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Discussions

buggy123 buggy123
  • What if Microsoft designed the iPod box?

    Word is that this was made by somebody inside Microsoft, and that they're in hot water now that this has come out.

    If true, that's foolish. Denying the reality is a move from weakness. As is using power to suppress the discussion. Seems like a poor idea to punish people for being talented and expressing dissenting opinions; the obvious lesson for employees and prospects to draw is that Microsoft would rather have a mediocre monoculture.

    Of course, if that's what the execs want, it's easy enough to get.
     

  • no topic

    nothing

  • Can't use Visual Studio Anayzer

    Maybe you can HELP! me...

    I want to you VSA to analyze a distributed system.
    If I try to create a new projekt, I can't select a VSA projekt anywhere.
    I found a lot of pages in the VS documentation like "What is Visual Studio Analyzer" but I still can't create a VSA projekt!

    How can I install VSA?
    Do I have to purchase VSA by its own or comes it with Visual Studio??

    I am using VS 2003 but also using the complete VS 2005 Pro installation, I can't use VSA.

    Am I to stupid??

    Thanks for any answer!

  • Windows Media Center 2005 Review

    rjdohnert wrote:
    DoomBringer wrote:This review is crap.


    It was not crap, it was worse than crap.  It was dog ate then thrown up crap, it was pea soup crap with chunks of peanuts and crackers.    It was not a good review.  First, he used a cheap board and cheap boards dont work, especially those with integrated devices even if you replace said devices you are guaranteed problems.  Who in their right mind would use ATI crap except for Linux guys because "ATI is a true believer"  ATI ,in one word, blows.  NVidia only for real graphics power.  I havent messed with an Audigy card before so I wont comment on that but so far the only thing I can tell is poor manufactureing and a poor choice in hardware.


    The review isn't crap... because it is NOT a review.  It's a humorus look at one guys trials and tribulations installing/using MCE 2005 and being underwhelmed by the whole experience.  

    Of course the install could have went better (the author did make mistake/imperfect choices), but then again that wouldn't make much of an article would it have?  You don't read many "Man succesfully installs Microsoft Office 2003" articles. 

    It's bad enough that the web is full of faux-glossover-reviews... but again this isn't a review, it's a journal/experience piece.

    I frequently see the trouble people have with MCE 2005 installs, and although the article was kinda extreme in it's characterization of the pratfalls of MCE 2005, it's not THAT far off the mark.

    And just because they chose ATI over Nvidia (although i'm preferential to nvidia for HTPC stuff) doesn't make the author an idiot or mean MCE 2005 should run like crap -- plus there was a time when the ATI HDTV wonder cards woudl ONLY work with ATI cards (which was a dumb bug on ATI's part, but i digress)

    *shrug*  YMMV, 

    but don't crap on the article because it was a crappy review... because it wasn't a review at all!  Consider it infotainment Wink

    rampy via bugmenot

  • 3D Channel 9 Dude (video) in XAML - Made in ZAM 3D

    wow? this is the lamest thing I've ever seen.

  • Jumping out of a ​heavily-​nested loop not by using goto statement?

    bitzero wrote:

    DON'T NEST LOOPS.   IT'S WRONG.


    Sorry to dredge up such an old thread, but I'd just thought I ought to comment on your hatred towards the use of nested loops. I understand that in some sections of the industry there is no real need to have nested loops in any program. However, in the embedded world it is quite useful and necessary.

    For example, I'm creating a flash driver for a chip that has the following conditions to write a large chunk of data to flash:
    1) After writing a word to flash, you have to wait for flash to be ready before you write the next word. Since this is only a few dozen clock cycles, waiting in a loop is proper procedure. If you wait for longer than expected, then something is wrong and you need to report an error.
    2) After writing to a 64 byte block, you have to exit write mode for a short period of time.

    In a PC environment, the pseudo-code to accomplish this may look like this:

    bool WriteFlash()
    {
       bool returnVal;
       while(still have data to write)
       {
          returnVal = WriteBlock();
          if(returnVal == FALSE)
          {
             break;
          }
       }
    }

    bool WriteBlock()
    {
       bool returnVal;
       SetupWriteMode();
       while(still have data in block to write)
       {
          WriteWord();
          returnVal = IsFlashReady();
          if(returnVal == FALSE)
          {
             break;
          }
       }
       ExitWriteMode();
       return returnVal;
    }

    bool IsFlashReady()
    {
       int i = 0;
       bool returnVal;
       while(flash is not ready && i < EXPECTED_WAIT)
       {
          i++;
       }
       if(i >= EXPECTED_WAIT)
       {
          returnVal = FALSE;
       }
       else
       {
          returnVal = TRUE;
       }
       return returnVal;
    }

    As you can see each function is rather simple and there are no nested loops. However, I'm using a 1 MHz microcontroller with 2KB of RAM (yes, chips like this are still used today), of which I only have about 400 bytes for stack space. In this envrionment, nesting functions that do next to nothing is a bad thing because of the added stack space and processing time for entering and exiting a function. For my application, this is actually a better way to write the function:

    bool WriteFlash()
    {
       int i=0;
       while(still have data to write)
       {
          Setup write mode // no function call
          while(still have data in block to write)
          {
             Write word // no function call
             while(flash is not ready && i < EXPECTED_WAIT)
             {
                i++;
             }
             if(i >= EXPECTED_WAIT)
             {
                return FALSE;
             }
          }
          Exit write mode // no function call
       }
       return TRUE;
    }

    You're probably cringing because you see I'm returning from a loop that is nested three levels deep. However, I saved about 5% of my precious stack space by using nested loops instead of nested functions.  A few instances like this makes the difference between an embedded project working or not.  In my opinion, to say something as broad as "nesting loops is wrong" is a little too definitive.

  • Jumping out of a ​heavily-​nested loop not by using goto statement?

    Red5 wrote:
    When using VB.NET, there is always the handy Exit For or Exit Do


    I guess it's worth noting that the example I mentioned was assuming C was used for the programming language.  For most of the microcontrollers and microprocessors that I've used, C or assembly are the only options out there.

  • Steve jobs...among us?

    Wow, so I must be the 9 guy!!! NO SERIOUSLY He steve jobs!

  • Steve jobs...among us?

    Stevie, why did you block me anyways, I didn't want to expose you, I am sorry Sad

  • Steve jobs...among us?

    All I wanted was a t shirt, and he had to make up a stupid story. Steve jobs, you are not cool. Steve ballmer of Microsoft might be though. He steve jobs!