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What is Dvorak smoking?

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  • User profile image
    wkempf

    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1925239,00.asp

    Yeah, Apple could switch to Windows and compete/survive solely on it's "high end x86 PC" line.  Not.

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    Obviously something pretty strong...

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    I think it would be a good idea.  Apple's hardware is usually high quality...higher than your average 3rd world sweatshop built hardware, and the products 'work together' very well.  They still have a good selling point and from a consistency standpoint, running windows would force the 'black turtleneck' crowd to STFU.

  • User profile image
    Karim

    wkempf wrote:
    http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,1895,1925239,00.asp

    Yeah, Apple could switch to Windows and compete/survive solely on it's "high end x86 PC" line.  Not.


    "Gadfly" is a term for people who upset the status quo by posing upsetting or novel questions, or attempts to stimulate innovation by proving an irritant.


    Carl: My guess is that Dvorak takes one of his old columns, sandwiches it between two pieces of LSD-soaked blotter paper, then shreds that into fine scraps, mixes it with Northern California sinsemilla, then smokes that.  Probably out of a handcarved Meerschaum pipe.  The combination would be flavorful, yet smooth.

    That's just a guess, though.

    "Smoking your own words" is an ancient tradition in some cultures, as old as writing itself.  The Dalai Lama told me that once.  We played golf once, on a glacier.  It represents Oroo... Oreo... Oroboros, you know, the snake that eats its own tail.  It's kind of a yin-yang thing.  Gnostics.  The eternal cycle.  Most people don't know that.  Like Manganese.  Most people don't know about that either.

  • User profile image
    wkempf

    ScanIAm wrote:
    I think it would be a good idea.  Apple's hardware is usually high quality...higher than your average 3rd world sweatshop built hardware, and the products 'work together' very well.  They still have a good selling point and from a consistency standpoint, running windows would force the 'black turtleneck' crowd to STFU.


    Undoubtedly there's a segment that would purchase these, for the reasons you give.  But that segment isn't large enough to support Apple.  Entry level users are going to opt for a Dell, or similar, for the price point and support.  Hardcore users would opt for building their own or going with various lesser known systems, usually choosing AMD processors, in order to get the best price/performance ratio.  These two segments make up the majority of computer buyers.  This leaves only a very small segment left that fit your description.

    Apple currently survives in this area because they have total lock in (and yet many of the OSS crowd loves Apple and hates MS because MS tries to lock you in, go figure).  After the move to x86, Apple is already going to have a difficult time keeping this lock in.  Remove the OS from the equation and replace it with Windows, and they won't have any chance of retaining the lock in.  At that point, their only consumers will be the complete die hards and a few yuppies.  Everyone else, including a large part of their current consumer base, will just be laughing at the concept of buying the overpriced Apple.  In order to survive, they'd have to cut prices, at which point they become just another Dell/HP.

  • User profile image
    Cairo

    ScanIAm wrote:
    I think it would be a good idea.  Apple's  products 'work together' very well. 


    Selling Windows PCs would put an end to the "Apple's products work together very well" thing. That happens because of Apple's software, as well as their limited, known set of hardware. If Apple becomes a Windows box shifter, then they're essentially competing against the Sony Vaios in the Windows market. There's no "Apple experience" left in being a maker of hardware for Microsoft.


  • User profile image
    BryanF

    I'm not so sure Apple's hardware is so much better than average in terms of quality. Currently, there's a recall notice for iBook and Powerbook G4 laptop batteries on their homepage, and I seem to recall there have been other issues over the years. I think Apple's main competitive features are the aesthetic design and user experience.

    As for Dvorak's article, I won't say never, but I will say it would be surprising. Vista will up the ante significantly. The final UI will at least approach, though not necessarily surpass, OSX's Aqua well enough such that Windows won't look dated anymore. Combine this with the raft of of other enhancements (security, networking, reliability, etc), and many of the technical advantages currently enjoyed by OSX will be greatly neutralized. Each will continue to have its own strengths and weaknesses, I'm sure, but most of them will be mostly subjective and nitpicking--fodder for slashdot.

