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XML invention and ownership - The Mother of All Tech-Suits Launches

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  • User profile image
    a !

     

    The then-ten-year-old ISO standard to which Bray is referring is SGML.   According to Bray, XML "is just (SGML - 80%) + URIs for external references + Unicode." Given that Scientigo CEO Doyal Bryant specifically mentioned Amazon as a potential target for royalty extraction, Bray could be right about the  e-commerce angle.  To the extent that vendors like Oracle and Microsoft have platforms that may facilitate potentially infringing e-commerce applications, they could be targets too. :O

     

    http://www.scientigo.com/web-content/innovations_main.html


    http://blogs.zdnet.com/BTL/?p=2052

    http://news.com.com/Small+company+makes+big+claims+on+XML+patents/2100-1014_3-5905949.html?part=rss&tag=5905949&subj=news

    http://www.xml.com/pub/au/10

  • User profile image
    TomasDeml

    Article wrote:

    Bryant defends the company's plan, saying it's the "right move to make" for his company and shareholders.


    He must be crazy Perplexed

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    sbc

    That is why software patents should not exist, or at least the patent system reformed. They are a way of earning money without actually bringing a product to market.

    The problem you get are companies that go after companies when a technology becomes widespread. They may have spent time on researching something, but they should actually bring out a product, rather than let someone do the hard work then decide to charge royalties.

    Those that are granted a patent, should have a product on market soon after, or the patent gets revoked. If you did a lot of R&D at the very least there should be a prototype software product to demonstrate how it works. Just writing a specification for something doesn't seem good enough. It is the implementation that is hard.

    Innovation is often done by taking existing ideas and building on them. If a patent restricts that, then it cannot occur. Patents hurt the small companies far more than the big ones, who can often easily afford to license the technology.

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