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Bill Gates named Person of the Year

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  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    Slashdot: http://slashdot.org/articles/05/12/18/1415241.shtml?tid=109
    Original Story: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10516674/
    My response: http://blog.damnednice.com

    It looks to me that the goodness of a person is being measured by how much money they throw at people.  The only difference between business and charity is that in this case, people need it.  The question I propose is, has Bill done any charity work?  Has he volunteered his time and labor?  Or at least that of some lackeys?

  • User profile image
    BryanF

    First of all, you are directed to the discussion already in progress here:

    http://channel9.msdn.com/ShowPost.aspx?PostID=147005

    Second, after reviewing your blog, it seems mighty haughty for some one like you to judge charitable motives in such a cynical way when most of your recent volunteer work is motivated by court order.

    [6]

  • User profile image
    manickernel

    Not to mention with such racial comments as:

    and with a bunch of Mexicans I wouldn’t be suprised.

    in your blog, nobody gives a rat's arse what you think.

    Such venom, such envy. No love from Mommie behind all this angst? Or just juvenile hormones kicking in?

    As contrasted from the Times article:

    They see the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation not as a solution but as a catalyst for this progress: pumping resources and rigor into the fight just when scientists are inventing new tools that could change everything. "This is a magic time in terms of the momentum we can get going," Bill says later from his hotel suite.

  • User profile image
    Andrei P

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    Has he volunteered his time and labor?


    Of course he did. His money were earned with his time and labor, from 1975 until today. He could aswell donate a couple million dollars like the other CEOs once every 5 years, instead of billions. And if you're ever going to have money, you will understand that even when you have billions, it's not easy giving them away. There's selfishness in all of us.

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    BryanF wrote:

    it seems mighty haughty for some one like you to judge charitable motives in such a cynical way when most of your recent volunteer work is motivated by court order.


    Ahh, touché.  I would like to point out that i never claimed to be a charitable person.  However, if I were rich enough to buy everything I could possibly need or want, I'd have no problem dispersing the remainder among others. Also, you have no way of knowing that I haven't performed tons of additional volunteer work and neglected to mention it.  Granted, I haven't; but that seems assumptious of you.

    manickernel wrote:

    Not to mention with such racial comments as[...]  Such venom, such envy. No love from Mommie behind all this angst? Or just juvenile hormones kicking in?


    A bit vague, I wasn't referring to all of our southern neighbors.  The ones in my local area are of the less favorable variety.  I know many of them to be decent, clean, hard-working citizens.   Just not the ones at that particular bar in that particular part of town.  Just as I know other folks of my ilk are responsible for such problems as football riots, overcommercialization,  and line dancing.

    I should have been more specific.  I don't disrespect or dislike any specific group (i.e., normal legally-protected statuses) any more than any other.  I just dislike and disrespect them for different reasons.  And my mother died when I was two, so I've grown up without that whole sensitive side to counterbalance my opinions.  I apoligize to anyone I may have offended.

    Moderators, you may lock this thread now.  I was expecting that particular type of flame to be left on my blog comments.  Thank you.

  • User profile image
    manickernel

    Why lock the thread? In fact you do service in providing a perfect example of those who are cynically critical and "talk the talk" while others such as Bill, Melinda, and Bono are actually "walking the walk".

  • User profile image
    Shiv

    Good that u realised that u affect others feelings . try to avoid these statements as well

    SlackmasterK wrote:

    A bit vague, I wasn't referring to all of our southern neighbors.  The ones in my local area are of the less favorable variety.


    and back to the topic of Bill spending time on charity please use google or any other search or any online news portals . Many people know that he announced doubling of employes in India but how many of you know that he also announced some aid in medical research and spent some time with his wife in cancer institute in here ( chennai) . i just read an article praising their simplicity and humbleness during the entire visit in a local language article

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    manickernel wrote:
    Why lock the thread? In fact you do service in providing a perfect example of those who are cynically critical and "talk the talk" while others such as Bill, Melinda, and Bono are actually "walking the walk".


    Answer the First: I was making a passive observation about the article, and hadn't intended it to be taken as a major flame... More specifically, I wasn't expected flames toward my blog to be taken to an entirely different forum.  Threads get locked when the flames get too hot, then arguments are taken into private communication.

    Answer the Second:

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    I would like to point out that i never claimed to be a charitable person.

