Scott Guthrie - Talking ASP.NET and IIS 7.0

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Description

Scott Guthrie is the Product Unit Manager in charge of the Web platform and tools team. That's the team that includes ASP.NET and Internet Information Server. Basically if you run a Web site that runs on Microsoft technology you're probably using the stuff that Scott's teams develop.

They are in the middle of working on the next version of IIS (7.0) and ASP.NET so we thought we'd drop in for a chat. First half of the chat is here. Second half will come next week.

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ASP.NET, IIS

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    The Discussion

    • User profile image
      Charles
      It's important to realize that the ASP.NET team has been the greatest (and earliest) adopter of .NET inside our walls and are true champions of the CLR. Much kudos to the ASP.NET team for what they've done with CLR-based technology. The feedback they've pumped back to the CLR team since very early on has benefited all of us today.

      Can you guess how much of ASP.NET is written in C#? You'll find out in the second clip, but go ahead and guess.


      Thanks,

      Charles
    • User profile image
      DouglasH
      Any hint on what the Client implentation of IIS 7.0 is going to be like??

      Right now IIS 5.1 is worthless from a client perspective. run into its limitations with one user and doing quick starts.

      for personal use would be nice to have a slightly more robust platform with eyes that it can move to a server.

      better yet give us a Home Server platform that we can use:)
    • User profile image
      harumscarum
      Charles wrote:

      Can you guess how much of ASP.NET is written in C#?


      90%?

      It is too bad that iis6 only came on server 2003. I think a lot of developers have been left out since it does not run on xp.
    • User profile image
      rasx

      For those who would say (like the senior George Bush) that guys like me are “happy saying something negative,” you guys have forgotten how much I gush over Scott Guthrie. I’ve got nothing bad to say about this guy. The work of his team speaks for itself. That he would actually say ‘XHTML’ places him alone among the great ‘next generation’ Microsoft employees.

      Scott is still talking about being standards compliant when this mantra seems to escape most Microsoft users and employees who are trying to ‘keep it real.’ When I hear Scott talking about standards compliance, I am hearing a professional realize that like Jeffrey Veen web pages are publications that need style guides and standard syntax—just like any traditional publication.

      Most guys are slobs and they just want to get the job done in two minutes or less. Guys like Scott make my two minutes count—and we don’t come off as slobs.

      Keep my Channel 9 comments positive by bringing in more SQL Server folks, Don Box (of course) and some history about Microsoft Word (find an old timer from the Microsoft Word team—since clearly the new guys are too busy to go online).

    • User profile image
      rhm
      I wonder if the ASP.NET team realise who many potential developers have completely ignored ASP.NET because of the name. When I've spoken to web developers about server-side technology it's apparent a lot of them think that ASP.NET is just a .NET-ified version of classic ASP, i.e. that it's essentially the same thing and just uses C# instead of vbscipt.

      Of course a lot of them are PHP fanatics that probably wouldn't switch to a Windows-based technology anyway, but I do get the impression that because PHP is so good at what it does they are blinded to the possibility that something else could be better. I mean PHP takes the old "embed code in your webpages" idea that started with Coldfusion and was popularised by ASP and does it to perfection, but it's still based on an old and pretty simplistic execution model. What ASP.NET with seperating code from page layout and allowing componentisation of code is such a nice way to work by comparison  it does my head in that people ignore it because its got those three letters ASP in the name. Bad marketting decision in my view.
    • User profile image
      dbates

      I seen Scott do a demo of Whidbey in Reading (UK) last year, was by far the best technical presentation I’ve seen.

       

      C9 show us a video of Scott making a blog reader with no lines of code!!

    • User profile image
      scobleizer

      We'll get more demos with the ASP.NET team and Scott. Thanks!

    • User profile image
      scottgu
      Hi Doug,

      Our plan is to enable IIS7 to work on the client and server.  We are also looking to change some of the limitations previous versions have had on client-platforms to make it a more full-featured offering.

      Hope this helps,

      Scott
    • User profile image
      DouglasH
      scott,

      yes it does. thanks.

      can't wait to play with it:)

      Douglas
    • User profile image
      dotnetjunkie
      This video ranks very high in my all-time-favorites on Channel9 !!!

      Thank you so much Scott for your clear and interesting explanation about the new IIS and ASP.NET Whidbey.

      I actually took notes while watching the video and am so excited to tell about all this stuff to my colleagues and other web developers that I know.

      I can hardly wait for more videos about IIS7 and ASP.NET v2!  Keep them coming! Smiley

      By the way, when can we expect to get our hands on a first beta of IIS 7.0?  The new configuration model is something that I would kill for because we have to manage so many applications in hosted environments. That and all the other cool features of IIS7 that Scott talked about make me wanting to play with it right away!
    • User profile image
      staceyw
      Thanks Scott!  That was a great video.  All the stuff your doing with components and xml config and api config seem so natural and much welcomed.  I never really understood the metabase anyway.  And having all access via managed code is going to be fantastic. 

