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dnjake dnjake
  • Seema Ramchandani: From Brain Science to Silverlight

    I don't think Charles got the value proposition quite right.  Presumably, the value proposition to Microsoft is writing Silverlight applications with Visual Studio on Windows.  Presumably nobody is going to offer a development environment on the Mac.  The value to the developer from having Silverlight applications run on IE, FireFox, and Safari on Windows and Mac is getting reach with their applications.  Presumably this feature is essential if you want to attract developers to proprietary frameworks that run over the web.  The situation with Moonlight is more interesting.  Presumably, Mono will have its own development environment and also the potential to run Silverlight applications on the Linux desktop.  It will be interesting to see how that works out and what kind of mixing and matching there is between Microsoft developed tools/appllications and those developed on Linux.
  • endpoint.tv - SOAP and REST a Perspective

    For practial purposes, SOAP is a superset of REST.  The key limitation of REST is the operations which are limited to what HTTP supports.  Like anything else even those limits can be hacked away and actually are by FORM style web processing.  But REST sticks with a small number of basic operations on addressable resources, get, put (insert), post (update), and delete.  These operations are the same ones used to access relational databases.  The alterative that used to be in much more favor is a distributed object model along the lines of DCOM where you have network communication that involves remote references to objects and complicated state models between objects that cooperate across the net.  For all the noise, Microsoft's strategy seems strongly in tune with the REST model.  You see that in the way that LINQ, ADO.Net Data Services, and the Entity Framework operate.  Data is separated from behavior, modeled as sets of entities, and made network addressable.  The operations on data are those used by REST and also by traditional databases.  So the decision between REST and SOAP will mainly revolve around the particular environment that you are working with and the supporting function that is easiest for you to use.
  • Inside Silverlight 2 Beta 2

    It is hard to understand the level of animosity that some Microsoft developers seem to have towads XAML.  At least in WPF, if you want to, you can write out all the object initialization in source code.  But, it is hard to imagine why anyone would think that approach is better than specifying the UI object tree in XAML.  If people have trouble with the XAML, it is probably because they insist on sticking with yesterday's tools.  Conceptually the XAML is fairly trivial.  It is just a compact syntax for specifiying a tree of objects and values for properties and event handlers.  The excellent intellisense support for XAML in Visual Studio makes handling most of the syntax easy to deal with.  Of course there are some issues in understanding binding extentions and how resource references work.  But those issues really have more to do with a funtional understanding the structure of the UI tree than they do with any particular method of specifying it.  I don't doubt that high quality UI design tools are a better user interface than raw XAML.  But functional UI's built around a tree of objects, master detail, or a data grid can easily be designed directly in XAML.

    Of course, many developers have difficulty accepting the increasing emphasis on XML as a replacement for binary formats.  Those deveopers have not caught up with the implications of the success of the internet and the stream of technology that has come from the IETF, the W3C, and companies like Microsoft and IBM.
  • Ian Ellison-Taylor and Kevin Gjerstad on WPF 3.5 SP1

    The 3.5 refers to the .net version.  The problem I saw with the additions of WPF that shipped with .net 3.5 has to do with the documentation.  The documentation of the WPF base release is generally pretty good.  The documentation for the first set of additions is skimpy at best and not integrated with the base documentation.  You need to a better job with the documentation of future additions.
  • Greg Leake: Stocktrader - Overview

    This presentation and some other recent channel nine videos seem to me not to work that well because there is a confusion about whether the video is an interview or a presentation.  Having some videos that are basically presentations of reasonably complex content is certainly useful.  But those kinds of presentations need focus on the presenters words and drawings.  They don't need the camera being waved back and forth between a small part of a chart and the presenter's face.  They also don't need a steady stream of casual comments from Charles disrupting the thread of the presentation.

    I think it would be much better to divide this kind of content into two segments.  One would be a formal presentation.  The silverlight format used for the Mix07 sessions works very well for this kind of content.  The second segment would be an interview by Charles with the presenter that was focused on a discussion of some of the implications of and plans for the project.
  • Sonu Arora and C. Venkatesh: WCF Line of Business Adapter SDK

    The difficulty in consistently providing video that can be streamed over standard DSL connections really sends a bad message about Microsoft's competence. 
  • Conversation with Soma: Orcas Beta 1 and Beyond

    Soma's enthusiasm made the interview quite enjoyable.  It is good to have a separate beta for the express editions.  Although there are some bugs, my experience so far has been pretty good.  It is good to have the WPF visual designer and it looks like WF designer is also included.  However, the situation with the Entity Framework is unclear.  The samples can be compiled with the express edition and they seem to work.  But the documentation and the command line tool needed to generate the framework files (edmGen.exe) are not included.

    Is the plan to restrict the EDM support to the professional versions of Visual Studio?  I can see the argument for doing that and I expect I would be quite satisified playing with SqlMetal.exe and linq to SQL.  On the other hand, I suspect that it is to Microsoft's advantage to try to make the entity framework the standard API for data driven applications as quickly as possible.  In any case, there needs to be clarity about what is in what edition and what is not.