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Netduino + Bluetooth, Laurent shows us how easy it is...

Bluetooth is everywhere, right? For our Hardware Friday post, I was wondering how hard it would be to add Bluetooth to a .Net Micro Framework, Netduino project?

Laurent Ellerbach shows us how (and it's easier than you might think!)

Adding Bluetooth support to a NETMF board (.NET Microframework)

I recently bought a very cheap Bluetooth adaptor for my Netduino. I wanted to test how easy/hard it is to support Bluetooth. I see lots of advantages with Bluetooth for a near field communication like piloting easily a robot with a Phone without the need of other network or Infrared. Also Bluetooth is a secured communication with a peering.

So I bought this cheap Bluetooth adaptor for $8.20. It does expose itself to the world with a serial port on one side and as a normal Bluetooth device on the other side. Communication is supported with a serial port from one side to the other. On a PC, Phone or whatever device, it creates a serial port. So communication is basically very transparent and assimilated to a serial port from end to end.

...

When I received it, I was impatient to test it. First step was to peer it with a PC. I looked at the documentation and found the default name for this device was “linvor” and found out the passkey was 1234. After cabling it with 3.3V (my board support 3.3V to 12V alimentation) and the ground, and approximately 1 minutes, I peered it!

New step was to write a bit of code to test all this. I decided to do a very basic echo program. So whatever it will receive, it will send it back to the calling program. On the netduino board, I’ll use the COM1 (pins D0 and D1). I found also in less than 1 minute that the default configuration was 9600 bauds, 8 bits, no parity and 1 bit stop. So I wrote this very simple code for the test, very hard to do more basic than that:

image

...

I send couple of commands to test and it worked just perfectly  So I renamed the device to LaurelleBT instead of linvor. As the device was already peered, Windows did not had to reinstall drivers or cut the communication, it was just about changing the displayed name:

image

So that’s it! In 5 minutes I had a working Bluetooth module on my board. I was positively surprised and I’ll buy more for sure! Next step it to mount it on a robot and pilot it from a Windows Phone or Windows 8 device.

See? Easy!

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  • Tyrone  ReddyTyrone Reddy

    Hi there! I am a first year Information
    Technology student and I must
    Say netduino is certainly facinating
    Its flexible and easy and I
    Just can't wait to start my own
    Tinkering! Thanks for sharing
    Your code!

  • This looks great!

     

    What do you think it would take to have two Netduinos communicate over Bluetooth? While a complex messaging protocol is probably out of the question, it would be cool to have Netduino #1 send a byte array to Netduino #2 each time #1 had a particular event occur.

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