The New Default Platform

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Description

The success of cloud computing, the emergence of IoT, and the growing popularity of machine learning all lead to an inescapable conclusion: We’re seeing the rise of a new default platform for IT. In this last keynote of the morning, David Chappell will describe this platform, showing how it encompasses IoT and machine learning and more. He’ll also give you a perspective on what you need to do to thrive in this new era.

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0

Level:

L100

Track:

Keynote

Session Type:

Keynote

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5

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The Discussion

  • User profile image
    Wardy

    I work in building financial hubs to connect some very large organisations together.

    The problem as David says is "trust" ... he's right ... except he's wrong ... the problem is not trusting Microsoft, the problem is trusting the governments in the places Microsoft does business.

    I presented this exact same problem to my boss about moving our platform to Microsofts cloud instead of trying to setup our own and his response was something like this ...

    Consider the scenario where some CEO got on the wrong side of a member of the government who happen to know someone from internal affairs and decided to puti n a few choice words in a letter to said internal affairs contact.

    A typical CFO / CEO of a large organisation is paid millions per year in salary.

    It's been pretty well seen in the news that the american government for example feels like it has the right to strong arm Microsoft to get access to whatever data that they see fit when they have a supposed "reason" justified or not and in some cases Microsoft has openly pushed back but usually in cases where peoples privacy rights might be breached or the data in question was not in a US based data center.

    So said letter gets sent ...

    Before you know it, you have some government "investigator" on say $60k a year claiming he knows best and demanding to see the financial records of that organisation in the interest of upholding something as simple as some daft tax law.

    The mere existence of the investigation alone, weather it goes nowhere or not will have a cost of potential billions to that organisations bottom line due to reputation hit and the disruption caused to the organisations business processes.

    Add to that, Microsoft isn't going to have its bottom take a major hit to defend an outfit that in the eyes of the government they answer to is breaking the law (weather that's the case or not).

    At the moment, such organisations host their data in jurisdictions where such a scenario is impossible / at least less risky and it gives those organisations some peace of mind knowing that their data is hosted where it can't be just demanded when some government official wants it for X reason.

    As always ...

    There's 2 sides to this coin, but when you get that high up financially you have to weigh risk, in ways that look overly defensive, but lets face it ... put yourself in the position of the government official that I previously mentioned.

    Could you really just do nothing?

    What if there was a bribe offered? They say most everyone has a limit, these kind of sums of money could be hard to say no to for many.

    Either way, if you were an honest official or not, the net result is the same ... loss of billions, thousands of people out of work ... serious economic effects on potential entire countries GDP's.

     

    The net result, some organisations just won't put their data any where near where this situation could happen. 

    That said ... its not that hard to setup your own data center if you're that big so wheres the case for using Azure?

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