    Even given the advances in Vista, I'm still not entirely convinced a switch to Windows would make sense for Apple. Most obviously, I can't see Steve Jobs swallowing that pill--Intel, at least, was an under the hood change. Moreover, it isn't at all clear that Apple could sustain a market advantage for very long as a seller of "high-end PCs"--eventually they'd become just another brand. Maybe they could create the "iPod of PCs", but it's still a gamble in the long term.

    EDIT: Also, consider the number of irrate customers who would abandon the company after having been "betrayed".

  • User profile image
    Yggdrasil

    He really does seem to be spouting wild ideas without actually basing them on anything. Witness his "Once Apple has OSX running on Intel boxes, they will have driver problems like Linux". This is patently false, because OSX86 isn't designed to run on generic Intel machines like Windows or Linux, but on Apple machines only, all other hardware is unsupported. For all practical purposes to a standard end-user, the new Macs are just like the old Macs, but with a different electronic thingamajig inside. The quality and interoperability of the hardware will probably not change. Hacked OSX86 running on generic hardware will probably be a (I need to watch my language) to maintain due to unsupported drivers, but is entirely irrelevant.

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    Steve411

    Can't wait!

    - Steve

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    rjdohnert

    I think Dvorak is full of it.  Mac OS X is probably the better OS.  But when Microsoft delivers Win Vista, Microsoft will definately overtake Mac OS X as the most innovative platform. 

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    jwfisher

    Of course it would eventually make financial sense for Apple. They can't survive by continuing to fund a proprietary PC and o/s. But a major "guru" factor (mostly poseur flash, because it's all appearance and not functional reality) would be lost by adapting Windows, even under the covers. If "I was a betting man" (an expression here in Texas) I wouldn't bet on this. I never bet on Dvorak anyway!

    What would make sense is for Apple to open up their proprietary hardware to the world. Let their o/s run on other hardware - that is the *key* to high adoption. That is something they could do immediately... and save the super high cost of their own manufacturing plant - except:

    Reality is, Apple doesn't have the development budget or financial model to provide the necessary s/w infrastructure inside the o/s to allow it to run on other hardware (zero innovation there on their part). They barely have the infrastructure built into their product to allow users to buy a peice of Apple-proprietary hardware at FRYs and hope it will run. Forget about any other cool piece of hardware/accessory customers spot at that or any other non-proprietary store. 

    This is the bottom line reality their development team and product planners has to face. But, I also think that "proprietariness" is company (aka founder) policy - hence the iPod mess. 

    Apple is too frustrating... IMHO this latest move to Intel is desparation on their part. I've been peripherally playing around with them for years... I won't waste any more time on them.

  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    Their current model makes a lot of sense and thats what keeps Apple relevant.  Apple targets a certain set of audiences, the extremely creative.  I know of no major artist, save Jamie here on C9 that uses Windows.  As long as Apple keeps targetting that Audience and unfortunately Windows Vista will not change it, then Apple will succeed.  if by some unlikely chance that a lot of the creative types move to Windows Vista then Apple will be in trouble.  but Apple targets content creators, audio/visual gurus and motion picture creators and thats proved successful.

    jwfisher wrote:
    Of course it would eventually make financial sense for Apple. They can't survive by continuing to create a proprietary PC and o/s. But a major "guru" factor (mostly poseur flash, because it's all appearance and not functional reality) would be lost by adapting Windows, even under the covers. If "I was a betting man" (an expression here in Texas) I wouldn't bet on this. I never bet on Dvorak anyway!

    What would make sense is for Apple to open up their proprietary hardware to the world. Let their o/s run on other hardware - that is the *key* to high adoption. That is something they could do immediately... and save the super high cost of their own manufacturing plant - except:

    Reality is, Apple doesn't have the development budget or financial model to provide the necessary s/w infrastructure inside the o/s to allow it to run on other hardware (zero innovation there on their part). They barely have the infrastructure built into their product to allow users to buy a peice of Apple-proprietary hardware at FRYs and hope it will run. Forget about any other cool piece of hardware/accessory customers spot at that or any other non-proprietary store. 

    This is the bottom line reality their development team and product planners has to face. But, I also think that "proprietariness" is company (aka founder) policy - hence the iPod mess. 

    Apple is too frustrating... IMHO this latest move to Intel is desparation on their part. I've been peripherally playing around with them for years... I won't waste any more time on them.

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