Coffeehouse Thread

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Who has the biggest ripped cd and dvd collection here?

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  • User profile image
    keithcombs

    I was wondering who has bragging rights here.  I was actually wondering how the hell you store all of your stuff.

    I just wrote an article and screencast about iSCSI but I wondered if any of you have built a SAN to store your collection.

    Anyone want to offer what you are using?  I'm probably going to build a bad box soon for HDTV recording so I'm looking to get some ideas on the cabinet, back plains, array controllers, GigE nics, etc.

    Thanks,

    Keith

    fyi, the post is at http://blogs.technet.com/keithcombs/archive/2006/03/26/423149.aspx

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    Ripped DVDs? Is that an MS employee encouraging people to break the DCMA?

    Smiley

    I keep meaning to get a NAS for home, but I want a windows powered one, so I can stream my music to wherever I am (it's all WMA). And they're just stupidly expensive compared to the same box with an alertnative OS.

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    keithcombs wrote:
    I was wondering who has bragging rights here.  I was actually wondering how the hell you store all of your stuff.

    I just wrote an article and screencast about iSCSI but I wondered if any of you have built a SAN to store your collection.

    Anyone want to offer what you are using?  I'm probably going to build a bad box soon for HDTV recording so I'm looking to get some ideas on the cabinet, back plains, array controllers, GigE nics, etc.

    Thanks,

    Keith

    fyi, the post is at http://blogs.technet.com/keithcombs/archive/2006/03/26/423149.aspx


    I store my stuff across an array of 8 hard drives: A 300 and a bunch of 120's. I'm considering getting a few 500's to use as a backup solution, as it takes a long time [edit: "And a bunch of money"] to back all this stuff up to DVD-R's. 

    Then again, if I buy "a few 500's", I may just use the existing ones for backup.

  • User profile image
    keithcombs

    Yea, all of the NAS devices seem to want a premium.  That's why I'm probably going to build my own. 

  • User profile image
    Manip

    I store all my data on my internal IDE drives. I often outgrow the disk and it gets upgraded... I am currently on 70GB and 250GB drives, but the 70 is heading towards being replaced by an additional 250GB drive.

    I backup using one of these.

    I don't backup DVDs and have given up buying music CDs completely.

    My "media" is currently filling 100GB of space....

    I organise something like this (with folders).

    /Media/Music
    /Media/Movies
    /Media/Photos
    /Media/<etc>

    The music folder is a complete mess... I have albums with their own folders, I have 'mixed' music with its own folders, and random pieces of music all over the place. I have given up trying to organise it for now; adding iTunes into the mix as ONLY made things worse... I don't want to mix my iTunes music in with the MP3s, WMAs and OGG files or else I might loose track of it.

    I doubt very much my collection is the biggest (or even close)... But I have (number of files):

    WMA, MP3, OGG, WAV, MIDI : 5,393
    M4P (iTunes) : 190
    WMV, AVI, MOV, DIVX, MPG, ASF : 38
    OTHER / UNKNOWN : 549 (1.5GB)





  • User profile image
    blowdart

    keithcombs wrote:
    Yea, all of the NAS devices seem to want a premium.  That's why I'm probably going to build my own. 


    Not all of us can get company store OS prices Tongue Out

    It's strange, you'd think some of the case manufacturers would have realised people want NAS devices with hot swap disks and a small footprint and provide their own shells, to which you could add a mini ITX motherboard. But no, you have to get a stupidly big and noisy case or get the dremel out ....


  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    Manip wrote:
    I store all my data on my internal My "media" is currently filling 100GB of space.... 

    We all know I take every opportunity to show off, so I will... I had to buy a new 300GB drive and dedicate exclusively to media (audio, video, docs)... It overflowed onto one of the drives it replaced. I filled up a 300GB drive within an hour of buying it. It was sweet.

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    blowdart wrote:
    It's strange, you'd think some of the case manufacturers would have realised people want NAS devices with hot swap disks and a small footprint and provide their own shells, to which you could add a mini ITX motherboard. But no, you have to get a stupidly big and noisy case or get the dremel out ....


    I honestly don't understand all these unusual and exotic solutions people come up with for large storage.  Just do what I do:  Add hard drives.  For every four drives, add another controller card. For every ~300-450W of power consumption, add another PSU. Short pins 4 and 6 and set it near the case.

  • User profile image
    Manip

    I really can't see how people could fill 300GB of space with media... I use 100GB and I could cut that by 20GB or more just by dumping stuff I don't listen to and removing all the duplicate tracks. In fact I'll go one step further and say that I could live with just what is on my 2GB iPod...

