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Got to give Google the credit

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  • User profile image
    arunpv

    US Department of Justice narrows focus for Google demands 3:29PM The US Department of Justice has agreed to a much narrower focus for the US administration to force Google to hand over user information as evidence to back up child (I need to watch my language) legislation. US District Court Judge James Ware told a hearing yesterday that he would likely approve the reduced request and intends 'to grant some relief to the government'. Since Google stood its ground and refused to hand over user data on a random sample of millions of searches and web addresses, the DoJ has now culled its request to around 5,000 search terms and 50,000 web addresses.While this compromise  will still leave Google having to intrude on its users' privacy that it is so keen to protect, the scope is now greatly narrowed. It certainly shows Google in a better light than its rivals such as AOL, Microsoft and Yahoo! which conceded to the DoJ's initial subpoenas.

    http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/84797/us-department-of-justice-narrows-focus-for-google-demands.html

    <its good to see atleast google fought back compared to MS/AOL/Yahoo>

  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    I think what the government asked for was very reasonable.  But Google fought it, they didnt win and I think they need to end this quietly before they screw themselves in the long run.

  • User profile image
    arunpv

    rjdohnert wrote:
    I think what the government asked for was very reasonable.  But Google fought it, they didnt win and I think they need to end this quietly before they screw themselves in the long run.


    Correct. They didn't win but atleast fought back compared rivals who silently submitted what you and i search on their website.Sad

  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    I think that these search engines release information on what we search for when they release the monthly top searches.  No individual information was given out but that also brings up the part Im sorta two faced about.  How will they know the age of the people who searched those terms.  If they really wanted to get to individuals they wouldnt need Google, just monitor the little black box that all ISP's are required by federal law to have plugged in at all times.

    arunpv wrote:
    rjdohnert wrote: I think what the government asked for was very reasonable.  But Google fought it, they didnt win and I think they need to end this quietly before they screw themselves in the long run.


    Correct. They didn't win but atleast fought back compared rivals who silently submitted what you and i search on their website.

  • User profile image
    arunpv

    Or just go to Alexa they have almost everything....

    Good point if they just want search terms and web addresses then how do they know who searched?? whats the point in asking for these search terms from Search engines.... i smell something here...Wink



  • User profile image
    Tom Servo

    I don't get it. MSN Search claimed that the government asked for a list of keywords and their frequency ONLY. Nothing more, no IP addresses or anything.

  • User profile image
    ruiyiz

    I'd like to make a point that Google won't hand in their user data because they know too much information for individual users. Guess why. If you have logged in your google account while do search, all your search terms will be recorded in google personal search directly associated with users' account, and suprisingly this service is a opt-out but not a opt-in.

    Msn and Yahoo have no concern like that. They don't record search term for individual user, at least from a perspective of users. So they aren't afraid to trigger a panic. But it's totally different story for google. If google chose to submit their data, all their users will question whether their identities are submitted with search terms.

    In the near future, Google will face more and more privacy concerns because it takes a way of aggresively collecting users' data. Actually I thought the strategy of collecting as much as user's data is evil, even if they don't exploit it by now. But who knows!

    Corporations are not dependable, because it can turn it back to you at anytime it wants.

  • User profile image
    joem83

    The sad part about the whole thing is they store your information and then sell it to advertisers.

    ruiyiz wrote:
    I'd like to make a point that Google won't hand in their user data because they know too much information for individual users. Guess why. If you have logged in your google account while do search, all your search terms will be recorded in google personal search directly associated with users' account, and suprisingly this service is a opt-out but not a opt-in.

    Msn and Yahoo have no concern like that. They don't record search term for individual user, at least from a perspective of users. So they aren't afraid to trigger a panic. But it's totally different story for google. If google chose to submit their data, all their users will question whether their identities are submitted with search terms.

    In the near future, Google will face more and more privacy concerns because it takes a way of aggresively collecting users' data. Actually I thought the strategy of collecting as much as user's data is evil, even if they don't exploit it by now. But who knows!

    Corporations are not dependable, because it can turn it back to you at anytime it wants.

