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Discussions

Elmer elmer I'm on my very last life.
  • Windows Vista.... Windows 7 .... Windows 8 .....

    , Proton2 wrote

    I have a laptop that I don;t use very much, but occasionally I use it to watch a video such as on this web site or Windows Weekly. If one day I went to watch a video and couldn't because the subscription lapsed, I would probably throw Chrome on there instead, or something.

    An O/S 'subscription' initial purchase would cover the licence and updates for 12mths. You then just renew the subscription component annually to maintain updates. If your subscription lapses, you no longer get updates, but the license continues to function as the version when it lapsed. If you want to reinstate a lapsed subscription, you pay a pro-rata additional fee.

    I have a number of dev tools that work this way.

  • Windows Vista.... Windows 7 .... Windows 8 .....

    , jamie wrote

    perhaps what im thinking is more the UI runs forever....  like a webpage - but of course works without internet too 

    Windows as a subscription is the logical way forward - essentially like Office365. So long as you subscribe, your copy of Windows will be maintained as the current version (unless you disable updates for whatever reason). The days of needing to buy a packaged product (hence the need for version branding) are pretty much over.

  • Windows Vista.... Windows 7 .... Windows 8 .....

    , Sven Groot wrote

    *snip*

    Yes, but if it can be used while not connected, you can be out of date. And if you can install software on it, such software may require that you are up to date up to a specific version. There needs to be some way to identify that requirement, whether it's a version number of just saying "you need to have the January 2014 release."

    Yes, but that is a technical issue, which software manages, via APIs and utilities.

    You don't need to brand the product with a version, to solve that issue.

  • Windows Vista.... Windows 7 .... Windows 8 .....

    Why identify it with any extra label?

    Windows

    Any version identification is an internal thing that a utility can display, if required.

  • Mads Torgersen @ NDC London : The Future of C#

    , blowdart wrote

    Dictionaries list usage, not formal correctness.

    The actual entry in the OED (which I quoted) acknowledges that the usage is widespread, but ALSO that it "is not acceptable in formal contexts" - i.e. It lists usage AND  formal correctness.

  • Mads Torgersen @ NDC London : The Future of C#

    , blowdart wrote

    *snip*

    The OED did the same Sad

    I think that OED more comments on the common use of literal(ly) in a non-literal context, rather than suggest that it is in any way correct.

    "In recent years an extended use of literally (and also literal) has become very common, where literally (or literal) is used deliberately in non-literal contexts, for added effect, as in they bought the car and literally ran it into the ground. This use can lead to unintentional humorous effects (we were literally killing ourselves laughing) and is not acceptable in formal contexts, though it is widespread."

    I suspect that "used deliberately in non-literal contexts" is a polite way of saying: used erroneously ...LOL.

  • Mads Torgersen @ NDC London : The Future of C#

    You are using an American dictionary to be pedantic about English ?

  • Hardware from years past

    Until quite recently, I had a DEC LA120 still working in our computer room. It didn't do anything of any use, but I just liked to have it sitting there looking all retro and occasionally printing something trivial. Unfortunately, at the last office move, some *%#^ went and sold it for next to nothing - I could have killed them when I found out what they'd done.

  • Hardware from years past

    http://www.ebay.com/bhp/curta-calculator

  • Hardware from years past

    My favourite pieces of hardware were a USB-UltraSCSI adapter made by a company called Ratoc Systems, and a reliable SCA80-LVD/SE UltraSCSI adapter (so I could connect a hot-swap drive to the USB adapter) made by a company called CS Electronics. They allowed me to plug a failed hotswap SCSI drive from the servers into a PC's USB port, and (assuming only a partial failure) recover/repair content using standard PC recovery tools. Both rarely get used these days, but were an absolute life-saver many times in the past.