Wetware: placing electrodes on the brain to treat children's epilepsy

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Description

We here at 10 are all huge Matrix fans, and so any technology that offers a computer interface into our brains. While they haven't developed a way to instantaneously teach us kung-fu, Dr. Jeff Ojemann and his team at the Seattle Children's Hospital are making progress in the treatment of epilepsy.

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The Discussion

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    chris112

    Creepy!

  • User profile image
    chris112

    Creepy!

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    Rick

    Hopefully this will help solve some of the bigger issues as well.  Like placing electrodes in children's brains to stamp out the love of Pokemon.

  • User profile image
    Rick

    Hopefully this will help solve some of the bigger issues as well.  Like placing electrodes in children's brains to stamp out the love of Pokemon.

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    Walter Crespo

    Good work Tina, I agree with the Doctor, the brain is fascination.  I once saw a movie with Cliff Robertson called "Charly", ever since any story about the brain grabs my attention.  Can't wait for your next show , pretty lady.

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    Walter Crespo

    Good work Tina, I agree with the Doctor, the brain is fascination.  I once saw a movie with Cliff Robertson called "Charly", ever since any story about the brain grabs my attention.  Can't wait for your next show , pretty lady.

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    Matthew Mushall

    Great medical segment, Tina.  You and Laura have been at the top of your game lately.  I'd also like to add that its nice to see you wearing your hair up for a change on a more regular basis.  I really like it.  Anyway, I've always been interested in brain research.  You think we would know more about the largest muscle in our bodies, but that's just not the case.  The brain works so differently, that it is an entirely different line of study.

    My youngest cousin suffered from chilhood epilepsy, but eventually outgrew it. During that time, he was frequently undergoing study and taking medication, so I'm familiar with alot of the work that goes into epilepsy research.  It's difficult for both the doctors and patients.

    Speaking of medical reseach...when are we ever going to see the follow-up to your Genelex DNA lab segment?  I really want to know what European ancestry you're descended from and talk about more Tina clones.

  • User profile image
    Matthew Mushall

    Great medical segment, Tina.  You and Laura have been at the top of your game lately.  I'd also like to add that its nice to see you wearing your hair up for a change on a more regular basis.  I really like it.  Anyway, I've always been interested in brain research.  You think we would know more about the largest muscle in our bodies, but that's just not the case.  The brain works so differently, that it is an entirely different line of study.

    My youngest cousin suffered from chilhood epilepsy, but eventually outgrew it. During that time, he was frequently undergoing study and taking medication, so I'm familiar with alot of the work that goes into epilepsy research.  It's difficult for both the doctors and patients.

    Speaking of medical reseach...when are we ever going to see the follow-up to your Genelex DNA lab segment?  I really want to know what European ancestry you're descended from and talk about more Tina clones.

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    Maxwell2

    Interesting.... but maybe next time include a warning about sensitive material. I was eating while watching this!

    Thanks. Smiley

  • User profile image
    Maxwell2

    Interesting.... but maybe next time include a warning about sensitive material. I was eating while watching this!

    Thanks. Smiley

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