Learn foundational IT skills

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Description

We know and you know: Working in IT often means little time for much else. You like to keep up with the latest releases, technology trends, and evolving threats, but with work piling up, this can be difficult. Even worse, when you can make time to find out what's new in IT, you often have to waste it sifting through a sea of unreliable content.

And that is exactly what The Ops Team is here to fix.

We realize you want to hear from people who actually know their stuff: real IT people, the engineers building the solutions, and other highly technical minds. So when The Ops Team creates videos, blogs, demos, and a whole bunch more, we like to follow a few simple rules:

  1. Make it technical
  2. Make it useful
  3. Make it quick 

For a quick preview of some of the things our team gets to work on, check out the below interview between Jeffrey Snover and Matt McSpirit, two of the coolest technologists in the world chatting about the why you'll love Windows Server 2016 and Nano Server.

Here are some examples of the awesome stuff The Ops Team has created. And be sure to follow our blog to always stay current with the latest in technology.

 

Shows

This is one of our favorite formats. Our shows are a great way to connect with people, both inside and outside of Microsoft. Shows vary from detailing how the latest release impacts IT to diving into a hands-on demo. You're sure to find something relevant to your work among them:

  • On The Endpoint Zone, Brad Anderson teams up with Simon May to focus on Enterprise Mobility Management. They'll show how you can maintain control as the workforce becomes increasingly mobile.
  • With DevOps now one of technology's biggest trends, you can turn to DevOps Dimension to find out what this is and how it relates to you. See examples of how companies use DevOps to find solutions. Thanks, DevOps!
  • Our buddy Rick Claus, though no longer on the team, still loves getting behind the camera. On Tuesdays with Corey, he and the awesome Corey Sanders cover all thing Azure, typically in under 10 minutes and often involving white boarding. And on Patch and Switch, Rick and Joey Snow discuss ... a lot of stuff. You need to experience this one for yourself—it's always fun.
  • Simon May teams up again, this time with our Azure AD engineers to bring you the latest in identity management on Azure AD + Identity. If you still believe single sign-on is impossible and you're powerless to protect your organization from the next data breach, then this show's for you.

Series

Series are similar to shows, though a series typically dives deeper into a specific topic, usually for a certain length of time. Think of them as the next step after you've watched our shows and figured out which mountains you want to move. Here are a few to keep things moving:

  • If DevOps Dimension helps you understand what DevOps means, then DevOps Fundamentals is here to take you through all of the key DevOps components, like Release Management, Continuous Integration/Deployment and Automated Testing. We think we didn't say DevOps enough here. DevOps.
  • Sticking to the theme of awesome new technology that may be vaguely understood yet critically important: Containers. Working in technology means there are many hands and dependencies to make things happen, which can be a management nightmare. Containers help standardize delivery across diverse environments, meaning that your software will work exactly as intended.
  • In a similar vein to Containers, Nano Server presents a much lighter weight and more flexible way to manage your operations, available as part of Windows Server 2016. Requiring less patching, using resources more efficiently, and improving security mean fewer things to go wrong for you.

Demos

Less talking, more doing. Learn exactly what steps to take to proceed with the topics we discuss on our shows and series.

  • Back to those mobile devices again, the How to: Control the Uncontrolled series walks you through the steps required to finally take control of the ticking time bombs your users call smart phones, while actually improving their access and productivity.
  • Just want to get started with some new cool stuff but not sure how? In the Pit Stop Series, we walk through how you can quickly get started on some common scenarios across Azure, Enterprise Mobility Suite, and Operations Management Suite. In (generally) fewer than five minutes, learn how to set up and connect to VMs (even Linux!), establish email file-level control, and create data logs and dashboards.

Blogs/Social

Last but not least, blogs and various social channels offer another way to quickly stay up with the latest technology happenings.

