Microsoft Research: A look at tomorrow’s health solutions today: Part I

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  • User profile image
    John Ellis

    I am a Med Student, my sister has just graduated and started work in hospital this month and my father has been a doctor in the NHS for about 30 years so I think I know a bit about healthcare but honestly this is clutching at straws- some of this technology is great and can obviously be of use in the healthcare setting (although I suspect limited use- e.g. a couple of collaborative surface tables per trust) but it's not enough.

    Nobody out there at the moment has really struck at what is needed in the health services at the moment in technology and the existing systems (I know from using them) are either antiques or incredibly inelegant solutions that a tech saavy person can use but complicate matters for the less technically capable. Some hospitals use systems here that are from 1992 and they're "planning" upgrades, they aren't past planning yet- it's a joke, if MS wants the large organisations (and health wise the NHS is a big catch) to part with their resources it cannot be for niches that aren't needed to be filled yet, these wonderful ideas won't get anywhere for a long time because we in the health care systems are still trying to overcome 16 year old problems- make solutions for the smaller things and then move on to these brilliant visions!!!

  • User profile image
    John Ellis

    I am a Med Student, my sister has just graduated and started work in hospital this month and my father has been a doctor in the NHS for about 30 years so I think I know a bit about healthcare but honestly this is clutching at straws- some of this technology is great and can obviously be of use in the healthcare setting (although I suspect limited use- e.g. a couple of collaborative surface tables per trust) but it's not enough.

    Nobody out there at the moment has really struck at what is needed in the health services at the moment in technology and the existing systems (I know from using them) are either antiques or incredibly inelegant solutions that a tech saavy person can use but complicate matters for the less technically capable. Some hospitals use systems here that are from 1992 and they're "planning" upgrades, they aren't past planning yet- it's a joke, if MS wants the large organisations (and health wise the NHS is a big catch) to part with their resources it cannot be for niches that aren't needed to be filled yet, these wonderful ideas won't get anywhere for a long time because we in the health care systems are still trying to overcome 16 year old problems- make solutions for the smaller things and then move on to these brilliant visions!!!

  • User profile image
    Bill Crounse, MD

    Northerngeek,

    Thanks for your comment.  The video programs I do with Microsoft Research are meant to stimulate the imagination of clinicians and developers around the world.  For instance, two years ago we looked at the early development of what has since become a commercial product known as Surface computing.  Over the course of the next few years, you will see Surface applications become quite common in healthcare.

    I practiced medicine for 20 years in Seattle prior to joining Microsoft.  In fact, there are now at least a dozen physicians working at the company.  While I wouldn't disagree with you on the current state of the industry (not only in the UK), I want you to know that we are working hard to develop the more contemporary, powerful,  lower-cost, easier to use solutions that you and I both know the healthcare industry needs.  We are investing hundreds of millions of dollars to pave the way for this next generation of solutions.

    Thanks again for your comment.  This industry (healthcare) needs more enthusiastic, questioning, curious young clinicians like you.  Keep up the good work.

    Bill Crounse, MD
    Senior Director, Worldwide Health
    Microsoft

  • User profile image
    Bill Crounse, MD

    Northerngeek,

    Thanks for your comment.  The video programs I do with Microsoft Research are meant to stimulate the imagination of clinicians and developers around the world.  For instance, two years ago we looked at the early development of what has since become a commercial product known as Surface computing.  Over the course of the next few years, you will see Surface applications become quite common in healthcare.

    I practiced medicine for 20 years in Seattle prior to joining Microsoft.  In fact, there are now at least a dozen physicians working at the company.  While I wouldn't disagree with you on the current state of the industry (not only in the UK), I want you to know that we are working hard to develop the more contemporary, powerful,  lower-cost, easier to use solutions that you and I both know the healthcare industry needs.  We are investing hundreds of millions of dollars to pave the way for this next generation of solutions.

    Thanks again for your comment.  This industry (healthcare) needs more enthusiastic, questioning, curious young clinicians like you.  Keep up the good work.

    Bill Crounse, MD
    Senior Director, Worldwide Health
    Microsoft

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