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Yukon & Enterprise Manager?

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  • User profile image
    darklotus

    A friend of mine is testing Yukon and i stopped by his office the other day and was taking a look at it. Where is enterprize manager? I was going to create a database and see how it handled the clr, i was able to create the database in the Workshop thing, but it didnt give me any menus to create the tables. I know i can do it manually using T-SQL, but that takes too long at times, especially for a quick table. Any ideas on how to accomplish this like enterprise manager?

  • User profile image
    ktegels

    darklotus wrote:
    A friend of mine is testing Yukon and i stopped by his office the other day and was taking a look at it. Where is enterprize manager? I was going to create a database and see how it handled the clr, i was able to create the database in the Workshop thing, but it didnt give me any menus to create the tables. I know i can do it manually using T-SQL, but that takes too long at times, especially for a quick table. Any ideas on how to accomplish this like enterprise manager?


    One of the things you'll learn with the current bits is to parrot the UI: "This feature not yet implemented."

    There likely won't be a version of EM as we know it today, instead, EM, QA, Profiler and DTS tool all run as one tool called "SQL Workbench." While that's nice, is also a bit of pain because they been focusing on the engine bits rather than the UI bits. On the other hand, that really not so bad because its made me less reliant on the UI to do things and that's making me do higher quality work the first time.

    Not sure if Workbench will be in the next beta or not. I seem to recall some discussion about it changing again too.

    At the same time, what I'd recommend to developers is using the Visual Studio 2005 bits with SqlServer and Database Projects. Those bits work a lot better for the stuff you are likely to be working with at this point.

    Hooking up Access is another way to do this, of course, but that's not very cool. Smiley

  • User profile image
    darklotus

    Will the PDC version of Visual Studio work? Or do i need to download the 2.6gb file from MSDN?

  • User profile image
    Sabot

    I've migrated from Oracle, one of the big selling points of my migration was to get away from using SQL Plus command line, this just slowed me down. I can design databases thats not a problem, but I don't want to waste time! I want to make them quickly!!!

    I would strongly suggest that that an Enterprise like manager is included!

    Remember guys, developers for the main part do not make databases DBA do's! A DBA isn't going to have a need for Visual Studio.

    The great thing about Enterprise Manager is the ease and flexibility it gives, take that away and I'm only going to buy a tool that gives me that flexibility. Dont you want my money????

    Guys, don't aim the gun at your feet ... and don't do an Oracle, dont try and second guess how people are going to use their database and find everyone is migrating because the next best thing is easier. Remember people prefer flexibility and ease of use over power, because most companies do not require a powerful database most of the time.

    Anyway, thats my five pence!

    Cheers,

    Dave


  • User profile image
    ktegels

    darklotus wrote:
    Will the PDC version of Visual Studio work? Or do i need to download the 2.6gb file from MSDN?


    Nope, at least, not yet, since they use two versions of the runtime.

  • User profile image
    ktegels

    Sabot wrote:


    Remember guys, developers for the main part do not make databases DBA do's! A DBA isn't going to have a need for Visual Studio.

    The great thing about Enterprise Manager is the ease and flexibility it gives, take that away and I'm only going to buy a tool that gives me that flexibility. Dont you want my money????



    Dave, I'm sorry if I gave you the impression that Yukon requires Visual Studio.net. It does't for the kind of stuff you're talking about here. I think you'll probably like workbench when you see it since it combines so much stuff into one shell.

    Where Studio becomes essential is if you are building CLR-based objects like non-TSQL UD(A|T|F) and stored procedures.

    But, ultimately, the old order of DBAs just doing "the care and feeding" of RDBMS and programmers just writing applications is going become a competitive disadvantage. Its the teams that integrate DBAs with developers rather than those that partition them that will kick butt with Yukon. Then their is this whole PL/SQL-like empowerment of DB programming in the SqlServer class.

    As DBAs, we're going to have to understand the implications and help make the best total system.

  • User profile image
    darklotus

    So SQL Workbench will be the new design for EM? Will i need to brush up on my T-SQL skills to create the tables, or will the designer be back? I guess its better to write it out just takes longer.

  • User profile image
    ktegels

    darklotus wrote:
    So SQL Workbench will be the new design for EM? Will i need to brush up on my T-SQL skills to create the tables, or will the designer be back? I guess its better to write it out just takes longer.
    I'm sure the designer will be around, and will probably be the same (or very similar) to the one in VS2005.

  • User profile image
    EuanG

    Kent is spot on, all the stuff that EM could do (and more) will be available in Workbench.

    -Euan

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