Entries:
Comments:
Posts:

Loading User Information from Channel 9

Something went wrong getting user information from Channel 9

Latest Achievement:

Loading User Information from MSDN

Something went wrong getting user information from MSDN

Visual Studio Achievements

Latest Achievement:

Loading Visual Studio Achievements

Something went wrong getting the Visual Studio Achievements

Discussions

contextfree` contextfree`
  • My prediction for the .NET Windows 8 dev story, based on leaks

    My take based on the leaks + general knowledge:

    Windows 8 will have a new version of the CLR - the System Language Runtime - which is developed
     under the Windows division, forked from DevDiv's own CLR code. This will be aimed at solving the
     performance problems that WinDiv sees with the mainsteam CLR, as well as solving their other 
    major problem with the CLR which is of course that they didn't write it.  :P 
    Together with this it will have a new UI framework, DirectUI (no relation to the previous internal-only
     DirectUI), which is loosely based on Silverlight and XAML, but will have a native API together with a 
    managed (SLR) API. Basically, this will be their third try at the Avalon concept after WPF or Silverlight.
     Or:

    Take 1: CLR + WPF

    Take 2: CoreCLR + Silverlight

    Take 3: SLR + DirectUI

    This will be the supported way to write "immersive" Win8 apps in managed code

    This will be good for .NET developers because:

    • They'll get to write immersive apps after all
    • They'll have a version of .NET with much-improved performance (esp. startup time), and a UI framework with better hardware accelerated graphics
    • They'll finally be able to write Explorer and IE extensions in managed code
    This will be bad for .NET developers because:
    • It will be yet another not-quite compatible framework, after WPF and Silverlight
    • Because they are starting over again, and with more stringent performance standards, it will probably be less capable/full-featured than current Silverlight/.NET, like going back to Silverlight 3
    • Since it's being developed by the Windows team as part of Windows, they'll probably apply the more stringent "run the memory allocator in a different mode so SimCity will work" Windows approach to maintaining backwards compatibility as well, which means even in the future it will probably evolve more slowly than mainline CLR (plus, of course, Windows is on a slower release cadence).
    You could probably develop immersive apps in Silverlight or WPF if you really wanted, but the
     Windows team wouldn't recommend it as performance wouldn't be to their standards and you'd
     probably have to go through a bunch of interop hoops to use the DirectUI widgets etc. 
    Anyway, this would explain why they vaguely hint at there being some kind of .NET story, 
    but refuse to say anything - if the answer was a straight yes or no, it'd be easy enough, 
    but the answer is "it's complicated", so before saying anything they have to figure out how to spin it 
    properly.  :P

  • Windows 8 - is the broken UAC still doing its dirty deed?

    Leaks, and findings in the leaked alpha builds, strongly suggest that together with the new app store Win8 will add a new sandboxing system to isolate apps and control which resources/capabilities they can access, similar to the iOS/WP7 setup. How they will reconcile that with the need to run existing software I have no idea.

  • Ballmer in the News...

    @Ray7: The chain of command goes CEO -> President -> Senior Vice President -> Corporate Vice President. For example when Scott Guthrie (CVP) was in charge of the .net Platform, he reported to S. Somasegar (SVP, Developer Division), who reported to Bob Muglia (President, Server & Tools Division) (later replaced by Satya Nadella) who reported to Ballmer (CEO). So an SVP isn't the same as a President, it's a different (lower) level in the hierarchy.

  • IBM's market ​capitalizat​ion surpasses Microsoft

    Android and Windows Phone emulators are about equally slow for me. I guess it's worse with Android because it's less standardized and you're supposed to test on different resolutions etc.

  • Skype Future Speculation

    Speculation has it this was prompted by the recent Microsoft buyout, others (on Slashdot, of all places) argue that Skype (within Microsoft) operates as a largely independent business unit 

    Skype isn't within Microsoft at all, as the deal hasn't actually gone through yet.

  • IBM's market ​capitalizat​ion surpasses Microsoft

    I've played with Android some and find the dev environment has some interesting ideas but is generally painful to work with, but it could just be because it's not what I'm used to.

  • Anti-​Patterns

    @ScanIAm: I'm not sure if this is bad, but the first time I remove or replace some significant code I usually do just comment it out, because there's a good chance I'll soon want to restore some of it or at least use it as a reference while writing/debugging/modifying the new version, and it's a pain to have to drag it out of source control. After some code has been commented out for a few weeks or so I'll probably delete it as part of a cleanup cycle.

  • Mac malware seems to have taken something of a foothold

    @Ray7: The text on these things is always a dead giveaway though - it never reads as professional (or even grammatical). Their ill-gotten gains still aren't enough to pay for a native English-speaking copywriter, I guess.

  • Mac malware seems to have taken something of a foothold

    @Ray7: Maybe they should look into offering more protection against socially-engineered malware?

  • Finish off the tag line ... "If you havn't got an iPhone ..."

    I have an iPod touch (4), but I have to say I almost never use it.