Coffeehouse Thread

32 posts

I lost my direction on software

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  • leighsword

    When I tried Win95, I knew I should focus on the Multimedia service;
    When I tried Win98, I knew I should focus on the Internet service;
    When I tried Win2000, I knew I should focus on the Enterprise service;
    When I tried WinXP, I knew I should focus on the Game service. Unfortunately, I have seen the directions but I am not good at programming before.
    Now I want to get it a shot, but I found I have lost my direction. Even I tried Vista(Longhorn), I am still not sure where should I go, maybe I should focus on sell the hardware, or maybe I am not lost my direction, MS lost its direction.

  • SlackmasterK

    These days the big push seems to be integration between local machines and the Internet.  Software and the 'web are slowly melding together in such a way that the lines will soon become slightly blurry. 

    When losing sense of direction, always go forward.  Unless that leads to water or predators. 

  • leighsword

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    These days the big push seems to be integration between local machines and the Internet.  Software and the 'web are slowly melding together in such a way that the lines will soon become slightly blurry. 

    When losing sense of direction, always go forward.  Unless that leads to water or predators. 

    When losing sense of direction, I'd like to stop, and asked Others, because I don't know which direction is 'go forward', even 'map' cannot help me in this situation.

  • footballism

    Avalon and Indigo is the future, going for them my lady:p

    Sheva

  • Ian

    At its simplest level Vista is about convergence. 
    All the signs are there from MS (Mix06/360/Media Centre PCs etc) and the time is right.

  • Sven Groot

    When in doubt, always follow your nose. </gandalf>

  • Heywood_J

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    When losing sense of direction, always go forward.


    Unfortunately, you can be going in a circle, but think you are going forward.



  • MasterPi

    Vista = focus on seamless integration of everything you listed?

  • SlackmasterK

    Heywood_J wrote:
    Unfortunately, you can be going in a circle, but think you are going forward.


    Quite so.  Being in such a situation often causes people to revert to simply following others down the beaten path. 

  • Wil

    Follow the lead of the most recent release of Windows 2003 server, and focus on 64-bit distributed programming.  Clusters are where we all shall be soon (or so MS hopes, since they had much rather see a company buy a moving van-full of dual-CPU low-end servers than a single mainframe, for obvious reasons).  Actually, the vendors of low-end UNIX servers have the same dream too - blanket the world with Beowulf clusters and junk the 48-CPU servers that only the big boys sell.  So bone up on optimizing your code for parallelizing your apps.

  • Karim

    leighsword wrote:
    When I tried Win95, I knew I should focus on the Multimedia service;
    When I tried Win98, I knew I should focus on the Internet service;
    When I tried Win2000, I knew I should focus on the Enterprise service;
    When I tried WinXP, I knew I should focus on the Game service.


    When you try Vista, you should focus on the Web service Big Smile

  • ScanIAm

    Karim wrote:
    leighsword wrote: When I tried Win95, I knew I should focus on the Multimedia service;
    When I tried Win98, I knew I should focus on the Internet service;
    When I tried Win2000, I knew I should focus on the Enterprise service;
    When I tried WinXP, I knew I should focus on the Game service.


    When you try Vista, you should focus on the Web service


    Interesting that you say that.  Where are the useful web services?  Most of what I've seen have been rehashes of the same crud that was being scraped off of websites 10 years ago:  maps, weather, stocks, etc.

    Web Services seem to have a great potential to unify stuff, but to what end?  Write another Flickr?  Maybe we could write an application front end on top of eBay, Google, Amazon, or whatever, but why do that?  If you have a connection, just surf there directly.

    A number of people have come up with 'clever' map hacks that put interesting stuff online matched up with the various mapping servers, but honestly, how many of us continue to use them after the 'wow' factor. 

    Web services are mostly used (IMO) to drag legacy systems, kicking and screaming, into the 21st century.  Don't get me wrong, I like them, but they seem to be a solution looking for a problem.

  • rjdohnert

    Use Mac OS X, it inspires you to be creative.

    leighsword wrote:
    When I tried Win95, I knew I should focus on the Multimedia service;
    When I tried Win98, I knew I should focus on the Internet service;
    When I tried Win2000, I knew I should focus on the Enterprise service;
    When I tried WinXP, I knew I should focus on the Game service. Unfortunately, I have seen the directions but I am not good at programming before.
    Now I want to get it a shot, but I found I have lost my direction. Even I tried Vista(Longhorn), I am still not sure where should I go, maybe I should focus on sell the hardware, or maybe I am not lost my direction, MS lost its direction.

  • rjdohnert

    When I saw Win95, I knew I was glad I was using NeXTStep;
    When I saw Win98, I knew I was even happier I was using NeXT;
    When I tried Win2000, I was glad I was on Mac OS but definately said Win2000 was definately a step in the right direction;
    When I tried WinXP aka big brother edition MS now own my PC, I knew computer users everywhere where screwed.

    Now with WinVista while its a leap above everybody else, we are still screwed.  MS still owns our PC's and there is nothing we can do about it.

  • Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    rjdohnert wrote:
    When I saw Win95, I knew I was glad I was using NeXTStep;
    When I saw Win98, I knew I was even happier I was using NeXT;
    When I tried Win2000, I was glad I was on Mac OS but definately said Win2000 was definately a step in the right direction;
    When I tried WinXP aka big brother edition MS now own my PC, I knew computer users everywhere where screwed.

    Now with WinVista while its a leap above everybody else, we are still screwed.  MS still owns our PC's and there is nothing we can do about it.


    Vista you may be able to ake the argument about MS owning your PC, but XP?

    And you sure paid a premium for NeXTStep too.

  • Sven Groot

    ScanIAm wrote:
    Web services are mostly used (IMO) to drag legacy systems, kicking and screaming, into the 21st century.  Don't get me wrong, I like them, but they seem to be a solution looking for a problem.

    Web Services (and various related specifications such as WS-Resources) are extremely useful in Grid systems. One of the most used grid toolkits, Globus Toolkit 4 makes a lot of use of Web Services and Service Oriented Architecture based on the Open Grid Service Architecture (OGSA).

  • rjdohnert

    XP you have Activation, Windows Genuine Advantage and other spy-me's on there.  Windows 2000 and NeXT Step didnt have those mechanisms and while yes, I did pay a premium for my NeXT box, I didnt have to worry about my data and Microsoft using owning my PC.


    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    rjdohnert wrote: When I saw Win95, I knew I was glad I was using NeXTStep;
    When I saw Win98, I knew I was even happier I was using NeXT;
    When I tried Win2000, I was glad I was on Mac OS but definately said Win2000 was definately a step in the right direction;
    When I tried WinXP aka big brother edition MS now own my PC, I knew computer users everywhere where screwed.

    Now with WinVista while its a leap above everybody else, we are still screwed.  MS still owns our PC's and there is nothing we can do about it.


    Vista you may be able to ake the argument about MS owning your PC, but XP?

    And you sure paid a premium for NeXTStep too.

  • IRenderable

    rjdohnert wrote:
    XP you have Activation, Windows Genuine Advantage and other spy-me's on there



    You mean the "Make sure your not running a pirated version of Windows"? That's not spying. THey don't look at your private files or internet activity or anything.

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