Coffeehouse Thread

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A Wierd Problem (I think)

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  • User profile image
    Angus

    OK, this has happened a few times now since I got my PC, I would like to see if anyone else gets this problem, and why?

    Sometimes when I am impatient and the computer is not shutting down I turn it off without shutting down, I am sure it is not a good move, but sometimes unavoidable. Then when I restart I usually get this light blue screen after the boot screen that says some things about the systems data and how their may be an error, or something to that effect. Then you have 10 seconds to press any key to skip this checking thing, if you do skip the checking thing the light blue screen always appears on startup. Now it seems that the check "truncates" entries in files on the computer, I would like to know what this means also, as I have no clue. On my PC the check sometimes never finishes, forcing me to turn the PC off without shutdown, this may be because I am too impatient to wait for long enough for the scan to complete.

    Any explanations would be greatly appreciated as I am really annoyed at this persistant and stupid problem.

    Thanks in advance

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    When you turn off your computer without shutting down, any running program that is in the middle of writing to disk is rudely cut off.

    This leaves the disk in a corrupt state.

    When you turn your computer on again, the operating system detects that the disk is in a corrupt state and asks if you want to let it (the OS) try to fix it (the disk.)

    Unless you say "no, don't," it will try its best to make what sense it can out of the half-written data.

  • User profile image
    Angus

    Thanks, that makes perfect sense, I suppose that is why the most common startup programs are usually corrupted as if I do switch off without a shutdown it is usually just after startup.

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Fortunatly this doesn't apply to NTFS hard-drives. So I'm guessing you're still using Windows 9x?

  • User profile image
    yanchaowang

    you had better not skip the disk checking
    otherwise you maybe at the risk of losing your data on that hard disk

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    W3bbo wrote:
    Fortunatly this doesn't apply to NTFS hard-drives. So I'm guessing you're still using Windows 9x?

    The 10 second delay thing he describes is definitely an NT thing, and the fact that it is light blue and not black means XP not 2000.

    Apparently, he is using XP but with a FAT drive. Not a good idea, but unfortunately still possible.

  • User profile image
    TimP

    You can convert your FAT32 drive to NTFS with the command "convert C: /fs:ntfs". You won't have to reformat and you won't lose any data.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    Sven Groot wrote:
    Apparently, he is using XP but with a FAT drive. Not a good idea, but unfortunately still possible.


    Nice if you need to dual-boot though.

  • User profile image
    Angus

    W3bbo wrote:
    Fortunatly this doesn't apply to NTFS hard-drives. So I'm guessing you're still using Windows 9x?


    I run XP, but my hard drive is FAT32

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    TimP wrote:
    You can convert your FAT32 drive to NTFS with the command "convert C: /fs:ntfs". You won't have to reformat and you won't lose any data.


    Great tip, Tim; I would go this route, myself.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    Back up all your data that you care about first, of course.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    JohnAskew wrote:
    TimP wrote: You can convert your FAT32 drive to NTFS with the command "convert C: /fs:ntfs". You won't have to reformat and you won't lose any data.


    Great tip, Tim; I would go this route, myself.

    Do note that a converted drive can be significantly less efficient than one that was formatted as NTFS. You typically end up with a bigger and fragmented MFT. At the very least defrag the drive after conversion, preferably with some tool that can defrag the MFT as well.

  • User profile image
    l33tn00b

    Ok I have experienced a very strange problem with IE after hibernation- any instance that was running when I put the computer into hibernation would fail to accept several keys- that is, if I were to go to google.com and trie to type in "microsoft," it would come out something like this:"microf" or something similar. The letters won't work unless I start a new instance. Any idea why?

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