      Thanks again,

      William
    • User profile image
      staceyw
      100% ?  Any unsafe code?

      --William
    • User profile image
      dmarsh
      harumscarum wrote:
      It is too bad that iis6 only came on server 2003. I think a lot of developers have been left out since it does not run on xp.

      It doesn't? Hmmm... that's funny all of our developers run WinXP Pro and develop ASP.NET applications all day long. Smiley

      All you need to do is install the framework and that should configure IIS automatically assuming you had it installed when you installed the framework. If you didn't have IIS installed when you installed the framework then you need to go to the framework directory (should be %WINDOWS%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v1.1.4322) and run aspnet_regiis.

      HTH,
      Drew
    • User profile image
      W3bbo
      scottgu wrote:
      Hi Doug,

      Our plan is to enable IIS7 to work on the client and server.  We are also looking to change some of the limitations previous versions have had on client-platforms to make it a more full-featured offering.

      Hope this helps,

      Scott


      Hey Scott... can you PLEASE add Content-Negotiation, Language-Negotiation, and URI Rewriting in IIS? I've constantly emailed the "Make a Wish" page and the product suggestion pages with no response... so can I hear from you now? Wink
    • User profile image
      DouglasH
      Drew,

      Yes IIs 5.1 is on XP. and yes you can develop using the platform.

      The issue I run into is the 10 connection limit, Feel less than that some times. and the difference in configurations between IIS 5.1 and IIS 6.0.

      I guess the main issue is loading up 5 or 6 of the same quick starts and getting the connection limit error and about the only way to clear it out is to restart the service.

      personally for development. I much prefer the file system testing in Whidbey. hoping that IIS 7.0 offers that as a choice. even if it is in the virtual directories.

      Douglas
    • User profile image
      harumscarum
      I am not concerned with asp.net and iis I was refering to the fact that I can not duplicate iis6 on my xp machine. This means for any testing I have to use a seperate machine or vpc to understand how an application might work on iis6/2003.

      The ablitily to save all iis7 settings to a config file sounds very cool. A client can send their configuration to us instead of wondering how their configuration differs from ours.

      Good video. I am looking foward to the new and improved renders of asp.net web controls.
    • User profile image
      CSharp​Friends
      Great video.

      Now I have to watch Part II just to find out about the % of C# code....
    • User profile image
      madhead
      In reply to rhm

      Isn't it just the fact that PHP is very much more a cross platform technology rather than anything else? Your Marketing people would keep quite about that bit wouldn't they? Unless of course you are secretly working on the MONO project? LOL!


    • User profile image
      madhead
      So basically you are writing another version of Apache server? Text based configuration and more fine grained control both with the configuration and models. Maybe it would be cheaper to just use Apache.
    • User profile image
      scottgu
      Actually you'll find there are a lot more feature than Apache, and several scenarios that are not possible today with Apache.  A few specific web-server benefits that IIS7 will have over Apache 2.x:

      1) Richer process isolation management and control
      2) Richer command-line scripting and admin model
      3) Rich admin tool (Apache has none)
      4) Richer real-time diagnostics and tracing support
      5) Multi-protocol activation (to enable web-service scenarios like queing)
      6) Better performance

      ASP.NET obviously provides some benefits as well -- the list above just compares the web-server pieces.

      Hope this helps,

      Scott
    • User profile image
      GloP
      DouglasH wrote:
      Drew,
      I guess the main issue is loading up 5 or 6 of the same quick starts and getting the connection limit error and about the only way to clear it out is to restart the service.
      Douglas



      Douglas,

      this is because you have "keep-alive" enabled on the server. As you make connection IE keeps them open and you run in this problem. To be able to develop on XP pro without any issue, just turn off keep-alive in IIS and you'll never (whithin reason) have to restart the service or even run into the limit as a single user on a developpement box.
    • User profile image
      Rossj
      scottgu wrote:

      3) Rich admin tool (Apache has none)


      There are actually several - choice is a good thing Smiley

    • User profile image
      asharism
      did you ever try out 'iisreset' at you command prompt?
    • User profile image
      medetcafe

      Generic Comment Image Generic Comment Image Generic Comment Image

      We'll get more demos with the ASP.NET team and Scott. Thanks!

    • User profile image
      phentermine 37.

      Interesting article, Thanks!

    • User profile image
      Sohbet

      En güzel http://www.chatlobi.com yeri, http://www.chatlobi.com

    • User profile image
      Sohbet

      Sohbet

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