  • User profile image
    jmacdonagh

    SlackmasterK, get over yourself. The guy donates exponentially more than any other person on the face of this earth and all you can whine about is how he doesn't donate his time either? Think about this: spend a day at a soup kitchen and do $40 of work. Spend a day at Microsoft and make $4,000.

    Regardless of whether you agree with Microsoft's busines practices, the generosity of Bill and Melinda gates should be commended.

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    I appreciate your directness.  Now, let me be equally direct: I'm not saying they're not generous and charitable.  My original comment was simply that it's strange that a person's goodness is reflected by how much they donate.  Allow me to paint an allusion:

    At a church collection, there are many people who give to the plate.  Let us focus on two of them.  The first, a wealthy businessman, cuts a generous check for thousands, millions, perhaps billions of dollars.   The second, but a pauper, still struggling to feed her own family, gives the last penny she has - which she was fortunate enough to find on the floor.  Who gave more?

  • User profile image
    Steve411

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    Slashdot: http://slashdot.org/articles/05/12/18/1415241.shtml?tid=109
    Original Story: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10516674/
    My response: http://blog.damnednice.com

    It looks to me that the goodness of a person is being measured by how much money they throw at people.  The only difference between business and charity is that in this case, people need it.  The question I propose is, has Bill done any charity work?  Has he volunteered his time and labor?  Or at least that of some lackeys?


    Have you?

  • User profile image
    jmacdonagh

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    I appreciate your directness.  Now, let me be equally direct: I'm not saying they're not generous and charitable.  My original comment was simply that it's strange that a person's goodness is reflected by how much they donate.  Allow me to paint an allusion:

    At a church collection, there are many people who give to the plate.  Let us focus on two of them.  The first, a wealthy businessman, cuts a generous check for thousands, millions, perhaps billions of dollars.   The second, but a pauper, still struggling to feed her own family, gives the last penny she has - which she was fortunate enough to find on the floor.  Who gave more?


    If the business man was constantly cutting checks every week at church, I would have to say him. Seriously, your metaphor was something you'd see in a Disney movie. I'm sure the church would be delighted to see a poor woman donate the last penny she had. But I'm sure they'd be delighted as well to see the business man cut a check.

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    Steve411 wrote:
    SlackmasterK wrote: The question I propose is, has Bill done any charity work?  Has he volunteered his time and labor?  Or at least that of some lackeys?


    Have you?


    In fact, I have.  While I was in the Air Force I volunteered a few times for Habitat for Humanity.  I also purchase Girl Scout cookies every year knowing lots of that money is used for charity. Every year I buy a year's worth ($100-150) because I know I won't get any of those delicious thin mints again until they're ready to sell next year. They stay fresh in the freezer for plenty long enough.

  • User profile image
    brian.​shapiro

    eh. Time should be more creative naming person of the year. I've thought a lot of their decisions have been very shallow. For example in 1992 it would have made more sense to name Perot instead of Clinton (yes, actually I am a Perot supporter--but lets be honest, Perot influenced the political debate at the time far more than Clinton). who should have been named this year?--i'd have to take that in consideration, but I don't think Bill Gates

  • User profile image
    pikatung

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    At a church collection, there are many people who give to the plate.  Let us focus on two of them.  The first, a wealthy businessman, cuts a generous check for thousands, millions, perhaps billions of dollars.   The second, but a pauper, still struggling to feed her own family, gives the last penny she has - which she was fortunate enough to find on the floor.  Who gave more?

    That is an extremly well known parable told by Jesus to his followers. He indeed stated the woman gave more.

    http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Luke%2021:1-4;&version=31;
    http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?book_id=48&chapter=12&verse=41&end_verse=43&version=31&context=context


    However, there is one small caveat, he can read people's minds and in turn their motives; we cannot. The woman, for all we know, may be the most decadent, devious person on the face of the earth, whereas the businessman the most moral and righteous. It is impossible for us to tell, and in turn, for us to judge.

  • User profile image
    Tonatiúh

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    [...] At a church collection, there are many people who give to the plate.  Let us focus on two of them.  The first, a wealthy businessman, cuts a generous check for thousands, millions, perhaps billions of dollars.   The second, but a pauper, still struggling to feed her own family, gives the last penny she has - which she was fortunate enough to find on the floor.  Who gave more?


    Who of those two? I can't say... But I can assert with utter certainty that those whom have stood judging who of the two gave more, have given nothing.

    Tonatiúh

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