Platform Hygiene

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  • User profile image
    jeff shuey

    Great post Tim. Every platform provider has the right to change things up. However, they should keep their history and track record in mind when throwing stones. I like Vic (I used to work with him at Microsoft in the DPE org) and I understand where Google is coming from, but I also find myself taking a more skeptical view of what he and Google is saying vs. what they are doing.

  • User profile image
    fanbaby

    RE Google gears, funny how our views on this differ so much. I consider Google's decision to drop gears as one of the wisest decision of a tech company in recent years. Had Microsoft done the same in circa 2000, when SVG became a w3c standard, and dropped VML, the web would have been better off. Same for its nonstandard event model.

    Gears was a Google project, predating widespread HTML5 conformant browsers. It was a project design to push the web forward. And the web did go forward as we all know. Once HTML5 included most of what gears was, what was the point to continue with it? To create more misery for developers and the web?

    Microsoft stood before decisions like that many times. And it always chose wrong. Microsoft and its so-called web-developers never dugg the web. That's why they created IE6-only monstrosities claiming to be web-sites.

     

  • User profile image
    Stilgar

    XNA for Windows 8 or you are hypocrites!

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    @fanbaby: I think you missed the point. Tim clearly says later on that every platform provider is guilty of pulling APIs and services for numerous reasons, including reasons most would consider valid. It doesn't matter why Google pulled Gears, the fact is, they did, so they have a bad track record here. More importantly, Vic's post is just a veiled swipe at a competitor, one that's actually in kind of poor taste. I'm not at all sure I believe that the reason a write API hasn't been released is because they want to "get it right" first, but if that were the reason they should have conveyed this information without the attack. After all, there really isn't any real comparison between the Google+ write API being ready or not and Facebook's predatory actions w/ regard to Dalton Caldwell. This was nothing but an opportunistic mud slinging campaign.

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    To be clear, though, I feel this post is a little bit of mud slinging as well. At least Tim isn't promoting (directly) some Microsoft product here, like Vic did, but I still felt a bit slimy reading this.

  • User profile image
    akipekka

     It's so plain and simple. Developers need the API's. Consumers need the solutions built on the API's. If you can't provide the API's, maybe you shouldn't be developing software or cloud services at all. Period.

  • User profile image
    Nerdastic

    An opportunistic post on another opportunistic post. huh?

  • User profile image
    Alex​Sorokoletov

    Am I only one who thinks MS behavior is pretty much same as other

  • User profile image
    Fernando

    Classic VB, Silverlight, XNA, LINQ to SQL, Windows Phone 7, just to name a few where all promoted as the future, and that developers should commit to these technologies because it where Microsoft was going... Then Microsoft changed their mind and left us in the dark. So I see no difference between what you're saying about Google and what MS has done recently.

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    Am I only one who thinks MS behavior is pretty much same as other

    Obviously not. At least two other people made that observation before you in this thread. Wink

    It's not precisely the same, but it's close enough to be creepy.

  • User profile image
    EES

    I think you may be missing the point of Vic's message. I think he may be talking specifically about Google+. He may actually want to try to change the way Google has handled things in the past.

    I can see not wanting to release an extensive API for a product that really hasn't decided what it want to be yet.

  • User profile image
    ahad porkar

    nice article man

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    @EES: You're missing the point of Tim's post. Even if you believe Vic's reasoning for not having a write API yet, it has zero relationship to what Dalton was taking Facebook to task for, and thus Vic's post was nothing but opportunistic bashing of a competitor.

  • User profile image
    Jasmine

    Google take a humble tone? I think you ask too much :)

  • User profile image
    Anonymous Coward

    Like, for instance, docs not yet knowing where it's heading, right? Many developers wait for a decent API to drawings and text documents since ever.

  • User profile image
    Anton

    Nivd article
    Google's Vic posted a simple rant against facebook
    Both Facebook and google are equally bad and anticompetitive
    Google shut down products ov almost every startup it bought
    They do not have API for google ux because they want to own impressions of content to advertise on top of it

  • User profile image
    EShy

    Sure, Google's track record is really bad here.
    The real problem though is that at some point, they'll probably make changes to the G+ API as well. Companies don't do that out of hate for developers. you do that to clean things up and move forward.
    After writing a post like this, you look much worse when you do that

  • User profile image
    MaryUK

    To be fair, I think Google honestly thought that it could convince Microsoft to ship Gears as a default plugin with IE, to get the adoption level of Flash; it only got the HTML5 religion the way it did when it realised that wasn't going to happen (there is a superb exchange between the Gears team & a member of the IE team at a Google IO session on Gears on how privacy fails in Gears would prevent this, that might still be on YouTube). I'm sure that like Microsoft and APIs it's deprecated, Google thought that many of these products would be successes that made it worth keeping the APIs around for ever, but Google doesn't give much notice when it kills things. And pointing out that Google jumping on the Facebook bashing bandwagon is sleazy doesn't feel nearly as sleazy as Google doing it in the first place.

  • User profile image
    Jaime Bula

    Classic VB, Silverlight, XNA, LINQ to SQL, Windows Phone 7, just to name a few where all promoted as the future, and that developers should commit to these technologies because it where Microsoft was going... Then Microsoft changed their mind and left us in the dark. So I see no difference between what you're saying about Google and what MS has done recently.

     

    I simply couldn't agree more. Silverlight was the last pounding I took from microsoft.

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