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Do state Universities offer free public wireless access?

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  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    I just found out that my futuristically-minded home state doesn't offer public wireless access on state University campus. State Policy.

    We are so hip in AR   Expressionless

    How about other states? 

    It seems anti-intellectual, it isn't Homeland Security is it?

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    They probably do have wireless internet access for the students that are paying to go there, though.  It's a matter of "best use of funds".

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    I'm alumnus, so I think I qualify under the rules, but it seems just wrong, like keeping the general public from going into the University campus library and reading books. You can do that, right?

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    Sanctioned, official, university-provided wireless, no.  However, if you're within range of any dorm with >100 people, you're likely to find an open Wifi node.  Possibly because they don't know about the security defaults; possibly they're ignorant to the configuration process; possibly they just like to share.  Such is also the case in range of many university buildings such as libraries, student centers, etc.  Stumble around a little, you're bound to find something.

  • User profile image
    tayknight

    JohnAskew wrote:
    I just found out that my futuristically-minded home state doesn't offer public wireless access on state University campus. State Policy.

    We are so hip in AR  

    How about other states? 

    It seems anti-intellectual, it isn't Homeland Security is it?


    Maybe you're are the wrong university Smiley
    http://wireless.astate.edu/

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    They probably do have wireless internet access for the students that are paying to go there, though.  It's a matter of "best use of funds".


    How does offering open wireless access points on campus cost any more than authenticated access points? Do Universities pay by the byte?

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    Or you could think of it this way--  open access wireless networks provide a VERY easy way for people to just walk in and hack their network, causing serious damage and loss of service to everyone else on campus.

    Not providing open internet access is just like keeping the general public out of the library-- except that there's much more of a risk that someone will come in and trash things.

    As an alumnus, if you're really intent on getting on, you could probably talk to the computer center to find out what that involves.  Here (at my college) you just have to have a valid network login so you can put in your MAC address.

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    tayknight wrote:
    JohnAskew wrote: I just found out that my futuristically-minded home state doesn't offer public wireless access on state University campus. State Policy.

    We are so hip in AR  

    How about other states? 

    It seems anti-intellectual, it isn't Homeland Security is it?


    Maybe you're are the wrong university
    http://wireless.astate.edu/


    No, this affects you too:

    Wireless networking uses high frequency radio communications to provide up to 11 Mbps of bandwidth under optimal conditions. It is very similar to a cordless phone in that you can move anywhere within range and have connectivity.  At this site, you will find lots of information relating to the ASU wireless network.

    NOTE:  All wireless cards must be registered with the campus network.

    I just wonder if this is common for other states, or unique to ours.

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    Or you could think of it this way--  open access wireless networks provide a VERY easy way for people to just walk in and hack their network, causing serious damage and loss of service to everyone else on campus.

    Not providing open internet access is just like keeping the general public out of the library-- except that there's much more of a risk that someone will come in and trash things.

    As an alumnus, if you're really intent on getting on, you could probably talk to the computer center to find out what that involves.  Here (at my college) you just have to have a valid network login so you can put in your MAC address.


    I can get on, that's not the problem, it's our .NET user group being able to have presenters access the internet (and even evil vendors).

    How would a wireless access point on campus cause extra security vulnerabilities? Wouldn't it be implemented such that it's outside the campus network's firewalls? Wouldn't that make all those wireless connections just the same as if they were on a private line a mile away? I don't understand the technical vulnerabilities it would cause.

    What state are you studying in?

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    Tennessee, but it's a private college.

    However, the University of Tennessee (Knoxville), the University of Louisville (Kentucky), and probably most other universities do secure their networks.

    Yes, our wireless network is outside the campus firewall (for the most part).  However, I would not like it if any random person could walk up from the street and connect to the network--  they could easily just go and hack away at all the other client machines on the network.  With registrations, you can tell exactly who is responsible if this happens.  And I can't be hacked from the outside here-- we're behind a NAT.

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    Then it must be a Homeland Security mandate or a recommended "best practice" from a federal level.

    I've been looking for public wireless access described on Univ. California Berkeley, and I don't see anything that indicates they offer free public access points. If any were to do so, they would; you think?


  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    What is the mysterious security issue?

    Perhaps hotspots become magnets for cyber criminals. Sounds ridiculous to me.

    Are all state Universities too cheap to provide this?

    What IS the real problem?   Perplexed

  • User profile image
    AndyC

    It may be due to usage restrictions from the ISP (as is the case with JANET in the UK.) Another reason we require network card registration is so that we know who is in trouble when they do something prohibited by our T&Cs (such as running P2P applicatons.)

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    JohnAskew wrote:

    What is the mysterious security issue?

    Perhaps hotspots become magnets for cyber criminals. Sounds ridiculous to me.

    Are all state Universities too cheap to provide this?

    What IS the real problem?  



    Ummm...  clearly you're not a network admin, because leaving wireless access points unsecured is against security best practice.  If you insist, I'll get my campus's network security guy to come and explain to you.

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    JohnAskew wrote:

    What is the mysterious security issue?

    Perhaps hotspots become magnets for cyber criminals. Sounds ridiculous to me.

    Are all state Universities too cheap to provide this?

    What IS the real problem?  



    And to answer what the real problem is...

    Hacking clients/servers on the network
    Using network resources for things against the TOS
    Using network resources to hack outside the network
    Using network resources to cause a DoS on the local network
    ...

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    JohnAskew wrote:
    Could a wireless access network be put together on a campus that offered no more and no less security threat than a network located miles away through a different ISP?

    EDIT: it may be a new network, since the old one is so hack-able.


    Still doesn't stop the last three.

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    Could a wireless access network be put together on a campus that offered no more and no less security threat than a network located miles away through a different ISP?

    EDIT: it may be a new network, since the old one is so hack-able. or what is a NAT, anyway?

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    CannotResolveSymbol wrote:
    JohnAskew wrote: Could a wireless access network be put together on a campus that offered no more and no less security threat than a network located miles away through a different ISP?

    EDIT: it may be a new network, since the old one is so hack-able.


    Still doesn't stop the last three.


    what is a NAT and is that your final answer?          Smiley  (Regis Philbin)

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