited about vista, but about what is going to come after vista as a progress ontop of the new foundations that were implemented into Vista. That is why I compare this stage as going from DOS to Win95.



    Intersting analysis. The hypothesis(first paragraph) is a compelling one. However, your conclusion, which appears to miss an understandably implicit point: data created as a direct result of your interactions with the system, how you use it and how it is capable of making your intentions achievable in a predictable and reliable way, makes proving or disproving the hypothesis empirically impossible(we think we may be on to something theoretically, but theory is purely abstract).

    It's nice to see that people are beginning to realize that Vista is a new OS, one that is also intelligent: composed of subsystems that are capable of not only learning, but also prone to interacting with newly gained knowledge in a cybernetic way.

    Vista sows the seeds for a future Windows that becomes not only intelligent, reliable, safe, performant, usable, but also predictable, composable, homeostatic. Evolutionary acceleration of Windows will remain static without high use of the system by real people.

    C


    I postulated that above, because in my experiance, back in 95 and 98 and then in XP, I found it hard to really have freedom in programming new implementations of things. You feel as if you are trying to write a page with 4 people holding your hand or so. Its kind of hard to think clearly, and hard to implement your ideas. Now once .NET came, some of these hands were lifted and you can move freely, so to speak, and have your own implementation under the new standard. The obvious next step was to get rid of the old OS, and re-write the Windows OS in a new and more innovative way, where I dont have so much hands tying me down (All the useless APIs in the old OS). It brought a new way to think clearly, and to implement cleanly any idea you might have. In that sense computer programming becomes as powerfull as magic, and the sky is the limit as they say.

    I only wished that MS made this move back in the 90s , instead of making XP, we could have had Vista, and now Vienna. Having said that, maybe things were not as ready as one would like, but its all for the best I suppose.

  • The Advancement of Windows: Ales Holecek - Windows Shell (Windows Explorer, Desktop Search, UAC, Aer

    I gather from this video, that MS went to the direction of writing new OS (VISTA), because the current model in XP and 2003, is unupdatable, because the code base is old and is not organized in a way to allow for future improvements. SO when he said that Vista is "a mile stone for us", he meant that Vista will be a new platform OS that will enable them to move to the future without the strings that were in the previous implementations of things in XP and 2003.

    So when Windows Vienna comes, its going to be breath-taking. That is why I am not so much excited about vista, but about what is going to come after vista as a progress ontop of the new foundations that were implemented into Vista. That is why I compare this stage as going from DOS to Win95.

  • A Closer Look at the Team Foundation Server Power Toys

    And I was woundering why  C9 home page looks beautiful today.
    Nice video.

  • Windows Vista: Ready for ReadyDrive

     

    this is cool. But I think the real solution to the Hard-drive performance problem is to have hard drives with multi-reader heads, that will enable multiple queries or read/write operations happening simultanously. So, one can have a drive with a circular readors mounted on top of the hard drive surface, and these multiple heads will do the read write as the surface is spinning. So like a circle (heads circle ) on top of the actual surface (on top could be ont he top surface or bottom surface or both). So you have these heads organized in a circle on top or on the bottom surfaces of the actual drive surface doing Read/Write operations concurrently. This in addition to the hybrid idea can improve the performance significantly. Would not that be the case?

     

    But cool Video. And the sound quality of this video is super.

  • Anders Hejlsberg - Lang.Net 2006 Compiler Symposium

    works good. Nice video. It will take some time to load. But works great. Great Presentation.
  • Arun Kishan - Process Management in Windows Vista

    arunki wrote:
    1) Code injection is only limited for the protected processes, which are not meant to provide arbitrary extensibility by design. These processes can only load specially digitally signed code. The goal is to limit what can run inside them.

    2) There is no one-one mapping between work items and threads. Work queues and the threadpool try to manage the number of threads based on the workload / CPU availability. For example, the Vista threadpool tries to keep # CPU threads running, but will throttle threads back when it detects this number has been exceeded. Additional threads are created as needed in this range; the excess work items accumulate and are serviced by threads as they become available.

    3) It depends on your application. If it is a piece of code you just want to execute asynchronously, threadpool provides an efficient and simple means of accomplishing this. It does, however, introduce additional overhead. In other cases, you may need a dedicated thread for a task whose operation / life cycle you may need finer grained control over.




    Thanks for the reply. I like the new protected process with in vista. But I wish if we can have examples as to how to create a protected process using Visual Studio 2005 in C#. Like an introduction as to how to create a protected application.

    Also, in the video , it was mentioned that the END PROCESS api will just kill of the process on the spot and this should be used only as a last measure, and if we know the state the process is in (most of us dont know that because we did not write the application that might go on a loop or hangs). But there are "Service" processes that simply refuse to be killed. You often get "Access denied" or something along those words. Can you explain that?
  • Arun Kishan - Process Management in Windows Vista

    Few questions:

    1)  About code injection: crackers and hackers now , cannot do code injection into running processes? Like dll injection will fail? Will this also affect global system hooks? like mouse hook and the likes?

    how is that actually good?



    2) What happens when the system is low on threads? when you do something like, QueueWorkItem, and use the system threads to do work in your application, and you "abuse this", in a server application, what would happen to the system at this stage when its under stress? Does it shutdown? or just queues the new work items until an existing system thread is free to process it? Can a new thread be created and added to the system thread pool/ Is this actually a good thing or a bad thing for a uniprocessor system?

    3) Is it actually good to use the system thread pool or to create a new unique thread for your specific application? 
  • Arun Kishan - Process Management in Windows Vista

    Thanks for this video. It helped me understand how windows manages threads that I program in my apps. Great video. Keep it up.