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Discussions

warren warren atom heart mother
  • Nokia report turnaround

    Everyone I show my Lumia 920 to is genuinely impressed by it.  The screen quality, the performance, the feel of the hardware..... people also seem to be very positive towards the "simple boxes" approach as opposed to the highly stylized icons of Android and iOS.

     

  • What's the point of the Surface Pro?

    It's gonna be fun to see people's confused reactions when they compare how many hours of Netflix you can watch on a Pro versus RT tablet (hint: x86 wins power hands down for video).

    I'm not disagreeing with you on the battery life concerns, but this isn't really the target usage for Surface Pro, is it?  Watching that much Netflix in one go usually means you're at home, so you can run a power cable.  No sense in wearing down the battery for no reason beyond a very minor bit of inconvenience.

     

     

  • windows 8 sold 60 millions up today.

    If I have my numbers right, this is more or less on pace to be 15x the pace of Mac OS X sales. 

  • What's the point of the Surface Pro?

    Though, I'm considering just giving the first round a pass and making a decision on the next iteration of Surface (if one does exist). A little unsure of buying something first gen when it's possible that the second gen will be vastly superior (esp. in terms of fixing any nasty issues).

    That's my plan, too.  It sounds like Intel has made some great progress lately in super low-power x86 chips recently so by the end of 2013 I'd expect to see a second-generation Surface Pro that uses a lot less power.  Plus the Windows App Store will be a lot more filled out by then.

  • What's the point of the Surface Pro?

    , wastingtime​withforums wrote

    If you want x86, why would you buy at a premium a device with a 10 inch display, when you could just buy an Ultrabook for less with far more power and a bigger screen? Look what you get for $850:

    http://www.amazon.com/Acer-S3-391-9499-13-3-Inch-Ultrabook-Champagne/dp/B009JXJXAC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1357398557&sr=8-1&keywords=Acer+Aspire+S3+i7&tag=hardfocom-20

    The Acer S3 has a 1366x768 display and weighs 3 lbs.  The Surface Pro has 1920x1280 and weighs less than 2 lbs.  Also, the S3 is being criticised for not having a particularly good screen, whereas the Surface RT has been widely lauded for having an excellent display, so the Surface Pro is bound to be very good as well.

    Those are pretty significant differences, and for some people can justify spending the extra money.  I know for myself I'd refuse to buy a tablet with 1366x768 resolution -- that's less vertical resolution than I had on my Windows 95 desktop in 1996 (!!)  ..... and let's not forget that the iPad offers 2048x1536 resolution. 

  • When Microsoft's design teams were sane....

    Two kinds of applications?

    ..... it's like people forget that there are also console applications in Windows.

    All of this bitching and moaning about Metro reminds me of 1995, when Microsoft started to push DOS into the background in favour of their new "for beginners" Windows 95 interface, with its tacky Start menu (complete with an animation on the taskbar to guide peoples' eyes to the bottom-left corner) and keyboard-hostile file management interface.

    People who'd spent the last 10-15 years working in DOS (the Lotus and Wordperfect crowd, the gamers, the BBSers, and basically everyone else who wasn't using a Mac) bitched, whined, complained, hemmed, hawed, posted screeds on Usenet, etc., but eventually they adjusted to this new interface.  The apps they wanted to use eventually showed up as native Win32 apps, too.  They managed, right?  I guess some of them fled to Unix systems because they didn't like GUIs.  Fine.  But Windows still went on to 95+% market share on the strength of the boldness of the radical changes behind Windows 95.

     

  • Dont give Microsoft your phone number

    Microsoft has had my phone number for a number of years... far back as 2004 at least.... and they've only ever called me for renewing my MSDN or TechNet subscription, or in conjunction with a support request that I initiated.

    *shrug*

    Anyways, you are signing up for a web hosting service.  Them having your phone number could actually work in your favour, in the event that Microsoft detects that your site has been compromised and they need to contact you directly, ASAP.  Plus if it's hosting for your business, well, ummm, isn't it a bit disingenuous to describe their asking for your business's phone number as a "brazen, shameless, intrusion into our personal lives"?

    I mean, come on.... tone down the flaming BS just a little bit there.

     

  • Time for a Win8 Taskforce website like ​Aerotaskfor​ce?

    If you have to scroll to the see your entire Start menu, you're using it wrong.

    This is, of course, exactly the same as the last three versions of Windows, so it shouldn't be a revelation.  The only difference is that it looks different.

    Pin anything you use all the time on the task bar, and remove them from Start.
    Remove other items you don't need to see every day
    All apps are always available through keyboard search and via the All Apps option.

    Oh, and if you want to add more items vertically, go to Start -> Settings -> Tiles -> Show more tiles.

  • How do I rename my Windows 8 laptop, and trusting a PC?

    You can trust multiple PCs on a single Microsoft ID.  It's no big deal.

    As a side note, it's pretty cool that you can just hit Windows + W to do a settings search, type "rename", and easily get to the option to rename the computer.

  • Craig Mundie - head of MSR and TwC resigns

    On the other hand, it's good to retire a bit earlier because (hopefully) you've got a number of fairly healthy years left to go and see the world.  I imagine Mr. Mundie is pretty much set for life, so I hope that's what he does.  The world is too big and too amazing to miss out on it because you're obsessed with working.