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It's unofficial: Microsoft bets business on Linux

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  • User profile image
    FXEF

    It's unofficial: Microsoft bets business on Linux


    Any of you guys at the Microsoft campus care to comment?

  • User profile image
    Steve411

    Who cares? Microsoft does alot of stupid things and no one really minds.


    - Steve

  • User profile image
    geekling

    Uh, can someone tell my why the article title doesn't fit with what the article is saying?

    I don't read many Linux news sites, is this some kind of code word?

  • User profile image
    Cybermagell​an

    Remember BOB...this is something like it...Good idea crappy product

  • User profile image
    msemack

    So they bought some wireless access points that happen to run on Linux.  Many consumer-grade WAPs are Linux-based.  The wireless hardware is just an appliance.  Doing this is not the same as migrating their server infrastructure to Linux.

    Notice the sensational headline that was chosen for the article.  They're not "betting the business".  Irresponsible journalism strikes again.

  • User profile image
    Karim

    FXEF wrote:
    It's unofficial: Microsoft bets business on Linux
    Any of you guys at the Microsoft campus care to comment?



    So using a network "appliance" that runs Linux is the same as "betting the business" on Linux?

    Don't you get gyroscopic effects with that kind of spin?

    Those cheap, ubiquitous Netgear routers run Linux.   (Or at least it seems that way from the number of firmware upgrades they require.)

    Obviously Microsoft doesn't have any problem with Linux as long as it stays where it belongs, i.e. on toasters and other "appliances."  They probably wouldn't have a problem with using Linux-powered doorstops either.  Not sure if that's tantamount to "betting the business" on it.

    Coca-Cola news: Microsoft bets business on Coke

    Starbucks news: Microsoft bets business on Starbucks

    Gap news: Microsoft Geeks bet wardrobe on khakis

    <rolleyes>  Whatever.

  • User profile image
    Cybermagell​an

    Karim wrote:

    Coca-Cola news: Microsoft bets business on Coke

    Starbucks news: Microsoft bets business on Starbucks

    Gap news: Microsoft Geeks bet wardrobe on khakis

    <rolleyes>  Whatever.


    Life bets self on heart/brain/stomach/etc...

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Beer28 wrote:
    Karim wrote:
    Obviously Microsoft doesn't have any problem with Linux as long as it stays where it belongs, i.e. on toasters and other "appliances."  They probably wouldn't have a problem with using Linux-powered doorstops either.  Not sure if that's tantamount to "betting the business" on it.


    Microsoft obviously doesn't want to pay for WindowsCE licenses, resold to them as markup on hardware or the solution service, why should we?



    So you could point out wireless access points, supporting radius and smart card authenication, with rotating keys via WPA which is powered by CE then?

    I'll wait.

  • User profile image
    msemack

    Beer28 wrote:
    Microsoft obviously doesn't want to pay for WindowsCE licenses, resold to them as markup on hardware or service solution, why should we?


    I don't think it's got anything to do with that.  It's a question of "does this appliance do the job, and is it cost effective?".  Whether or not it runs Linux doesn't enter into the equation.

    It's no different than buying a dishwasher.  Do you ask yourself what kind of OS it runs in firmware?  Or do you just ask how good is it at washing dishes?

    Beer28 wrote:
    They would have been victim of their own software being resold to them as part of the price of the service. Microsoft was smart, they chose the linux solution and saved the cash by not paying for pricy windows licenses


    While lower-royalties are usually better from a cost standpoint, it's just one part of the equation.

    As a side note, I'd like point out that not all embedded Linux distributions are royalty-free.  Some include propietary features which incur per-unit royalties.  I have no idea what Linux distro these Wireless Access Points use, though.

    Back to the issue at hand:  Royalties are just one part of the cost of a device.  Many other factors can affect the cost.

    Consider this:  Suppose you have a choice between Windows CE and Linux.  A Linux system may have no royalities.  However, Windows CE may have faster development time (meaning lower engineering costs).

    Over the lifecycle of the device, the reduced engineering costs may execeed the total costs incurred by the royalties.  Therefore, using Windows CE may translate to lower prices for the customer.

    I'm not saying this is univesally true (WinCE being cheaper).  I'm just saying that royalties are only one factor in a pretty complex equation.

  • User profile image
    Karim

    Beer28 wrote:
    usually small devices don't even run a multithreaded environment like windows anyway though. Can you imagine the cost?


    You mean small devices like this?

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Beer28 wrote:
    usually small devices don't even run a multithreaded environment like windows anyway though. Can you imagine the cost?



    So you're admitting that your "Even Microsoft won't pay the licensing cost for CE access points" comment was incredibily stupid?

  • User profile image
    Karim

    blowdart wrote:
    So you could point out wireless access points, supporting radius and smart card authenication, with rotating keys via WPA which is powered by CE then?

    I'll wait.

  • User profile image
    Cybermagell​an

    Beer28 wrote:

    I can't wait for mono to totally penetrate the market so that unix people and "managed" code people, that were made by microsoft can get together and collaborate on projects on linux.


    What's mono?

  • User profile image
    Cairo

    Karim wrote:
    Beer28 wrote:usually small devices don't even run a multithreaded environment like windows anyway though. Can you imagine the cost?


    You mean small devices like this?



    When traditional digital watches aren't geeky enough...

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    So I guess that's why the new Linksys routers dropped Linux and running VxWorks, eh?

    (The offered explanation is to avoid legal problems with licensing. The irony! Smiley )

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