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Discussions

Shining Arcanine Shining Arcanine
  • Microsoft claims that it loves open source

    blowdart said:
    Shining Arcanine said:
    *snip*

    Ah yes, the if you don't like it rewrite it argument of open source. What a crock, I mean really. How many companies have developers skilled enough to redevelop a language, or something like Apache?

    I am not a user of Ruby on Rails, so I do not understand what you find to be wrong with it under Windows, but I think just about every possible option that could be made available to rectify your complaints is available.

     

    If you are such a fan of how it operates on Linux and you do not want to touch source code, you can run it under cygwin on Windows. It should work just as well.

  • Microsoft claims that it loves open source

    Bass said:

    Wait what? Microsoft is trying to selfishly gain profit at the expense of the rest of the industry? They have a word for that I think. "Competition" Smiley

     

    Don't try to assign human qualities of purpose to public corporations. They all exist for only one purpose: accumulation of wealth.

    Talking about data portability, standards, etcetera is nice only when it is applied consistently. It is a truly vulgar to expect your competitors to adopt practices that help your business without reciprocation commitments.

     

    If Microsoft is serious about data portability, standards, etcetera, then it can start by modifying Microsoft Office to depreciate the current .docx format in favor of a standard implementation of OOXML. Microsoft can continue by making the DRM components of .NET available to the Mono project. Then Microsoft could depreciate Direct3D, DirectAudio, etcetera for their OpenGL, OpenAL, etcetera counterparts. Next Microsoft could modify the software for which it charges a fee that is separate from the cost of Windows to be available for the major UNIX-like operating systems and not dependent on any version of Windows. Such software would include things like Microsoft Office, Visual Studio, the games it publishes, etcetera and they would need to run under major Linux distributions, FreeBSD and Mac OS X. Finally, Microsoft could produce versions of Windows for ARM processors.

  • Microsoft claims that it loves open source

    blowdart said:
    Shining Arcanine said:
    *snip*

    Well it depends. Data storage is pretty portable. However once you start coding for the cloud, well, as ever, if you're writing ASP.NET (Mono aside) then you're going to have to use IIS. PHP gives you options of linux/bsd/windows. Rails, well, rails doesn't work that well on Microsoft, so now you're locked into Linux, and that's only a little better because you might have more linux cloud suppliers.

    Ruby on Rails is available for Windows, it is MIT licensed, and there is nothing stopping people from running it on Windows under cygwin if they do not like the Windows version. If people do not like the Windows version, there is nothing stopping them from modifying the source code to produce something that they do like.

  • Microsoft claims that it loves open source

    JoshRoss said:
    PaoloM said:
    *snip*

    Paolo, you're into D&D, right? You need to find a nice profile picture for Shining Arcanine.  Is there such a thing as a level 20 troll?

     

    Just another Troll

     

    -Josh

    I think I have a valid complaint. At the same time, your ad hominem attack is invalid.

  • Microsoft claims that it loves open source

    PaoloM said:

    Sure, but you certainly didn't mean "migrate people to some version of Windows", because that has nothing to do with data portability; standard based technologies; ease of migration and deployment across cloud networks; and developer choice, right?

    Actually, it does. Cloud computing is a market dominated by Linux and Microsoft wants it get into it, so Microsoft promoting things that make it easier for them to get people to migrate away from Linux, which benefits Windows. If this convinces people to migrate, Microsoft will attempt a vendor lock-in as people switch by introducing them to a ton of Windows-specific things with no intention of providing them to other platforms and every intention of having them use it, making developer choice go only in one direction.

  • Microsoft claims that it loves open source

    http://www.networkworld.com/news/2010/082310-microsoft-open-source.html?hpg1=bn

     

    Paoli's recent work involves a new Microsoft initiative to promote interoperability among the key components of cloud networks. The initiative, described in July at the O'Reilly Open Source Convention, is attempting to promote data portability; use of standards-based technologies; ease of migration and deployment across cloud networks; and developer choice.

     

    Am I the only one who notices that Microsoft is enthusiastic about promoting standardization and data portability on other people's platforms, but when it comes to promoting standardization and data portability on their own platforms, their enthusiasm quickly fades? Is this Microsoft's way of saying "we want you to help us move people to our platform so that we can lock them into it"?

     

    It seems to me that developer choice only goes in one direction with Microsoft. Can anyone demonstrate an instance where Microsoft has not tried to migrate people to some version of Windows?

  • Optional parameters are evil

    exoteric said:
    Shining Arcanine said:
    *snip*

    Aside from the fact that the code does not fix it (not valid C#), I'm pretty sure Sven is aware of the solution to this problem. Wink

    I have been around so much Java that I am beginning to mix and match Java and C++. In my mind, that was valid C++ code. Sad

  • Microsoft's XP RAM Disk Driver

    AndyC said:
    The RAM disk is intended for special case scenarios (embedded devices, WinPE) when writeable disk is needed but difficult / expensive to provide.

    It's not going to improve your system performance. If anything it will degrade it as it is nowhere near as efficient as the Windows cache manager.

    It depends on how much RAM you have. If you have say 2TB of RAM, it should make things faster, although copying the file system to it and then doing redirection might be an issue.

     

    Could antivirus APIs be used in a program to detect changes to the disk while it copies things to the RAM drive? Could a junction point be used afterward to do redirection? When you want to shut down the system, could the changes be merged back into the filesystem without causing problems as it is done? These questions probably need to be answered before doing this kind of thing.

  • Optional parameters are evil

    Sven Groot said:

    Why is this symptomatic of optional parameters? I can run into exactly the same problem without them:

     

    enum SomeEnum{One, Two};
    class SomeClass
    {
      private SomeEnum someEnum;
    
      private DoWork(SomeEnum someEnum)
      {
        someEnum = someEnum;
      }
    }

     

    No optional parameters, same problem.

    enum SomeEnum{One, Two}; class SomeClass { private SomeEnum someEnum; private DoWork(SomeEnum someEnum) { this->someEnum = someEnum; } }

     

    That should fix it. Although I have never tried it, ::someEnum or SomeClass::someEnum might also work.

  • Why did Microsoft kill its project to allow PC gamers and XBox 360 gamers to play on the same server?

    rhm said:

    Jesus, how many more threads for this exact story do we need?

    I did not realize that the other thread was on this topic. I thought it was of a philosophical thread on the merits of game consoles.