Patterns and Practices - A Team of Thieves

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  • User profile image
    Massif
    OK, so we get to work in big open offices and collaborate a bit here in the UK. But no-one would let me write on the walls.

    The most productive environment I've worked in was when we were forced to use a single PC (because it was the only thing connected to the £100,000 odd machine.) Of course, having the project manager pacing up and down behind you trying to figure your problem can be motivating for other reasons than collaboration.
  • User profile image
    DonXML
    Is it just me, or does Peter look like Kerry King from the band Slayer?  He is just missing the tattoos.
  • User profile image
    msivers
    Enjoyed this very much and I agree Rory it is one of the your best interviews (although I've enjoyed most of them!).

    I was particularly interested to hear how a team of architects, coders, testers and product/program managers work closely together in such a continual way and the benefits that result.

    Really enjoyed this piece and it has convinced me that a more agile development approach can bring real benefits and productivity.

    Keep up the good work!

  • User profile image
    Rory
    DonXML wrote:
    Is it just me, or does Peter look like Kerry King from the band Slayer?  He is just missing the tattoos.


    Don!

    Don!

    Don!

    (That's all - just excited to see you here, dawgg Smiley ).
  • User profile image
    Rory
    msivers wrote:
    Enjoyed this very much and I agree Rory it is one of the your best interviews (although I've enjoyed most of them!).


    Thanks Smiley

    They were especially good talkers, though. They had their act together, you know?

    msivers wrote:
    I was particularly interested to hear how a team of architects, coders, testers and product/program managers work closely together in such a continual way and the benefits that result.


    Same - but I didn't realize it until the interview really got going. Like I said, I just wanted to hang out with Peter, but then I found out that his job is, like, freakishly interesting, and now I want to go back. Both to do a video showing their work in action, and also to interview CHRIS TAVARES (yeah, Chris - I've got my peepers on you) about Enterprise Library.

    msivers wrote:
    Really enjoyed this piece and it has convinced me that a more agile development approach can bring real benefits and productivity.


    My feelings are pretty much the same. Even though I was on the other side of the camera, my reaction is about the same as yours. I had never seen real world benefits of agile development, and I was really impressed with what I saw.

    msivers wrote:
    Keep up the good work!


    I have to, or else they'll fire me.

    Thanks, though Smiley
  • User profile image
    iknovate

    At position 10:54 Edward says "we call it the...hack". What exactly did he say?Embarassed

  • User profile image
    iknovate
    Rory, you mentioned a 'lack of ego'. Language is interesting. I just got done with a rather extensive email to a colleague who has problems with the word 'judgement' when instead he has a problem with the term 'negative judgement' (just as the word 'discrimination' has taken the place of 'negative discrimination' -- discrimination is simply a means of choice).

    These guys don't lack ego in the least. Indeed, the energy that is here is due to that ego. It is simply a 'sure ego' and not a 'feigned ego'. 'Feigned ego' is fueled by 'fake energy' -- it cannot be sustained without a lot of effort. The natural energy of this conversation is effortless.

    I only elaborate this because this is a critical axiom of relevant design -- follow the natural energy, it requires less effort.

    [BTW...the group hug at the end is classic!]
    I've immortalized the interview in text.

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