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Windows Xp "N" Edition

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  • User profile image
    mastermine

    Are the Windows XP Home/Pro"N" Editions Sold in the us are they just for europe

  • User profile image
    Jason Cox

    I'm assuming they're only sold in EU member states because EU law doesnt extend beyond EU borders into the US, if you really want it though you can probally find it on Amazon.

  • User profile image
    mastermine

    I live in the UK so i can get it but i think its stupid it costs the same but i does not include windows media player whats the point if you do not like windows media playe then just dont use it

  • User profile image
    PaoloM

    mastermine wrote:
    I live in the UK so i can get it but i think its stupid it costs the same but i does not include windows media player whats the point if you do not like windows media playe then just dont use it

    Complain to your local EU representative.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    mastermine wrote:
    I live in the UK so i can get it but i think its stupid it costs the same but i does not include windows media player whats the point if you do not like windows media playe then just dont use it


    It takes up hard drive space... shortcuts take up screen space... it's a potential attack vector...

  • User profile image
    BryanF

    Oh, please: that's just rubbish. On my computer, Media Player takes up less than 10 MB--probably a few cents at most in terms of $/MB. Shortcuts can be removed with little trouble. In terms of security, WMP10 seems above average; Secunia lists only one advisory (this month, unfortunately) in the year and a half since it's release.

    XP N is an exercise in bureauacratic futility.

    EDIT: corrected years.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    BryanF wrote:
    WMP10 seems above average; Secunia lists only one advisory (this month, unfortunately) in the year and a half since it's release.


    If you include prior versions that number goes up to sixteen.

    EDIT: wait, that's double-counting some vulnerabilities.  My point though was that it was a potential attack vector.  That's true even if there's never been a published vulnerability.

  • User profile image
    BryanF

    While technically true that more code yields a greater attack surface, that logic is still flawed. The problem is that you make that argument about just about anything. Taken to an extreme, you could cut features from the operating system until you were left with hardly anything at all. Surface area reduction is important, but it needs to be done in the context of what customers actually need to do with the product on a day to day basis. A media player is a very reasonable thing to include in an operating system; most people would consider it a necessary component for client-side computing. Even business users may use it for things such as training videos. The risk-benefit makes including a media player worth while. If a manufacturer or customer installs an alternative media player (say Real) and associates all media content with it, then the WMP code is never called, except perhaps by third party apps that require that functionality to run anyways.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    BryanF wrote:
    most people would consider it a necessary component for client-side computing


    We could quibble about the most bit.  Especially in a corporate environment, I could easily see some companies not wanting their employees watching videos at work.

    But there's no real benefit in making it mandatory, is there?  How hard would a checkbox be? The only reason I can think of is for Microsoft to give themselves a competitive advantage over QuickTime and Real.

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    BryanF wrote:
    Taken to an extreme, you could cut features from the operating system until you were left with hardly anything at all.


    That's the general idea, yes.  Is it extreme?

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Maurits wrote:
    BryanF wrote:Taken to an extreme, you could cut features from the operating system until you were left with hardly anything at all.


    That's the general idea, yes.  Is it extreme?


    Ever heard of Slackware?

    Personally, I'd love a Windows distribution where I just get the kernel and I'm free to mix 'n' match my own windowing system, GUI, shell, and apps.

  • User profile image
    BryanF

    Yes, I think it is a bit extreme. Not outrageous, mind you, but more trouble than it's worth.

    The problem with what you're asking for is that it is a level of customization that only appeals to a relatively small population of anal control freaks. It isn't simply a matter of "adding a checkbox" -- creating a new version of a product requires adding complexity to the testing, manufacturing, packaging, and marketing of the product. As the web has been chattering about the numerous editions of Office 2007 and Vista that will ultimately be delivered, many people have grumbled for less complexity. The more editions there are of a product, the harder it is for customers, particularly non-technical ones, to reasonably choose among them; as a result there is a tendancy to choose the most full-featured one, rather than risk missing out on something they wanted. Many European OEMs haven't even bothered to offer XP N as a choice: all it does is add complexity to their stocking and sale processes with absolutely no customer value. If you're going to take the time to segment a product into various editions, then it should be done along "natural bounderies" that make sense to normal people: mobile, business workstation, media center, etc.

    It isn't even all that clear that bundling has such significant antitrust implications. People are more than capable than choosing an alternative product when they are unsatisfied with the default--look at Firefox, WinAmp, and iTunes. Moreover, most OEMs bundle third party applications as part of profitable distribution agreements. Probably the only people that don't have at least one alternative media player "out of the box" are the people who buy retail copies of Windows and manually ugrade or build their own systems. Generally speaking, people with enough initiative to go out and buy an operating system and install it on their computer are not the kind of people that will be flustered by having to download an executable from a website if they so choose. If business customers insist on removing WMP from client machines, it can already be done today via group policy.

    I don't think bundling is wrong. What is wrong is when products are bundled in such a way that actively hinder alternatives. What Microsoft did with exclusive contracts for IE in the '90s and what Apple is doing now with iTunes+iPod are examples of this kind of bundling.

  • User profile image
    dotnetjunkie

    The European Commission does stupid things all the time without asking what their citizens think....

    It's so outrageous that the MS and the US government should prosecute them! Smiley

     

  • User profile image
    Maurits

    W3bbo wrote:
    Maurits wrote:
    BryanF wrote: Taken to an extreme, you could cut features from the operating system until you were left with hardly anything at all.


    That's the general idea, yes.  Is it extreme?


    Ever heard of Slackware?



    Two Slackware servers in production Smiley

  • User profile image
    GurliGebis

    Maurits wrote:
    BryanF wrote: most people would consider it a necessary component for client-side computing


    We could quibble about the most bit.  Especially in a corporate environment, I could easily see some companies not wanting their employees watching videos at work.

    But there's no real benefit in making it mandatory, is there?  How hard would a checkbox be? The only reason I can think of is for Microsoft to give themselves a competitive advantage over QuickTime and Real.


    Is there anybody who isn't drunk and on drugs (at the same time), that could think of installing Realplayer?
    Seriously, that player is the worst peace of software I have seen.

    Just my (and everybody I know) 0.2$

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