Entries:
Comments:
Posts:

Loading User Information from Channel 9

Something went wrong getting user information from Channel 9

Latest Achievement:

Loading User Information from MSDN

Something went wrong getting user information from MSDN

Visual Studio Achievements

Latest Achievement:

Loading Visual Studio Achievements

Something went wrong getting the Visual Studio Achievements

Discussions

Gordon Freeman matthews
  • Windows 7 on a Pentium 4, 3.4 ghz with 2GB RAM

    Your PC is a little bit faster than my netbook, so Win7 should run fine on it.

  • Stallman warns against C# and Mono

    LeoDavidson said:
    blowdart said:
    *snip*

    Cannonical's statement seems odd to me on some levels. You could search & replace "C#" and "Mono" with "FAT32" and "LFN" and get a statement which could've been said in the past and we know is wrong now. It's not clear what makes C#/Mono different (though maybe they are different; I don't know).

    On the other hand, perhaps Cannonical don't see it as their job to get in the way of what people use unless someone takes legal action. They can't stop people using Mono; all they can do is choose whether or not to include it in any builds by default (which in turn may encourage/discourage its use by people who hope to get their software included in the same builds, but that's about it). Whether or not important software for the Linux community depends on Mono is up to the community, not Cannonical, so their statement makes sense on that level.

     

    And yet, Ubuntu still has FAT32 drivers included by default; including Mono should seem less risky than that.

  • MS adjusts Win7 European Prices

    blowdart said:
    Bas said:
    *snip*

    And it's reformat and reinstall time.

    And it's a limited time offer. For all of two months from the release date (although to be fair maybe an upgrade version will appear after that)

    Can you not upgrade in the Full versions at all? I know it's possible in the RC, and I'd imagine it ought to be the same as that. Or is it just the E versions that can't upgrade?

  • Revolution 9: Apply for editor upgrade?

    What's to stop a user who's been around for 6 months, even one who's gained credibility, from having malicious intent?

  • What Linux needs to improve for the desktop

    Ubuntu said:
    matthews said:
    *snip*

    Dude, everything you wrote in your post is BS.

    1. Could you be more specific and tell us which are the features that you miss in OpenOffice so much that you think it's 'horrible'?

    2. If nvidia and Ati-AMD open-sourced their drivers there would be no reason to have an open-source 2D driver

    3. If your kernel gets updated you may still choose in your boot menu to boot using the old one - didn't you notice that?

    4. If you update to a newer kernel you should expect for the supported devices coverage to increase rather than decrease (the opposite to Windows)

    I had sh*t to do, and after 3 years on that garbage, I gave up, installed Vista

    You mean that WinXP prior to SP2 (at that point in time) was a better choice? It had poor stability and serious security issues.

    I won't comment on the rest of your post because it's simply ridiculous - you have your agenda you want to put forward and there is no point in arguing.

    1. Could you be more specific and tell us which are the features that you miss in OpenOffice so much that you think it's 'horrible'?

    Ribbon? Lots of built in templates? Not being slow as all hell? Extensibility that doesn't suck? Spell checking that isn't broken? Grammar checking? Help files that don't suck? Howabout OneNote and Visio? Or true support for (like it or not) the most commonly used file formats (docx, xlsx, pptx, etc etc)?

    2. If nvidia and Ati-AMD open-sourced their drivers there would be no reason to have an open-source 2D driver

    Yes, and if Microsoft open sourced Office 2007 there would be no need to have garbage like OpenOffice. Hell, ATI even released the spec for their drivers and there's still a bunch of idiots reinventing the wheel and making new drivers from scratch that don't work.

    3. If your kernel gets updated you may still choose in your boot menu to boot using the old one - didn't you notice that?

    Yes, you can hack around the breaking changes that are thrown in for no good. That's exactly my point; you have to hack and fiddle way too god damn much.

    4. If you update to a newer kernel you should expect for the supported devices coverage to increase rather than decrease (the opposite to Windows)

    The only reason for this is because Linux relies on a mono-kernel design where every driver runs in kernel space. Device support in Vista had little to with kernel so much as the complete re-writing of the sound, wifi, and printing stacks, not to mention the new driver framework.

    You mean that WinXP prior to SP2 (at that point in time) was a better choice? It had poor stability and serious security issues.

