Plasma TVs! Is it the end?

The Discussion

  • User profile image
    Matthew Mushall

    No, I cannot offer a solid reason to buy a plasma over an LCD.  Until a year ago, plasmas were great for offering the highest picture quality and strongest colors at smaller sizes, but LCDs are really improving...and the prices are diving.  I plan on adding something above fifty inches to my gaming pad next year, but I'm undecided.  I've found it really helps to go out and look at televisions in action; online reviews can't show you what you'll be looking at.

    While I'll avoid giving you any specific models, my advice would be to go for an ultra-thin LCD display...or suggest that to any parties interested in giving you a pleasant holiday gift.

    Then again...you could wait a year for the laser televisions, but until then you're better off with a reasonably priced high quality LCD smaller than fifty inches.

  • User profile image
    Matthew Mushall

    No, I cannot offer a solid reason to buy a plasma over an LCD.  Until a year ago, plasmas were great for offering the highest picture quality and strongest colors at smaller sizes, but LCDs are really improving...and the prices are diving.  I plan on adding something above fifty inches to my gaming pad next year, but I'm undecided.  I've found it really helps to go out and look at televisions in action; online reviews can't show you what you'll be looking at.

    While I'll avoid giving you any specific models, my advice would be to go for an ultra-thin LCD display...or suggest that to any parties interested in giving you a pleasant holiday gift.

    Then again...you could wait a year for the laser televisions, but until then you're better off with a reasonably priced high quality LCD smaller than fifty inches.

  • User profile image
    Ted Bracewell

    Prices are plummeting quickly. As a gamer I have to have an HD with these new systems. I'll hopefully buy one this year if I have any money left over after getting a PS3.

  • User profile image
    Ted Bracewell

    Prices are plummeting quickly. As a gamer I have to have an HD with these new systems. I'll hopefully buy one this year if I have any money left over after getting a PS3.

  • User profile image
    Ted Bracewell

    I'm no expert on HDTVs. My dad has a plasma and it does look incredible, but I've heard rumors that plasma's burn out quicker than LCDs and they also suffer from burn in on the screen. My dad has had his for about a year and a half now and it's perfect, so who knows? Recently I spoke to a salesman about HDs and he said if you're gonna go with a TV above 42 inches a plasma is better, but below you should go with an LCD. It's really up in the air to me.

  • User profile image
    Ted Bracewell

    I'm no expert on HDTVs. My dad has a plasma and it does look incredible, but I've heard rumors that plasma's burn out quicker than LCDs and they also suffer from burn in on the screen. My dad has had his for about a year and a half now and it's perfect, so who knows? Recently I spoke to a salesman about HDs and he said if you're gonna go with a TV above 42 inches a plasma is better, but below you should go with an LCD. It's really up in the air to me.

  • User profile image
    Matthew Mushall

    Plasmas used to suffer from hard burn-ins, but they are much better now...to the point where they don't unless you're really careless.  While they're grand for anything smaller than fifty inches, they consume between two or three times the power of other models the same size.  That was justifiable until this year when LCDs reached true color and contrast status.  Now, they are in danger of market fallout.  They just aren't worth it for the money anymore.

  • User profile image
    Matthew Mushall

    Plasmas used to suffer from hard burn-ins, but they are much better now...to the point where they don't unless you're really careless.  While they're grand for anything smaller than fifty inches, they consume between two or three times the power of other models the same size.  That was justifiable until this year when LCDs reached true color and contrast status.  Now, they are in danger of market fallout.  They just aren't worth it for the money anymore.

  • User profile image
    SuperBfred

    Hello,

    I did test several LCD,Plasma screens and choose for a pioneer plasma 50inch . In term of color,brighness plasma has no competition....Colors look just natural....

    Newest LCDs like bravia or philips have more pixels but feature flawed video processor and bad response time.

    Burn in is indeed the weak point.....but large LCD also suffer from this problem although in a lesser degree...

    use star wars of test DVD over HDMI and you will find out that a black is never black on any LCD....it will be fixed in the future with SED or OLED ,etc...

    In the meantime I would advice high end Pioneer machine.

  • User profile image
    SuperBfred

    Hello,

    I did test several LCD,Plasma screens and choose for a pioneer plasma 50inch . In term of color,brighness plasma has no competition....Colors look just natural....

    Newest LCDs like bravia or philips have more pixels but feature flawed video processor and bad response time.

    Burn in is indeed the weak point.....but large LCD also suffer from this problem although in a lesser degree...

    use star wars of test DVD over HDMI and you will find out that a black is never black on any LCD....it will be fixed in the future with SED or OLED ,etc...

    In the meantime I would advice high end Pioneer machine.

  • User profile image
    Chris Fisk

    I'm not sure how viable an anonymous person's opinion would be regarding a purchasing decision but, in my experience, DLP and LCD are preferred over the experimental Plasma displays.

    I've seen the phospherous gases in a Plasma lose its chromatic-cohesion (the saturation was lost completely) over the span of three years.   Cost is also a major strike against Plasma.