  • User profile image
    Cornelius Ellsonpeter

    The article wrote:
    Google had argued that the information sought did not further the government's aim of proving the effectiveness or otherwise of Internet filtering systems at protecting children from accessing inappropriate content.
    I'm still at a loss to figure out what Google has to do with "Internet filtering systems".  Are they comparing what is in Google's search engine with test results from computers with "filtering" on them (i.e. a public library)? Why wouldn't they go to where the "filters" are and try to type in a bunch of words to see what individual search engines kick back? Or does "moderate safe search is on" on Google count as filtering? Maybe I am misunderstanding this whole thing? Something seems odd about this whole request...

  • User profile image
    arunpv

    ruiyiz wrote:
    I'd like to make a point that Google won't hand in their user data because they know too much information for individual users. Guess why. If you have logged in your google account while do search, all your search terms will be recorded in google personal search directly associated with users' account, and suprisingly this service is a opt-out but not a opt-in.

    Msn and Yahoo have no concern like that. They don't record search term for individual user, at least from a perspective of users. So they aren't afraid to trigger a panic. But it's totally different story for google. If google chose to submit their data, all their users will question whether their identities are submitted with search terms.

    In the near future, Google will face more and more privacy concerns because it takes a way of aggresively collecting users' data. Actually I thought the strategy of collecting as much as user's data is evil, even if they don't exploit it by now. But who knows!

    Corporations are not dependable, because it can turn it back to you at anytime it wants.


    Check this out
    this is Yahoo........

  • Yahoo! collects personal information when you register with Yahoo!, when you use Yahoo! products or services, when you visit Yahoo! pages or the pages of certain Yahoo! partners, and when you enter promotions or sweepstakes. Yahoo! may combine information about you that we have with information we obtain from business partners or other companies.
  • When you register we ask for information such as your name, email address, birth date, gender, zip code, occupation, industry, and personal interests. For some financial products and services we may also ask for your address, Social Security number, and information about your assets. Once you register with Yahoo! and sign in to our services, you are not anonymous to us.
  • Yahoo! collects information about your transactions with us and with some of our business partners, including information about your use of financial products and services that we offer.
  • Yahoo! automatically receives and records information on our server logs from your browser, including your IP address, Yahoo! cookie information, and the page you request.
  • Yahoo! uses information for the following general purposes: to customize the advertising and content you see, fulfill your requests for products and services, improve our services, contact you, conduct research, and provide anonymous reporting for internal and external clients.

    MSN

    We may collect information about your visit, including the pages you view, the links you click and other actions taken in connection with Microsoft sites and services. We also collect certain standard information that your browser sends to every website you visit, such as your IP address, browser type and language, access times and referring Web site addresses.


    We use the information we collect to provide the services you request. Our services may include the display of personalized content and advertising.

  • We use your information to inform you of other products or services offered by Microsoft and its affiliates, and to send you relevant survey invitations related to Microsoft services.
  • We do not sell, rent, or lease our customer lists to third parties. In order to help provide our services, we occasionally provide information to other companies that work on our behalf.
  • We use cookies and other technologies to keep track of your interactions with our sites and services to offer a personalized experience.
  • User profile image
    Jason Cox

    This had nothing to do with user privacy or Google's claim of divulging trade secrests, it was just a huge PR/marketing move. Google made the nightly news for a few weeks making themselves look like a knight in shining armor out to protect your privacy online and most people will buy it.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    I think Google's reason for not doing it is that this stuff is being asked of them with no subpoena or anything. And I agree with them. If the Department of Justice needs the stuff, then they should get a subpoena to get it. Not just a strong fist.

  • User profile image
    Harlequin

    "...to force Google to hand over user information as evidence..."

    The bolded word is the magic one... Cool

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    Harlequin wrote:
    I think Google's reason for not doing it is that this stuff is being asked of them with no subpoena or anything. And I agree with them. If the Department of Justice needs the stuff, then they should get a subpoena to get it. Not just a strong fist.


    It was a subpoena.

  • User profile image
    ruiyiz

    arunpv wrote:
    ruiyiz wrote: I'd like to make a point that Google won't hand in their user data because they know too much information for individual users. Guess why. If you have logged in your google account while do search, all your search terms will be recorded in google personal search directly associated with users' account, and suprisingly this service is a opt-out but not a opt-in.

    Msn and Yahoo have no concern like that. They don't record search term for individual user, at least from a perspective of users. So they aren't afraid to trigger a panic. But it's totally different story for google. If google chose to submit their data, all their users will question whether their identities are submitted with search terms.

