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cbenard

cbenard cbenard

Niner since 2006

  • Introducing the SQL Server 2005 Service Broker

    We tried to watch this in a certification training course for Microsoft 70-431 SQL Server test, but we had to stop.  Was this recorded on your motorcycle on your way to work?  The audio quality was horrible and the video was sub-par.
  • Polita Paulus - BLINQ

    Polita,

    Thanks for the answer about using SPs with LINQ and Blinq.  For clarification though, am I to understand that if you do standard LINQ queries like "from c in .... where .... select...." that it will not be optimized in SQL sql server?  If I'm understanding that correctly, it is simply passing "select ... from ... where..." to SQL server as an ad hoc query if you're not calling SPs.

    Thanks again.
  • Polita Paulus - BLINQ

    I watched this short one and the longer one by Anders on LINQ, and it seems neat to be able to program against objects instead of "select column, column from table where criteria".  It seems really nice to get intellisense for what you're doing.

    However, one problem I can see remains: nobody who is serious about what they're doing is going to be writing ad hoc queries inside their general purpose programming language.  They're going to be calling stored procedures that are already precompiled.  When I watched Anders, while he had his log enabled, I could see the raw SQL that the LINQ object was sending to the SQL server.

    So, my question is this: Are LINQ and BLINQ sending actual SQL queries to the SQL server that cannot be optimized unless they're the exact same query and have already been precompiled?  If so, it seems like there's no way for SQL to have an execution plan ready ahead of time.  How do LINQ and BLINQ address this?