    XP is terrible, and I still hate using it (thank god I use 7 RC at work), but I shouldn't have been so blind and should have used it instead of wasting my time dicking around with Linux. Once I realized how good Vista is, I gave up on Linux.

  • What Linux needs to improve for the desktop

    It's not so much the desktop environment, as it is the fact that there are like 4 flawed choices of desktop environment, all of which are flawed in their own unique and annoying way. This is the only thing consistent right across everything in FLOSS/Linux; there are a whole bunch of choices given to you, none of which are any good. Why choose a distro when none of them are really adequate? Why can't there be just one good open-source Microsoft Excel clone, instead of several horrible options? Why does there need to be yet another god damned sound API, or another god awful 2D open-source graphics driver?

    Another problem is the breakage that occurs pretty much constantly. A new kernel point release gets pushed through apt? Something’s going to break, and you're going to spend the requisite hour or two figuring out how to fix it, until you finally find some post on a forum (the 8th you’ve looked at) that solves your problem. Samba get updated? Well odds are the new version makes some small change to the way it reads config files, and suddenly your network shares are open to everyone on the network. Upgrading to a whole new release of Ubuntu of Fedora? Well you'd better hold onto your hats, and hope that wifi, sound, graphics, and flash don't all break at once.

    How about Linux as a platform? How can a developer of a closed source application (say a game) be expected to target Linux, when the core bits in the system gets slaughtered with each point release? Not just the kernel, the core libraries and X11 do the exact same thing. Linux isn't so much a platform as it is a plate of spagatti, that might just run Firefox if it was custom compiled with a whole bunch of hooks for the specific point release of your distro, but don't you dare try to run the binary provided by Mozilla of a new version or you're sure to run into a world of hurt. Yes, if you completely lock down the system and make sure to only update everything very carefully on your own, like on a phone, an ebook reader, or a server, you can get a stable platform to target apps to, but that's nowhere near the reality of Linux on the desktop. Ever tried to run an old game (that is, more than a couple years old) on Linux? I don’t think I was ever able to get Doom 3 to run.

    I abandoned Linux almost 2 years ago because I got tired of the constant fiddling and sacrifices I was making as a user; I had sh*t to do, and after 3 years on that garbage, I gave up, installed Vista, and have never been happier or more productive. The last thing I need is to watch OpenOffice, X, or my newly broken nvidia driver (thanks to some daily update somewhere) crash while I'm in the middle of writing a term paper -- again.

  • Mono getting attacked

    I like Mono; as a .NET developer it gives me another option to deploy my apps to, and it's versitility means it finds life in places that Microsoft's .NET stack will never go (things like Wii or the iPhone).

    Really, there isn't a problem with "widespread concerns about Mono", there's a core group of morons from the Boycott-Novell crowd who are paranoid and misinformed trying to get rid of something for what is essentially software religious reasons. Most of these people aren't even devs, they're just users who are trying to tell devs who give up their free time to work on OSS how to work.

    This post summarizes pretty well why all the anti-mono stuff is just astroturfing on the part of what is really a very small group of crazies: http://www2.apebox.org/wordpress/rants/124/ (edit: didn't realize this same thing was linked in the first post)

  • Chrome 2.0 released

    Still no way to hide that horrible "Show Passwords" button == still not going to use it.

  • Why I Use Linux

    GoddersUK said:

    I've have a linux install on my hdd I use occasionaly and I've been using it for the past few days.

    Do you know what the first thing I noticed when i came back to Windows was?

    Disk activity - Linux, I'm not doing something - it sits there doing nothing. Windows - Disk access (not constant thrashing, but probably a couple of times a minute).

    (note, not and entirely fair comparison as my windows install is used far more than my linux and has a large detritus of software installed on it (inc. the stuff I have in the sys tray).

    The other thing I notice: not having wobbly Windows... makes Windows feel so old

    (except my graphics drivers aren't properly supported by the latest version of the kernel so no compiz for me Sad)

     

    Vista and 7 aggressively fill a memory cache with hard drive pages during non-peak hard drive access in order to reduce hard drive access during peak access. The effect is more hard drive access overall but faster reads and writes.

  • UAC controversy part 132

    I would just like to see a way in Windows 7 to have prompts for all elevation requests, but to have those prompts not bring up the secure desktop. It was just a group policy change in Vista, but there's no such option in 7.