Ward Cunningham - Is there a revolution coming in the way people communicate?

Download this episode

Download Video

Description

Ward Cunningham, architect on the pag team here at Microsoft, sees the world of communication changing rapidly. He talks about blogs, coder inspiration, Wikis, and more.

Do you see a revolution coming in the way people communicate with each other? Particularly the way developers share ideas?

Embed

Format

Available formats for this video:

Actual format may change based on video formats available and browser capability.

    The Discussion

    • User profile image
      ipattern
      I do not see the Revolution per say, but I do see clear open willess of developers to share their code with the world. Blogs has been an interesting enviroment where people share not only their code, but their general thought of direction. It is always about the Information and when the flow of Information becomes free and easy then great break thought are about to happen!

      Maxim

      [www.ipattern.com do you?]
    • User profile image
      jj
      I agree on the revolution thing Maxim highlights. I think coding will be less important in the future. It's will be more about application ideas.

      One time I heard someone said something about systems that you only have to tell WHAT to do, and not HOW to do it.

      Jelle
    • User profile image
      Steve411
       
        Ward Cunningham, architect on the pag team here at Microsoft, sees the world of communication changing rapidly. He talks about blogs, coder inspiration, Wikis, and more.
        


      hehe, you guys forgot the "e" on 'page'
    • User profile image
      sbc
      It is actually PAG (Patterns & Practices Group)
    • User profile image
      siri
      Ward is fast becoming one of my heroes.  I love the discussion of expressive code he begins.  It gels perfectly, in my mind, with the Robert Hess' comment that the biggest problem with teaching programmers is that they get used to writing sloppy code. 

      I write sloppy code because, as Ward says, I become reluctant to improve it once it works.  And if I never do that I will by definition rarely write truely expressive and elegant code.  So by spending my time almost exclusively producing first draft code, I nurture the habit of writing crappy code.

      Ward seems to have a lot of interesting (and inspiring) things to say about the philosophy of programming.  I wish I worked at microsoft so he could be my mentor.  Perhaps more videos from him might console me?

    Comments closed

    Comments have been closed since this content was published more than 30 days ago, but if you'd like to send us feedback you can Contact Us.