  • To the north, Anthony Bartolo, Pierre Roman and friends keep the Can IT Pro blog running. Similar to our blog, they cover the wide subset of technologies discussed here, just with a slightly different accent.
  • As part of Brad Anderson's "In the Cloud" blog, Controlling the Uncontrollable outlines the key components of mobile device management (MDM, for the cool kids). This includes enforcing better device security, deploying and protecting email, and setting up self-service device enrollment. You may remember similar topics from a certain demo series above.
  • In The Ops Team blog post (how meta), we mentioned the awesome IT guys we get to hang out with every day who created The Ops Team (Matt, Simon, Rick, and David). We also can't forget about Thiago, Oguz, and Volker. And, right, we should also mention our Twitter.
  • Finally, it's been way too long since we've written "DevOps". And speaking of DevOps, Julien Stroheker put together an incredible post that details a great list of resources. Much better than what we could have done.
  • [Edit: Double finally, I forgot about the Twitter list of my favorite IT people at Microsoft I created, as well as Docs.com, which has decks and stuff that you can download]

 

*Phew* Quite the list, but huge thanks for your commitment in making it this far. It means you're the kind of person we were hoping we'd find. The good news is that, while we may still venture into a diatribe or two, in the future we'll generally keep it short. We just haven't had any one place to capture all the awesome stuff the team's been working on. Now we do, and if you subscribe to our blog you can make sure to have our latest updates delivered straight to your Inbox. And if you're ready to learn more right now, check out our next post, where we cover some of our favorite ways to dive deeper, including MVA training courses, evaluations, Virtual Labs conferences, and other in-person events.

The Discussion

  • User profile image
    Granville

    Great site.
    I would love to learn more.

  • User profile image
    Ferney Badid Cruz

    Hola buenos dias estoy interesado en saber mas del tema pero me gustaria escucharlo en español ya que no domino el ingles. Muchas gracias.

    Ferney Badid Cruz Rodriguez

  • User profile image
    msrt

    Por favor, no podría estar toda la información traducida al castellano.
    Gracias.

  • User profile image
    antor

    De qué nos vale una campaña de email marketing en español si luego cuando vamos a profundizar nos muestra la información en ingles?

  • User profile image
    Azan

    Nice to see you

  • User profile image
    MAR

    estoy de acuerdo con todos , translate to spanish lenguaje , please

  • User profile image
    CARLOS NASCIMENTO

    translate to spanish language and portuguese brasil.

  • User profile image
    Thaylor Mosquera Castro

    translate to spanish

  • User profile image
    murat

    Translate to Turkish

  • User profile image
    Raimundo​Matos

    It's looks like interesting I will test in practice so I'll can better assess

  • User profile image
    Eng Faisal

    Thank you
    Useful information..

  • User profile image
    bakalakadak​ah

    translate to durkastanik

  • User profile image
    Anu

    Thanks, for valuable information.

  • User profile image
    JOURNEYTOCO​ME

    THIS IS A STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION CONGRATS FINALLY Y'ALL ARE GETTING IT 

  • User profile image
    PieterMS

    Looks good. Please keep it short. Not too much text. Just the facts.

  • User profile image
    Van hoecke

    heb problemen met moederbord typen , en internet krijg steeds de melding foutcode: 0x8004010F waardoor internet raar begint te doen , ik kan niet meer normaal internetten, firefox springt naar google en omgekeerd als ook internet en het beeld word na 3 dagen volledig wit na iets te hebben getypt om een web te bekijken, dit is soms zeer moeilijk.
    ken niets van computer, ken geen hulp bereiken door het probleem kan ook geen micrsoft fix it hulp vragen door een code op scherm.

  • User profile image
    ANSHUMMAN

    content seems great but i was busy being pissed with the buffering of video. If that is fixed i loved it.

  • User profile image
    ahmad

    i'm ready

  • User profile image
    Lander

    Estoy interesado en saber mas del tema pero me gustaría escucharlo en español ya que no domino el ingles. Muchas gracias y buen trabajo.

  • User profile image
    meryame

    Great

  • User profile image
    Nicola

    Poderia traduzir para português.

  • User profile image
    Nitelet Paul

    Bonjour
    Nous sommes français ayer la politesse d'écrire dans notre langue
    Merci
    Bonne Journée
    Amicalement
    Nitelet

  • User profile image
    Breno Guerra

    Gostaria de em português em texto mais explicativo.

  • User profile image
    abdellah sbai

    j'ai rien compris
    ecrire en francais

  • User profile image
    suzana

    Ready for good conversazione

  • User profile image
    Sonival Laurindo de Souza

    Please translate to spanish language and portuguese Brasil.

