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Discussions

William Kempf wkempf
  • infinite space indefinitely

    http://skydrive.live.com

  • How Did You End Up in Tech?

    I graduated in '92, in Nebraska.  Bad economy, coupled with there being few technical jobs available in the region any way meant it took a long time to find something.  When I did, it was working for a grain mill.  So 70% of my job was non-computer related.  I hated that job, but put up with it for about 2 years.  Then a head hunter contacted me at work with a position writing software to track credit card fraud.  Much better.

  • Warning about new Vista Updates

    W3bbo wrote:
    
    wkempf wrote:
    A reboot resolved the issue.  No clue where it moved the profile to in order to be able to restore it, but it appears to be back to normal.


    It didn't move it. Your "empty" profile was a temporary one used in lieu.


    C:\Users\wekempf held all of my profile before the issue.  After the issue, C:\Users\wekempf was basically empty.  After the reboot, C:\Users\wekempf held all of my files again.  Sorry, the contents were moved somewhere.  It may have all be done via junction points, but I couldn't find the missing contents before the reboot.

  • Warning about new Vista Updates

    A reboot resolved the issue.  No clue where it moved the profile to in order to be able to restore it, but it appears to be back to normal.

  • Warning about new Vista Updates

    Jason Cox wrote:
    Ouch, that's gotta hurt...

    I've installed the updates so far on three Vista machines, two x86 (one of those on a domain) and one x64 and havent seen any problems yet.

    Was there anything weird in the Event Log?


    Why yes, there is.

    Windows cannot load the locally stored profile. Possible causes of this error include insufficient security rights or a corrupt local profile.

    DETAIL - The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process.

    -------

    Windows has backed up this user profile. Windows will automatically try to use the backup profile the next time this user logs on.

    -------

    Windows cannot find the local profile and is logging you on with a temporary profile. Changes you make to this profile will be lost when you log off.

    --------

    I don't see any "backed up" profile anywhere.  The last one makes me concerned that this will now be a repeating loop.

    And no, I don't expect many (any?) other people to have this issue.  But since I don't know what caused it, the warning to backup first seems justified to post here.

  • Warning about new Vista Updates

    I installed the new Vista updates and they appear to have wiped out my user account.  The account is still there, the password still works, but once logged on I see that it's like it's a brand new account.  Everything was wiped out of My Documents.  AppData is cleaned out.  The desktop only contains shared icons, and none of the personal icons I'd placed there.  The start menu no longer has any of my recently executed applications.  My home page was reset.  And on and on and on.  Everything is as if this were a brand new account.

    I can't say for sure that this was caused by the Vista updates, but it occurred after the reboot from the last update, so it seems likely.  I'd just recommend you ensure you have a backup of your documents before applying these updates.

  • Channel8 is cool! Way Cooler than 9.

    This was posted once already several weeks ago.  Like I said then, this is frugly.  Why so many people like it is beyond me.  As a cartoon, it might work.  As a site I'm supposed to use, it blows chunks.

  • Eric Schmidt (Google CEO) Defines Web 3.0

    ScanIAm wrote:
    

    Of course, on the surface, he was correct.  Ultimately, though, you aren't going to download an application to check your bank balance.  You aren't going to download an application to trade stocks.  You aren't going to download an application to shop for widgets.

    The web is perfect for these 'applications'.  Where it falls down is when people see a few AJAX pages and assume that we'll soon be running everything from the web.

    Outlook Web Access is a classic example.  It has a pretty heavy set of features, and the last version I used, while limited, still did much more than you'd expect from a web app.

    That said, though, one minute spent using Outlook.exe, and you realize how much MORE you can get out of a real application.  Plus, I'd bet that if you had to write identical functionality in an app and a web page, the app would take less time, resources, and money.



    I only partially agree with your list of "legitimate web applications" (my summation, not literally a quote from you).

    1.  Check my bank balance.  No, for just that, the web is fine.  But there's a reason Microsoft Money and Quicken still sell.  What *I* would expect is for a lot of the data access to be in web services.  The bank's web site would include a very simplistic view of this data for checking my balance, viewing transactions, and possibly sending out e-payments.  On that same site, I'd love to see an "icon" I can click that starts a rich application that allows me to do all of the things that Quicken and Money are so great for, and that I'd curse a blue storm if I had to do in the browser.

    2.  Trade stocks.  Hmm... not so sure about that one.  Watching a stock ticker and simple trading are one thing, but heavy analysis to do hard core trading probably still needs a richer environment.  So, we're back to my banking scenario here as well.

    3.  Shopping for widgets.  Well, yeah.  That's static content with a cart.  However, as some of the WPF demos showed off, a richer kiosk experience for shopping can be very "cool" and may actually help you to sell products.  Works great on the Web, but may work better as a distributed application.  I'm not sure here.  But I'll give you this one.

    Other than that, I agree with everything you said.

  • Eric Schmidt (Google CEO) Defines Web 3.0

    ScanIAm wrote:
    I had a boss, once, who was making fun of web applications in the late 90s.  He had built his business on PC applications that ran on the client. 

    Anyway, he commented something to the effect that web apps were mainframe apps with pretty graphics on top.

    Of course, he also felt that they'd never catch on


    He was right.  A web application at the time was no different from a Green Screen or dumb terminal, other than it allowed richer text and graphics.  AJAX changed that to some degree, but not much.  I'd also agree with him about it "catching on".  I see little evidence that they've caught on even today.  What has caught on is the distributed nature of web applications.  Being able to run from anywhere, and having simplified deployment is huge.  But who actually likes using them?  The only two I care for are GMail and GReader, both of which are static document forms of applications, which is what the Web was built for.

  • Eric Schmidt (Google CEO) Defines Web 3.0

    Bas wrote:
    My Web 3.0 ditches AJAX, HTTP, HTML, CSS, and javascript entirely, and provides a platform geared entirely towards online applications, instead of shoehorning applications into a platform designed for providing formatted pages of text with limited interactivity.

    Then again, I'm not a CEO, so my opinion is wrong.


    Amen brother!  I was saying this way back in '95 with Web 1.0.  There's a limited number of "applications" that can actually work within the confines of the browser.  Even things like Flash and Silverlight don't change my opinion about that.  Use the browser to find the application (maybe even as your "desktop") but launch the applications locally in their own window with full desktop capabilities.