Michael Wallent: Advent and Evolution of WPF

Sign in to queue

Description

Tim Sneath, you know him by now as our friendly neighborhood WinFX Technical Evangelist and Channel 9 correspondent, recently sat down with Michael Wallent, General Manager of the WinFX team and one of the people who helped create DHTML, to discuss the history and future of WPF, our next generation Windows presentation platform.  Where did WPF come from? Where does it fit into Web 2.0? These and many more questions are addressed in this excellent interview.

Embed

Download

Download this episode

The Discussion

  • User profile image
    Skriker V1.0
    Great stuff...when you going to be back in UK...miss your presentations at the Edinburgh Roadshows... Smiley
  • User profile image
    Zeo
    Great Background Info.
  • User profile image
    androidi

    Good introduction on history and background of WPF. The first half was very good.

    For some the confirmation about unmanaged and public MIL API 'to replace GDI' may be news. Obviously the GDI will still be there and the perf of latest CPUs doesn't make one miss the lack of hw-acceleration.

  • User profile image
    dmarsh
    The absolute best start to finish explanation of why WPF exists and what it aims to solve I've ever seen/heard.
  • User profile image
    raymond
    Great video, but I am still waiting for Sparkle!
    It has been a very long wait and I am still waiting.

    Suggestions for version release frequency:

    Stand-alone-applications (Internet Explorer): Every Year

    Tools (Visual Studio, Expression Suite): Every Two Years

    Office: Every Three Years

    Window Operating Systems and SQL Server: Every Four Years

    Five and six year waits are inexcusable. 

    Less features-more releases.

    Thank you again for a great interview.

    Raymond

  • User profile image
    AdamKinney
    Thank you Michael, Charles and Tim.  Loved it, blogged it, looking forward to the platform even more now.
  • User profile image
    kostik_y2k
    A greaaat interview, super-interesting stuff
  • User profile image
    littleguru
    DHTML! wow. I did once a web site that build completely on DHTML.

    My approach was very very similar to the current AJAX technology.

    But in that time frame no browser (except IE) understood what I wanted him to do Big Smile I still remember all the exception boxes when loading the site in Netscape or Opera. Netscape even crashed.

    That was fun.
  • User profile image
    sloppycode
    [quote user="sloppycode"]one of the people who helped create DHTML[/quote]

    So he helped create HTML,CSS and Javascript? Quite an achievement! Smiley
  • User profile image
    sloppycode
    charles wrote:
    one of the people who helped create DHTML


    So he helped create HTML,CSS and Javascript? Quite an achievement!
  • User profile image
    erik_
    Great video!

    Nice to hear the background information, and the history of the path the product walks
  • User profile image
    LightRider
    Super!
  • User profile image
    homli
    I can buy Mike's claim that the team found boxes with Windows 2000 installed couldn't be counted on for video acceleration, but don't buy his argument for some of the other WPF/E platforms--particularly Mac OS X.  If he would have claimed resource issues or competitive positioning, I would have believed him.
  • User profile image
    rasx
    I know that it is very difficult not to sound cynical in this age of the smirk but I am freaking serious when I say that this is the guy I wanted to hear from for years. Years! Anyone who has written HTML by hand at least three times for the last decade needs to see this video!

    Nothing
    replaces an excellent discussion of technology in a historical context like this Channel9 post. Everything else is existential doggy bags and sophomoric kiddie plates served in a vacuum.
  • User profile image
    jerry.mead

    Sensible questions from Professor Sneath allow Michael Wallent to recover all of the ground he lost with those dodgy "ActiveX is only used for advertising" pronouncements around the time of EOLAS. If this is the face of Microsoft's current strategic management, then good. Thanks too for "A Big Whatever", now an integral part of our company's lexicon.

Add Your 2 Cents