    In the near future, Google will face more and more privacy concerns because it takes a way of aggresively collecting users' data. Actually I thought the strategy of collecting as much as user's data is evil, even if they don't exploit it by now. But who knows!

    Corporations are not dependable, because it can turn it back to you at anytime it wants.


    Check this out
    this is Yahoo........

  • Yahoo! collects personal information when you register with Yahoo!, when you use Yahoo! products or services, when you visit Yahoo! pages or the pages of certain Yahoo! partners, and when you enter promotions or sweepstakes. Yahoo! may combine information about you that we have with information we obtain from business partners or other companies.
  • When you register we ask for information such as your name, email address, birth date, gender, zip code, occupation, industry, and personal interests. For some financial products and services we may also ask for your address, Social Security number, and information about your assets. Once you register with Yahoo! and sign in to our services, you are not anonymous to us.
  • Yahoo! collects information about your transactions with us and with some of our business partners, including information about your use of financial products and services that we offer.
  • Yahoo! automatically receives and records information on our server logs from your browser, including your IP address, Yahoo! cookie information, and the page you request.
  • Yahoo! uses information for the following general purposes: to customize the advertising and content you see, fulfill your requests for products and services, improve our services, contact you, conduct research, and provide anonymous reporting for internal and external clients.

    MSN

    We may collect information about your visit, including the pages you view, the links you click and other actions taken in connection with Microsoft sites and services. We also collect certain standard information that your browser sends to every website you visit, such as your IP address, browser type and language, access times and referring Web site addresses.


    We use the information we collect to provide the services you request. Our services may include the display of personalized content and advertising.

  • We use your information to inform you of other products or services offered by Microsoft and its affiliates, and to send you relevant survey invitations related to Microsoft services.
  • We do not sell, rent, or lease our customer lists to third parties. In order to help provide our services, we occasionally provide information to other companies that work on our behalf.
  • We use cookies and other technologies to keep track of your interactions with our sites and services to offer a personalized experience.

  • Thanks for your reference. I would confess that I wan't aware that Yahoo and MSN has been recording my search terms. Yes I am an average user of search engines, so I didn't know what Yahoo and MSN were doing, but the point here is, I did know Google was spying on me. Why? Because they announced a service called Personalized Search loudly.

    On the topic of DoJ requests, it doesn't matter who is recording search terms. The perception of users is the biggest issue here. As what I stated, average users didn't care what Yahoo and MSN did, cause they even didn't know that their searches are recorded. But they knew Google did it. The worse thing is that the users of Google are likely more frenetic than the users who are using other search engines. You can't expect what actions they will take if they found Google betray them.

    I am not saying that Google is worse than Yahoo and MSN. What I am stating here is that Google is also a corporation, it's just as evil as Yahoo and Microsoft (the evilest guy in the universe in many guys' mind[6]). Don't build your heavenly dream on Google.

  • User profile image
    arunpv

    Agreed. I am not saying Google is the best but atleast they made aware of fact that they are fighting against it even though they may lose in the end. But Yahoo/MSN they backstabbed us silently(not that it matters) Its been more than 2-3months i did a search on Yahoo or MSN.  All are same and in the end we are the loser.Perplexed

    We use their product and they use our activities and sell and make money(Evil).


  • User profile image
    BryanF

    I dunno... While I definitely think that Google's defiance was at least in part a publicity stunt, I think they may also have been trying to avoid setting a precedent. I don't think Yahoo and MSN sold us out per se; as the MSN Search team described it, the information was fairly innocuous. Still, as heavy handed as this administration has been, I admit I've not minded watching them have to justify their actions beforehand for once...

  • User profile image
    arunpv

    BryanF wrote:
    I dunno... While I definitely think that Google's defiance was at least in part a publicity stunt, I think they may also have been trying to avoid setting a precedent. I don't think Yahoo and MSN sold us out per se; as the MSN Search team described it, the information was fairly innocuous. Still, as heavy handed as this administration has been, I admit I've not minded watching them have to justify their actions beforehand for once...


    It may be a publicity stunt. But i still don't trust anyone. I don't trust my work phone, it rings when i am in the replying this, to my surprise its my boss asking "Did you finish the work?"ExpressionlessPerplexed

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