Coffeehouse Thread

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Moving to Linux for a While

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  • User profile image
    PeterH

    Hey Channel 9,

    For the next few months I'm going to be using a Linux (Fedora Core 4 to be precise). I have very little experience with Linux and I just want to know what I'm missing.

    Anyway, I was hoping some of you may know of some Linux alternitives to some of the Windows applications that I use regularly.

    - Dreamweaver
    - 3D Max
    - Matlab
    - Outlook

    I think I know of alternatives for all the rest of the applications I use. I was also hoping that you could tell me the most popular C++ compilers/IDE's for Linux?

    I know that I could have posted this in a Linux forum, but as a Windows user moving to Linux I thought this forum would be perfectly appropriate.

    Thanks,

    - PeterH

    p.s. Anything else that you think I should know I would love to hear.

  • User profile image
    Detroit Muscle

    Matlab is available for Linux.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    PeterH wrote:

    - Dreamweaver
    - 3D Max
    - Matlab
    - Outlook


    Thunderbird is a slightly ok alternative to Outlook... And I think you can get Maya for UNIX...

    PeterH wrote:
    I was also hoping that you could tell me the most popular C++ compilers/IDE's for Linux?


    gcc / the IDEs suck.

    PeterH wrote:
    p.s. Anything else that you think I should know I would love to hear.


    Move to Mac OS X instead.

  • User profile image
    Detroit Muscle

    Intel's C/C++ compiler (icc) is available for free on Linux for non-commercial use. It's the best x86 compiler available.

  • User profile image
    Erisan

    Manip wrote:
    PeterH wrote:
    - Dreamweaver
    - 3D Max
    - Matlab
    - Outlook


    Thunderbird is a slightly ok alternative to Outlook... And I think you can get Maya for UNIX...


    Outlook Express vs Thunderbird: an e-mail client comparison
    Outlook vs Evolution vs Kontact: an e-mail client comparison

  • User profile image
    Manip

    Detroit Muscle wrote:
    Intel's C/C++ compiler (icc) is available for free on Linux for non-commercial use. It's the best x86 compiler available.


    You mean the compiler that creates executables that run slower *BY DESIGN* on AMD machines? ... Yeah sure, best compiler on x86... 8-)

  • User profile image
    PeterH

    Detroit Muscle wrote:


    Matlab is available for Linux.



    Oh, thanks, I didn't know that.

    Manip wrote:
    PeterH wrote:
    - Dreamweaver
    - 3D Max
    - Matlab
    - Outlook


    Thunderbird is a slightly ok alternative to Outlook... And I think you can get Maya for UNIX...

    PeterH wrote: I was also hoping that you could tell me the most popular C++ compilers/IDE's for Linux?


    gcc / the IDEs suck.

    PeterH wrote: p.s. Anything else that you think I should know I would love to hear.


    Move to Mac OS X instead.


    Thanks, I'll try Thunderbird and Maya is great I forgot about that. 

    gcc is fine with me, no need for IDE.

    Haha, I've used Mac OS X before, I really think that it would have to change alot for me to even think of trying it! I want to learn more about how computers actually work, I think that the terminal and the whole nature of Linux could help with that.

    It is nothing perminent, I just want to explore all the options. thanks for the replies.

  • User profile image
    Erisan

    PeterH wrote:

    ... and Maya is great I forgot about that.


    Blender is worth of try.

  • User profile image
    PeterH

    Detroit Muscle wrote:
    Intel's C/C++ compiler (icc) is available for free on Linux for non-commercial use. It's the best x86 compiler available.


    I'll give that a try also, despite the fact that it runs slower on AMD (by design). I'm on Intel, and anything I write is not for distribution Smiley

    Thanks for the link Erisan, I'll look at them.

  • User profile image
    PeterH

    Wow, I didn't realise how powerful Blender was, thanks for the link Erisan.

  • User profile image
    Erisan

    PeterH wrote:
    Wow, I didn't realise how powerful Blender was, thanks for the link Erisan.


    Actually it would be better just use 'yum' to install Blender (and other
    programs too if possible). 'yum install blender'. I'm not sure is it part
    of FC4 (I'm currently using FC5).

    Unfortunately FC4 doesn't have graphical backend to yum.
    FC4 has "old" GNOME 2.10 and Xorg 6.8.2 also... Expressionless
    Xorg 7.0 (modular!) will be out soon and which will be huge improvement
    to UNIX/UNIX-like desktops.

    But anyway. It's good at least try other systems too.

    I'm going to sleep.. *zZzZz*

  • User profile image
    ZippyV

    Is FC5 already in beta?

  • User profile image
    Cairo

    Dreamweaver:
    I don't know of a replacement. You could try running it in Wine/Cedega/Crossover. There's NVu, but I don't think it rises to the level of Dreamweaver.

    3D Max:
    Maya, Blender

    Matlab:
    Matlab, Mathematica

    Outlook:
    Outlook running in Crossover/Wine/Cedega
    Evolution
    Thunderbird (mail only)

    Compilers/IDEs:
    GCC. Intel's compiler.
    Eclipse with CDT.
    Anjuta.

    Other:
    Inkscape (vector art, SVG)



  • User profile image
    PeterH

    Thanks Beer! I really appreciate your help. I'm following your instruction right now.

  • User profile image
    PeterH

    Cairo wrote:
    Dreamweaver:
    I don't know of a replacement. You could try running it in Wine/Cedega/Crossover.


    Ah, I see, so do Wine/Cedega/Crossover emulate the windows environment for these applications to run in?

    I'll try out Inkscape, thanks.

  • User profile image
    Cairo

    Peter,

    Yes. Wine is a Win32 implementation for Linux. Crossover Office is the professionally supported version.

    Cedega is a different professionaly supported version of Wine that's focused on running games.





  • User profile image
    Angus

    I don't know much on this subject, but some of Open Office's features could be of use to you.

    Just an idea

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    To get the full Fedora Linux experience, Use it long enough to have to upgrade from one version to the next (ie: FC4 to FC5).

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