Security Experts Panel Discussion: Security for Hackers (BYOD)

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Description

In this session, hear from industry experts on how they protect their environments from hackers. This panel offers a great chance to learn and gain insight into the minds of experts, and their ideal protection techniques. The panel discusses the technical details of recent security events, including Chinese attacks and other incidents in the world’s cyber war. Panelists browse through the security solutions that can be useful for infrastructure hardening, as well as techniques for malware recognition. Experts also share their experiences from ‘the battle field’, including the most successful and probable attacks in a customer’s infrastructure and the mitigation plan. Come hear an interesting discussion about what's hot in security!

Day:

2

Session Type:

Breakout

Code:

ATC-B312

Room:

La Nouvelle Ballroom C

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The Discussion

  • User profile image
    StevLaw

    Everyone wants their own device now. What about the Apple folks?

  • User profile image
    Belky

    Seems like a can't miss for IT security folks

  • User profile image
    Daniel​Stinson

    Definitely interested in this session

  • User profile image
    dmwiz

    Security is always a hot topic.

  • User profile image
    mwsmith

    I've attended a few of these type of sessions in the past and have always come away with something I didn't know before.

  • User profile image
    stevecorreia

    Listen at about 23:30 to the MS rep (Mark Simos) say that Malware "may not matter" and that you can never get to 100% clean.  Leave malware on low priority systems?  Are you insane?

    I have lost all respect for Microsoft security and Mark Simos especially.  I thought that Marcus was going to rip Mark's head off but he kept his response very professional.

  • User profile image
    Aaron​Margosis

    @stevecorreia: You misunderstood Mark's point.  He's not saying you should deliberately leave malware on systems.  If your anti-malware recognizes malicious software and can remove it, then it should.  Mark's point is about prioritizing efforts and recognizing which systems are more important than others.  Trying to achieve a continuous 100% perfectly malware-free environment on the systems of thousands or hundreds of thousands of internet-connected end users who browse random web sites and read personal email on relatively low-value systems that do not have access to the organization's most critical data is not practical today given the nature of malware and anti-malware and the higher costs needed to protect higher value systems (e.g., via isolation) may not be worth the effort for those lower value systems.  It doesn't make sense to treat all systems in your organization as being of equivalent value.  Mark also clarifies that organizations need to segment and isolate where the "crown jewels" are held.  Otherwise, as Marcus implies, knocking over any box in the environment makes it too easy to own the entire organization.

  • User profile image
    Sergey

    Is the link still available that was on those cards they've shown?
    Does anyone have that link? Please share...
    Thanks.

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