  • User profile image
    Eduardo S

    Por favor, enviar en castellano.

  • User profile image
    ODel

    Please guys, Some of you have to be a bit patient.
    No doubt that Ops creators have already thought about other languages.
    Attending to that, don't wait after what you can receive, but after what you can do and give !
    Firstly, may be learning English ... ? Till you aren't any expert, you got many tools for online translation. Microsoft gave you some, and also Google, Bing, Babel ... aso.
    What ? it's easy for english people to hold such words ? .....
    Sorry, I'm just a poor Frenchy :)
    Anyways, thank you, the Ops Team, for your work ! You rock !!!

     

  • User profile image
    fernando

    lo ideal es que lo realizaran en espanol para poder tener un mejor enrendimiento d ela informacion . gracias

  • User profile image
    a3bplus

    It was great to get a Recap on where the Team is going and where they see the processes moving forward from all the different angles and corners.  I look forward to keeping up to speed and most importantly getting the necessary skill sets to progress along with the Team.  I look forward to the journey, and how these processes fit into my business direction. 

  • User profile image
    DragonKnight

    Can i found translate to arabic. ..

  • User profile image
    Hye CL

    Estoy interesada en saber más del tema pero me gustaría escucharlo en español Muchas gracias.!saludos¡

  • User profile image
    bacito

    woow super

  • User profile image
    Paul Kelly

    Your subscribe to our blog link just goes to a page of text!!!

  • User profile image
    Taggart70

    Доброго времени суток!!! Ваша затея, мне, нравится, но можно ли перевести всё на русский язык, мой английский сильно хромает. Заранее Вам благодарен, и хорошей вам жизни!!!

  • User profile image
    Jan Loimand

    You really need to start listening to the application administrators and the end-users...

    Yes, a lot of new software is really cool, but keeping up with 'Foundational IT Skills' has become a major challenge (problem?) for many, if not most users.

    One of the most important, if not most important 'Foundational Skill' is learning the OS.

    I am not a programmer, but I have worked with IT departments on various applications, and what I required was rarely what they initially proposed.

    Changing the user interface unless absolutely necessary should be avoided at all costs. Changing the user interface means that the end-users require training, and training can be very expensive.

    IT personnel probably spend a lot of their personal time staying up to date, but most end-users are employees who expect to be paid when on the job.

    Microsoft is as guilty of continually changing a user interface as any other IT company.

    As Windows evolved from 2000 to XP to Vista to 7 to 8 to 10, ‘someone’ decided it would be a good idea to rename ‘tools’, rearrange the location of items on toolbars or the ribbon, or place previously available options in a location that has no logic.

    For example, Windows ‘Color and Appearance’ is under ‘Color’, even though most of the options have to do with appearance, not color. I forget where this option was in 2000 or XP, but why is it a challenge to find it in Windows 7?

    The same could be said for what are probably the most widely used Office applications; Word, Excel and Outlook. These are the basic applications that most employees are expected to be familiar with, but the user interfaces have undergone numerous changes.

    It is true that the programs are much more powerful than they were twenty years ago, but how many users actually harness or integrate the additional capabilities into their daily work?


    My perception is that within the IT community there is a belief that ‘change’ equates to ‘progress’. Change that does not improve the end-user experience is not much better than ‘rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic’.


    It is possible, because I have seen it done, to dramatically improve the appearance of a user interface without having to re-train the end-users. Likewise, the program capabilities were dramatically improved for advanced users of the program without changing the regular user interface.


    The end-users should be represented, i.e., be ‘at the table’ when software is undergoing design or redesign. Changes that may be ‘cool’ to programmers may seem nonsensical to end-users that will have to work with the application on a daily basis for what will probably be an extended period of time.

    Jan Loimand

  • User profile image
    Bobby Visser

    Your perception is very limited as all new software version have beta testing done where end-user requests are noted and efficiency in usage is one of the main factors ... people are inherently lazy to learn new things and get stuck in ruts ... I personally abhor both iOS and Android, for instance, because I've embraced the efficiency of Windows 10, having taken the time to learn it ... don't wait to be spoon=fed ... feed yourself ... chage is always progress to the open mind!!!

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