Hardware hands for Software fingers...

So you've a software dev. You've thought about how cool doing some hobby hardware building and hacking would be, but are not really sure where to start? Eric Lee's recent post might be enough to get your off your... um... to get you going... yeah, that's it. :)

Hardware Hacking For Software Developers

I studied Software Engineering in college.  Most of the major classes were about various software topics, of course, but I was also required to take a couple of hardware/electronics classes where we soldered together transistors and logic gates and such things.  At the time I didn’t particularly enjoy it – software was logical and always worked the same way while hardware was messy and was constantly not working due to bad solder joints or “letting the magic smoke out” or what have you.  Very frustrating.

Fast forward 20 years and I’ve been doing the software thing for a long time.  I’m still passionate about programming and love what I do but I was looking for something new to spend hobby time on.  Preferably something relatively cheap, that I could combine with my interest in amateur science, and that would bring me back to a state of “beginner mind” where I could have fun learning again.  I decided to turn my attention back to the world of electronics to see if it would “take” any better the second time around.

It turns out that the world of hobby electronics is currently in a golden age and it’s amazing!  Between the ocean of free information available on the internet, the fantastic companies that cater to hobbyists, and the wide availability of low-cost, high-quality tools and equipment, there’s never been a better time to get into the hobby.

So you want to hack some hardware?

I’ve been working with this new hobby for about a year now and while I’m certainly no expert, I thought I’d share the results of some of my research to maybe save others some time and to “give back” to the internet community that’s helped me so much.  This post will be a high-level overview of some of the interesting directions in which one can explore, and resources I’ve found to be the most useful.  It’s adapted from a talk I did for the South Sound Developers User Group earlier this year.

As a software developer, it’s pretty easy to ease into the electronics field, starting with high-level things that are comfortably familiar and working your way down to raw electronics with transistors and opamps and stuff.  There are a huge array of options available and I can’t possibly cover them all, so I’ll just describe the journey I took and the results I got.

Microprocessor boards...
Microcontroller boards....
Bare microcontrollers...
Analog circuits...
Tools and resources...
Hobbyist stores and distributors....
Electronic parts and kits...
Multimeter...
Soldering Station....
Power supply...
Oscilloscope....
Blogs...
Circuit simulation...
Go forth and learn!

So that’s a lot of high-level information about how to get started with an electronics hobby.  You’ll notice that I didn’t discuss the “how-to” on anything, but a few web searches should turn up lots of resources for any particular topic that catches your interest.  The most important thing is to actually do something.  Start small, understand and master what you’ve purchased, then move on to the next step.  Personally, I’ve found it to be very rewarding and I hope you will too.

[The post, read it, know it...]

While this post might not turn you into a hardware ninja overnight, everyone has to start somewhere...



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