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Discussions

William Kempf wkempf
  • Visual Studio 2013 deployment of class library

    I think there's a question in there somewhere, but it's missing. :)

    What do you mean by "deploy onto another machine"? That's very cryptic and so there are numerous answers. The most basic answer is that you simply copy the DLL to the other machine. Really, that's it. Depending on what your purpose is, there's plenty of other answers, though, going all the way up to bundling it as a NuGet package.

  • Net Neutrality has a new champion

    , JohnAskew wrote

    So, back to the point, is this good, bad, or ugly... or all three?

    /me thinks good.

     

    The only one I can say for sure is that it's ugly, though it's likely all three.

    We hate the telcos and cable companies, but they got where they are with the power they have because they were government regulated. Local governments allowed (even encouraged) them to become defacto monopolies, for instance. There's as much chance of government control making things worse as there is for it to make things better. The only thing you know for sure is that it's going to be ugly, because politics are always ugly (just read the comments on this thread already).

    Another way to look at it... things are bad right now because a very few companies have complete control over the Internet. Those are the same companies that are most effective at buying... err... lobbying politicians, so they'll remain in control even if government takes control legally. Cynical, but pretty darn accurate.

    On the flip side, things are bad because we don't have free market competition here. But it's also the free market that allows companies to do what ever they want so long as they have customers willing to buy from them.

    The answer is somewhere in the middle, but it's hard to find. Objectively, I don't know what the answer is. I do believe some regulation is necessary, but it needs to be done with a very light touch... something governments aren't known for.

  • What are the changes that Microsoft is making to the privacy statements?

    I get the concern and the emotional reaction, but honestly, if you don't know what changes were made that means you don't know what terms you had already agreed to and were under. So, the emotion is a bit misplaced.

    I've just read through the link you provided. I don't see anything alarming there, or anything that is likely a big change from the past. It's pretty basic stuff, the same as you'll find for nearly every site, but spelled out in plain English instead of obfuscated legalese.

  • Why no Silverlight or Flash

    , sysrpl wrote

    @wkempf:Oh okay. In my experience frameworks can make things better.

    jQuery makes selectors, measuring DOM structures, and ajax easier.

    GSAP makes tweening css, creating timelines, and animation playback control easier.

    But if you are telling everyone that in your expert opinion the javascript and html stack is hopelessly broken; that all javascript frameworks fail to improve development on that stack by adding power, or flexibility, or ease of use, then I guess you win. Conversation done. I'll send out the mass email telling everyone to stop using it.

    You don't understand what I'm saying, so let me clarify.

    Yes, libraries can make it easier to accomplish specific tasks by doing some of the work for you. There's a reason I'm more proficient using WPF than WinForms, for example. But the problem with the HTML/CSS/JS stack isn't a problem of lack of libraries. While fancy libraries can help, to some degree, the fundamental problem still exists and so while the libraries can make things "easier" they have no hope of making them "easy".

    Languages, on the other hand, like TypeScript, those can make a much bigger difference and "almost" make things easy, because they actually fix one of the flaws in this stack. Even then, though, you're left with other flaws that simply can't be fixed, IMHO. The Browser was designed for documents. It's simply not intended to be a vehicle for running applications. We should stop fighting this fact and accept it. Develop a new system. One as open as HTML but intended for running applications.

  • Why no Silverlight or Flash

    @sysrpl: I meant HTML/CSS/JS. A framework on top of that won't change much here.

  • After upgrading IE8 to IE11, the most important things started to suck

    @fanbaby: I don't get it. I tried those searches in both Google and Bing and get nearly identical results? 

  • Why no Silverlight or Flash

    @sysrpl: I call BS. Just like everything, some things will be incredibly easy. But actually USE this stuff for something significant and then talk to me about how easy it is. I've got lots of experience with this stack of technologies, and I'll laugh in your face if you tell me it's easy.

  • Telerik being sold to progress software

    , vesuvius wrote

    @RealBboy360: This week is already turning out to be pretty dramatic with the Office Everywhere announcement.

    Personally speaking, Telerik, ComponentOne, DevExpress, Infragistics etc and all those types of companies are having to adapt or die as the direction Microsoft is taking is going to drive them out of business anyway, the reality is that there is no third party ecosystem or Partners really anymore for Microsoft.

    Microsoft's future plans are about doing what Telerik, ComponentOne, DevExpress, Infragistics have always done, so those companies are all going to have to seek new business which is competing with Azure.

    The UI frameworks we have been obsessed with as developers through the noughties are no longer the focus for Microsoft, so the aforementioned people that have made money by creating time saving tools can either hang onto their current customer base for the next ten years and see sales steeply declining year on year, especially since most of them are tied to Windows, and that isn't a first class citizen to Microsoft anymore.

    Wha? Windows is still a first class citizen, it's just no longer the only platform they care about. Microsoft isn't now in the business of creating controls anymore than they used to be. Telerik et. al. were never tied solely to Windows as they also provided web controls. The need for controls to improve developer productivity isn't going away in this day and age... in fact it's probably more in demand as there are fewer controls available for the newer web and mobile platforms.

    I didn't understand a thing you just said. :)

  • Microsoft Watch

    Marvel's Agents of Shield is one of those shows that's basically a Microsoft add platform. All phones are Lumias, all "laptops" are Surfaces, etc. In a recent episode they had this.

    msfitnessbandpossible

    (Via Mary Jo Foley/Twitter/Erdim)

    Could that be the rumored watch?

  • Microsoft Watch

    @Bas: If they sell, there must be a leader. But I really don't think you can claim "follow the leader" this time. The recent trend towards wearables is way too new for anyone to be considered "following" here. Heck, this time Microsoft stands a minor chance of being a player ;).