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Why China need to import software from USA?(such as Office)

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  • User profile image
    leighsword

    According to David Ricardo's Export Condition(a1 * W1 *e < a2 * W2), another manner is a1/a2 = W2/(W1 * e).
    a Chinese developer's wage is less than an American developer much, and exchange rate is 1 USD:8 RMB,it is obvious that USA should import software from China, but in fact , we are still import software from USA.

    because of the quality of goods i think, so more productive .net is useless, cusutomers need more quality software that writen by C++ or ASM, just like Office and Windows.


    note:
    a1 = the labor requirement/unit in country1(a2 = country2)
    W1 = the wage rate in country1.
    e  = the exchange rate between two countries.

    David Ricardo(genius) was born in London on April 18, 1772, the son of wealthy Jewish immigrants. He received private instruction as a child and was exceedingly bright. At age 14 he started work in his father's stockbroker's office, but this association with his family ended seven years later when he became a Unitarian and married a Quaker.Ricardo then began his own immensely succssful career in securities and real estate. A most important factor in his financial success was his purchase of British goverment securities only four days before the Duke of Wellington defeated Napoleon at Waterloo in 1815. The subsequent boom in British securities alone made him a wealthy man.
    While on vacation in 1799, Ricardo read Adam Smith's The Wealth of Nations.(Don't we all read economics books while on vaction?)Fascinateed, he gradually made economics his avocation and wrote pamphlets and newspaper articles on the subject.Ricardo's opposition to the goverment's gold policies and to the Corn Laws(the restrictive laws on the importaion of grain into English) attracted widespread attention, and he soon broadened his inquiries to questions of profits and income distrbution.In 1817, Ricardo's landmark book, The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation, was published, bringing him fame even though he himself thought that few people would understand it. He became a member of Parliament in 1819.Anexcellent debater, despite a voice once described a 'harsh and squeaky', he was influential in educating the House of Commmons on economic questions, although the Corn Laws were no repealed until long after his death.
    Ricardo is usually credited with originating the concept of comparative advantage. In addition, Ricardo built an entire model of the economic system in which growth rests diminishing returns eventually leads to a stationary state with zero profits and affluent landlords.Ricardo was a paradox through his condemnation of the landlords class of which he himself was a member. After a remarkable career as a businessman, scholar , and politician, Ricardo died unexpectedly at age 51 on september 11, 1823.He was survived by his wife and seven children.



  • User profile image
    Stuart Celarier

    You need to identify and validate assumptions that go into "blackboard economics." This equation is assumes a model of a perfect free market economy, that there are no costs associated with entering a foreign marketplace, and that both states produce equivalent goods or services in ample quantity. I don't think any of those basic assumptions are true, so on each count the theory doesn't apply.

    Let's try to drag reality into the picture. You (generally) can't sell something you don't possess, and I haven't yet seen China produce commercial software that competes equally with, e.g., MS Office. So what do you consider to be the value of this economic theory in this situation?

  • User profile image
    Cairo

    leighsword wrote:
    exchange rate is 1 USD:8 RMB,it is obvious that USA should import software from China


    And China should let its exchange rate float.

  • User profile image
    JChung2006

    Oh look!  Leighsword with another ".NET sucks" post!  Ignore.

  • User profile image
    mrservices

    Is there any future for C programming? I thought I would start out with the C language because of it's portability and still being used.

    Roger

  • User profile image
    TimP

    mrservices wrote:
    Is there any future for C programming? I thought I would start out with the C language because of it's portability and still being used.

    Roger


    Operating systems, device drivers, performance critical applications (system emulators), very small embedded software, the list could go on. What's interesting (not saying it's good or bad) is how much user software is still pure C on UNIX/Linux.

  • User profile image
    scobleizer

    When you say "import" do you really mean "steal?" When I was in China no one I met bought software. They all used copies that were stolen.

    For every PC sold in China I believe only about $5 worth of software is sold (and that's the entire industry, not just Microsoft stuff).

    When I was in Shanghai you could buy nearly everything in the industry for about $1 (illegal copies).

    With an industry like that why would anyone invest in hiring China's best and brightest to make software?

  • User profile image
    mrservices

    TimP wrote:
    mrservices wrote: Is there any future for C programming? I thought I would start out with the C language because of it's portability and still being used.

    Roger


    Operating systems, device drivers, performance critical applications (system emulators), very small embedded software, the list could go on. What's interesting (not saying it's good or bad) is how much user software is still pure C on UNIX/Linux.


    TimP, thank you for the insight. Smiley
    I'm a point of sale reseller and work with business applications. Starting out on Unix (OpenBSD).
    I think a lot of games are still programmed in C E.g. Doom
    For any aspiring game progammers. Big Smile

    Best regards,

    Roger

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    Doom is already more than 10 years old (and it contained assembler code as well).

  • User profile image
    Manip

    Mono infringes on too many patents for businesses to ever take it seriously. It is almost an illegal implementation of a platform, what company is going to invest even moderate amounts on an illegal platform? I'll give you a clue its less than 1 more than -1. [6]


  • User profile image
    Manip

    Novel are heading towards bankruptcy, they have to take risks... Novel's own platform is almost dead, they have no obvious income except the few companies that can't change platforms because it would be too expensive. They haven't released much in the way of a new product in years (pre-OpenSource risks). 

    Novel used to mean something, now they are just has-beens that are doing whatever it takes to stop from closing down.  