    DLP seems to be the poor-man's HDTV but, there's all sorts of complaints I've heard regarding the "rainbow effect" from owners.  I have no complaints with my Sony Wega (1080p) but, what I perceive as perfection, others may find flawed.

    As for LCD displays, I've heard myriad complaints ranging from the heat output of the displays to deplorable refresh rates and "ghosting" effects.

    Ultimately, it will be up to you to decide what flaws you can live with: Is cost a factor? How high are your visual quality standards?  Do you want to hang this display on a wall or can a 6" deep display suffice? 

    Good luck with your purchase and would you please update us on what you've found?

  • User profile image
    Chris Fisk

    I'm not sure how viable an anonymous person's opinion would be regarding a purchasing decision but, in my experience, DLP and LCD are preferred over the experimental Plasma displays.

    I've seen the phospherous gases in a Plasma lose its chromatic-cohesion (the saturation was lost completely) over the span of three years.   Cost is also a major strike against Plasma.

    DLP seems to be the poor-man's HDTV but, there's all sorts of complaints I've heard regarding the "rainbow effect" from owners.  I have no complaints with my Sony Wega (1080p) but, what I perceive as perfection, others may find flawed.

    As for LCD displays, I've heard myriad complaints ranging from the heat output of the displays to deplorable refresh rates and "ghosting" effects.

    Ultimately, it will be up to you to decide what flaws you can live with: Is cost a factor? How high are your visual quality standards?  Do you want to hang this display on a wall or can a 6" deep display suffice? 

    Good luck with your purchase and would you please update us on what you've found?

  • User profile image
    Erik Porter

    I bought a 42" plasma almost 5 years ago and I haven't had any burn in yet.

  • User profile image
    Human​Compiler
    I bought a 42" plasma almost 5 years ago and I haven't had any burn in yet.
  • User profile image
    Joshua Mark Garrett

    Picture quality is most important to me, more so than price or size even. I do a lot of research before I buy any new gear and I was very leery of buying a flat panel TV because I knew the picture quality of my HD Sony CRT would be superior to any flat panel on the market, but my Sony CRT only had a 34" screen and weighed about 300 pounds. The size of the screen was a problem especially with gaming, and the sheer size of the beast made making wiring changes in my home theater a major hassle.

     I looked around for a good bit and decided to go with Plasma. Several of the DLP's I looked at, though displaying great color just looked a little soft. The rainbow effect and the possibility of changing lamps in future was enough to keep me away. LCD does have slightly higher resolution than Plasma but the black levels in LCD models just don’t cut it. They are getting better but they just can’t match the deep rich blacks and color that Plasma has. 

    Ask any TV tech and they will tell you that black levels matter more than resolution in determining picture quality. The screen size, sitting distance from the TV, and the quality of the source you’re watching makes a huge difference in how much resolution you really need.  Also in many LCD models you get motion effects on the screen when viewing fast action because the response time of screen.

    If you want to buy a TV now, and picture quality is paramount, I would go with Plasma. Panasonic are leaders in Plasma and have some very affordable models. If you want to wait another couple years, Canon and Toshiba I think are working on a new technology that combines the supreme picture quality of CRT with the thinness of Plasma or LCD. There will always be something better around the corner; all I know is that I’m enjoying movies and games right now on a 42” HD screen and I’m glad I didn’t keep my 300 pound CRT and wait ten years for the next big thing.

  • User profile image
    Joshua Mark Garrett

    Picture quality is most important to me, more so than price or size even. I do a lot of research before I buy any new gear and I was very leery of buying a flat panel TV because I knew the picture quality of my HD Sony CRT would be superior to any flat panel on the market, but my Sony CRT only had a 34" screen and weighed about 300 pounds. The size of the screen was a problem especially with gaming, and the sheer size of the beast made making wiring changes in my home theater a major hassle.

     I looked around for a good bit and decided to go with Plasma. Several of the DLP's I looked at, though displaying great color just looked a little soft. The rainbow effect and the possibility of changing lamps in future was enough to keep me away. LCD does have slightly higher resolution than Plasma but the black levels in LCD models just don’t cut it. They are getting better but they just can’t match the deep rich blacks and color that Plasma has. 

    Ask any TV tech and they will tell you that black levels matter more than resolution in determining picture quality. The screen size, sitting distance from the TV, and the quality of the source you’re watching makes a huge difference in how much resolution you really need.  Also in many LCD models you get motion effects on the screen when viewing fast action because the response time of screen.

    If you want to buy a TV now, and picture quality is paramount, I would go with Plasma. Panasonic are leaders in Plasma and have some very affordable models. If you want to wait another couple years, Canon and Toshiba I think are working on a new technology that combines the supreme picture quality of CRT with the thinness of Plasma or LCD. There will always be something better around the corner; all I know is that I’m enjoying movies and games right now on a 42” HD screen and I’m glad I didn’t keep my 300 pound CRT and wait ten years for the next big thing.

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