    Unless you are ripping (or downloading) DVD quality movies or entire television series then it is difficult to explain.

     

  • User profile image
    Ideas Man

    There was a video posted here around the time Channel9 started where some guy made a NAS using Windows embedded, it looked really cool too, should have a look at it and invest in building one of those. It was really small, looked cool, and it ran Windows.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    SlackmasterK wrote:


    I honestly don't understand all these unusual and exotic solutions people come up with for large storage.  Just do what I do:  Add hard drives.  For every four drives, add another controller card. For every ~300-450W of power consumption, add another PSU. Short pins 4 and 6 and set it near the case.


    Simple. I don't want a big hulking noise generator. I want a nice quick, hot swapable, raid array with 1Tb which will sit in a corner and just work.

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    Ideas Man wrote:
    There was a video posted here around the time Channel9 started where some guy made a NAS using Windows embedded, it looked really cool too, should have a look at it and invest in building one of those. It was really small, looked cool, and it ran Windows.


    What's the advantage of running Windows though? A Linux/BSD-based NAS would cost less, have lower system requirements, still run all your apps (Wine/MONO), and still be compatible (Samba).

  • User profile image
    Deactivated User

    Comment removed at user's request.

  • User profile image
    blowdart

    W3bbo wrote:
    Ideas Man wrote:There was a video posted here around the time Channel9 started where some guy made a NAS using Windows embedded, it looked really cool too, should have a look at it and invest in building one of those. It was really small, looked cool, and it ran Windows.


    What's the advantage of running Windows though? A Linux/BSD-based NAS would cost less, have lower system requirements, still run all your apps (Wine/MONO), and still be compatible (Samba).


    I want server on there so I can stream my WMA and WMVs.

    And please, don't try to pretend, like real does, that their software does it well.

  • User profile image
    Angus

    Well, I have a very small media collection; about 1Gb of music, maybe 6Gb of videos, and about 300Mb of images.

    I have a very organised system; for music for instance, I have this sort of organisation scheme:

    \Music\<Artist Name>\<Artist Name> + "Tracks"\

    and if there are a few pictures of the aritst I have this:


    \Music\<Artist Name>\<Artist Name> + "Pictures"\

    Every track is properly named and has the correct information; that was the part that took hours to do.

    I am hoping to put all my media and some specific documents onto this server I have and use it as something that I can access media from all over my house, even if my main computer is off.

    It is a very basic setup, but I am using it to learn how to do things the right way.

    Angus Higgins

  • User profile image
    Red5

    Over the years I've converted about 160 of my CDs to MP3's - about 15-18GB total.

    I also back up my movies in 320x(240 or whatever the aspect ratio is), 400kbps, which is about 50 movies or so at about 400-500MB per movie.

    My jpeg's from the family digital camera take up about 1.5GB.

    I need a backup solution, as the content is all on dvd-r media now.

  • User profile image
    DCMonkey

    I recently bought a 200GB Maxtor Shared Storage NAS for $250. It even runs Linux (not that the user ever has to care). With a firmware upgrade it functions as a uPNP media server so I can stream to my Roku Soundbridge. I imagine it can do video streaming to the appropriate device. They also make 300GB and 500GB models.

    My current music collection is 21.2 GB (smaller than I thought), mostly ripped from my own CDs. I store the CDs on a Boltz rack.

     

  • User profile image
    Karim

    These work for me:

    http://www.macgurus.com/productpages/sata/satakits.php

    2 drive SATA enclosure = $136, 4 drive = $254, 8 drive = $451.  (They also offer 3-, 4-, and 5-drive enclosures.)

    Get the drives & SATA card from Newegg.  Instructions for slapping it together:

    http://www.macgurus.com/productpages/sata/sataguide_1.php

    The great thing about SATA is that you can do anything with the drives in Windows: spanned, mirrored, striped, RAID-5, JBOD.  Some SATA cards have HW support for RAID (e.g. 0+1).  If a drive starts to flake out, you'll get error messages in the System Event Log (unlike a NAS device, where you might have to set up SNMP).  Also you get all that SATA performance (not limited to NIC speed, doesn't add network traffic, don't need another IP, etc.)

    You can get 6' SATA cables so the array doesn't have to be immediately adjacent to the computer, and they are a LOT cheaper than SCSI cables...

    When you want to increase the volume size, just throw another drive in the enclosure (or buy a new enclosure) and extend your NTFS dynamic spanned volume.  No need to reboot.

    If your computer blows up, just plug the enclosure into another computer and import the foreign volume.

    MacGurus also has removable enclosures.

    Disclaimer: I don't profit directly or indirectly from the suggestions made.  Just a satisfied customer. Big Smile

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