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Is your app "Certified for Windows"?

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  • User profile image
    Larsenal

    Three questions for the Niners:

    1) If you see that an app is "Certified for Windows" does that influence your purchase decision?

    2) Do you think that this certification is worth the trouble?  (Our product is a mission-critical server app for large companies?)

    3) As a dev, have you ever gone through the certification process?  If so, what advice would you give to a team that has never done it?

  • User profile image
    Ion Todirel

    1. no.
    2. no.
    3. no.

  • User profile image
    dahat

    1) no
    2) depends on your customer target and how they respond to #1
    3) no

  • User profile image
    keeron

    1. No

    2. Yes. If you are developing for a specific platform (i.e. windows in this case), its good to make sure it runs on the platform well and that the application is aware of the platform limitations. You could put these in the feature design/requirements, but a formal testing process (the certification testing) really helps nail these down to the core.

    3. Yes, for most of our products (over last several years) we have been getting certified for win xp/ win2k. Now with Vista, its even more challenging and we are trying to make the product get fully certified. Its tough, but in the end it helps a lot knowing that you aren't assuming something or hacking something against the OS. Also, gives a seamless expereince to the user. Specially with the new Vista certification requirements (like having to use the restart manager, 64-bit compatibility, etc).

    For teams starting out first time, I'd say don't over do it (i.e. make signficicant changes inside your archtecture to get thru all the certification requirements. If its easily doable, then do it.). I've seen lot of ugly hacks getting taken care of when we went to xp/2k certification... so the process will definately help you (even if you don't get the actual certification). Its like another set of test cases that you get for free Smiley

    - Keeron

  • User profile image
    littleguru

    How much does "certified for X" cost?

  • User profile image
    koorb

    No
    Yes
    No

    The only reason why the second one is yes is because I have seen some of the worst damage poorly programmed apps can do.

  • User profile image
    DoomBringer

    I dunno, but there are two question 2s.

  • User profile image
    Larsenal

    DoomBringer wrote:
    I dunno, but there are two question 2s.


    Oops!  I guess my post wasn't "Certified for Windows."

  • User profile image
    keeron

    littleguru wrote:
    How much does "certified for X" cost?


    Depends, usually you go to company like VeriTest and do they will test your product... or you get a 500 page manual and get one of your QA engineer to spend few months on going thru the slew of tests. The QA option - free (apart from the pizzas you feed him) ... if you go via other companies, they usually charge few thousand dollars.

    Last few years we've had someone in the team so much expereinced with the certification testing (he was testing virtually every product in the company - we have over 30 active projects) ... now we just use him and the 500 page manual to go over these tests once in our project cycle. The issues/ bugs found agianst these tests are considered high priority (some of them do get deffered as the consumer might not care how our app behaved when he switched the users or turned on some obscure windows util)

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    keeron wrote:
    littleguru wrote:How much does "certified for X" cost?


    Depends, usually you go to company like VeriTest and do they will test your product... or you get a 500 page manual and get one of your QA engineer to spend few months on going thru the slew of tests. The QA option - free (apart from the pizzas you feed him) ... if you go via other companies, they usually charge few thousand dollars.

    Last few years we've had someone in the team so much expereinced with the certification testing (he was testing virtually every product in the company - we have over 30 active projects) ... now we just use him and the 500 page manual to go over these tests once in our project cycle. The issues/ bugs found agianst these tests are considered high priority (some of them do get deffered as the consumer might not care how our app behaved when he switched the users or turned on some obscure windows util)


    ...doesn't Microsoft still need to give it a final going-over?

    Interesting two-faced company Microsoft is. One of the requirements for getting the "Designed for Windows XP" sticker is that the program must use the native Windows "Open" and "Save" dialog boxes. Office 2003 uses neither (it uses its own[1], like it has done ever since Office 2000), as well as whole slew of really bad HCI designs I'm not going to go into here.

    [1]Not even an "extended" dialog box like Photoshop uses, you can tell this from all the custom controls and features the dialog box has that are physically impossible to add to an "extended" stock dialog box[2]

    [2]Disclaimer: I have never done that part of shell programming, I may be wrong.

  • User profile image
    zzzzz

    1:NO  
    2:NO
    3:NO

  • User profile image
    Tensor

    And yet no one has mentioned the best reason for getting certified for windows on your app - it gets you a huge pile of partner points. And being an MS partner DOES make a difference. It makes the difference between getting business and not.

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