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    mrservices wrote:
    Is there any future for C programming? I thought I would start out with the C language because of it's portability and still being used.

    Roger


    I'm more concerned with the number of programs still running COBOL.

    ...although there is a route out of there. I hear you can convert COBOL to COBOL.NET easily, and from there you can disassemble it into whatever .NET language you like.

    scobleizer wrote:
    When you say "import" do you really mean "steal?" When I was in China no one I met bought software. They all used copies that were stolen


    I'm usually careful about my choice of words in this grey area. "Steal" isn't the best word to describe "warez" thesedays. "Unauthorised Distribution", yes; "Copyright infringment", yes; But no, not stealing.

    Its only theft if someone is activly losing something, I don't believe you can contrast a loss of a sale with something being stolen.

    Such as this argument here.

  • User profile image
    mrservices

    Manip wrote:
    Novel are heading towards bankruptcy, they have to take risks... Novel's own platform is almost dead, they have no obvious income except the few companies that can't change platforms because it would be too expensive. They haven't released much in the way of a new product in years (pre-OpenSource risks). 

    Novel used to mean something, now they are just has-beens that are doing whatever it takes to stop from closing down.  


    I remember when being a CNE was a big deal 10 years ago.

    I wonder what it will be like 10 years from now in the software arena? Smiley

    Best regards,

    Roger

    John 3:16

  • User profile image
    TimP

    W3bbo wrote:
    I'm more concerned with the number of programs still running COBOL.

    ...although there is a route out of there. I hear you can convert COBOL to COBOL.NET easily, and from there you can disassemble it into whatever .NET language you like.


    I'm not sure I'd be "concerned" about COBOL code any more than I'd be concerned about C or .NET code. You can write solid code in any language, including COBOL or C# and you can write bad code. I would venture to say a lot of people running lots of COBOL code are still on IBM mainframes. I heard somewhere that COBOL is actually the most widely used language if you consider the amount of code in use at the moment. I don't remember the numbers, but it was many billions of lines of code. From a business standpoint, would you use the stable, reliable COBOL code that has been working well or would you invest a large sum of money in a new platform that may or may not fit the bill?

    The mainframe has three major platforms in itself, the native operating system (VSE, OS/390, z/OS), UNIX System Services (USS), and Linux either in a logical partition or virtual machine. Microsoft isn't involved in any of those which means the only .NET option would be Mono. I don't think any company running a mainframe would even consider a non-official, work in progress .NET implementation. Mainframes are evolving but the trend seems to be more towards rewriting it in Java than COBOL .NET.

    By the way, I saw this in a comment on Slashdot yesterday that made be laugh. Anyone familiar with the Saturday Night Live skit will no doubt recognize it:
    Guess what? I got a fever! And the only prescription... is more Cobol!

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    W3bbo wrote:

    scobleizer wrote: When you say "import" do you really mean "steal?" When I was in China no one I met bought software. They all used copies that were stolen


    I'm usually careful about my choice of words in this grey area. "Steal" isn't the best word to describe "warez" thesedays. "Unauthorised Distribution", yes; "Copyright infringment", yes; But no, not stealing.

    Its only theft if someone is activly losing something, I don't believe you can contrast a loss of a sale with something being stolen.

    Such as this argument here.



    ?

    dude it's stealing -- you can play with the words all year long but it's still theft.

    if I create a work -- book,movie,program etc...
    I have a legal right to be compensated for the use/copy of that work.
    if I claim my "copy right" to that work and someone bypasses my rights then the person who does that is a criminal and any user of any copy obtained thus is also comiting a crime.

    the fact that the stolen item is not say a car or other goods does not change that fact.

    mind you I do think that some things have been way overhyped like the whole music thing....

    but it is property and it does have an owner who may need to make a buck along the line or that owner may just not make any more of that kind of work -- after all if he cant pay his bills why do it?

  • User profile image
    Cairo

    scobleizer wrote:

    When you say "import" do you really mean "steal?"



    "China Standardizes on Software X"

    ... they bought one copy.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    Beer28 wrote:
    scobleizer wrote:

    When you say "import" do you really mean "steal?" When I was in China no one I met bought software. They all used copies that were stolen.

    For every PC sold in China I believe only about $5 worth of software is sold (and that's the entire industry, not just Microsoft stuff).

    When I was in Shanghai you could buy nearly everything in the industry for about $1 (illegal copies).

    With an industry like that why would anyone invest in hiring China's best and brightest to make software?



    Why did microsoft hire Dr. Kai Fu-Lee??

    Hey, what up.  It's me again.

    To answer your question:  Because he was good at what he does.  They also asked him to sign a non-compete.  Turns out that an NC means nothing to him.

    Beer28 wrote:

    The saddest thing about this is that if those people were selling CD's full of Redhat, Fedora, SuSE, or Turbo linux software, it would be perfectly legal as per the GPL license.


    Nope, the saddest thing is that the buyer and seller both think there is value in the software...

    Sorry, that was mean.

    Beer28 wrote:

    They could carry on with their business of reselling others' software in peace and continue making money.

    You realize, don't you, that you've pretty much mapped the open source ideals with the bread-line ideals of communism.

    Coder wants a cracker....

  • User profile image
    BruceLee

    scobleizer wrote:

    When you say "import" do you really mean "steal?" When I was in China no one I met bought software. They all used copies that were stolen.



    We steal softwares from USA, you steal oil from Iraq. Cool But if 10 years ago we have linux, open office and other high quality open-source softwares, things will be different today. [6][6][6]

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