Coffeehouse Thread

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Adobe pulls XPS support from Office

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  • androidi

    http://blogs.msdn.com/andy_simonds/archive/2006/06/02/XPSAdobe.aspx

    Office team is making both PDF and XPS ‘save-as’ support as free downloads, instead of built into Office directly.  This is too bad, but is designed to try and resolve any concerns Adobe has with XPS or PDF functionality as part of Office.


    For several years we have been sharing detailed plans on XPS with Adobe.  I’d say almost to an excess, we kept them up to speed on our designs and implementation at every step
    ...
    Unfortunately, Adobe has been pushing for us to remove XPS from Windows.
    ...
    in order to accommodate Adobe’s concerns, we have made it so OEMs making PCs can choose to not include XPS as part of Windows.



    I am not quite clear on what exactly is meant by the "from/part of Windows".

  • Sourcecode

    androidi wrote:
    http://blogs.msdn.com/andy_simonds/archive/2006/06/02/XPSAdobe.aspx

    Office team is making both PDF and XPS ‘save-as’ support as free downloads, instead of built into Office directly.  This is too bad, but is designed to try and resolve any concerns Adobe has with XPS or PDF functionality as part of Office.


    So someone please tell me why MS would bow down to Adobe if MS was doing nothing wrong here? As per the other thread on the same subject.  Why would Adobe freak out if MS was not being a dip stick?

  • BryanF

    Essentially, this is extortion. The competition between these two companies is just heating up and the upcoming releases of the Expression Suite, WPF/E and XPS are going push things into full swing.

    Microsoft has been found to have engaged in anticompetitive practices in the past, which has left a black mark competitors seem increasingly willing to exploit when it suits them--look at Google (IE7 search provider) or Symantec (Vista backup technology--though this may prove to less absurd than Google's claim once we know more particulars).

    Previous discussions have demonstrated that the economic, legal and political definitions of a monopoly are far from harmoninous. I won't try to argue through it all, but I do think it's worth pointing out that this is not a favorable trend.

  • alwaysmc2

    I don't see the problem if both formats are equally accesable.

    Wait, OEMs can leave it out of Windows, like if if you buy a computer from company X you won't be able to read XPS documents without downloading an upgrade?  That seems antiprogressive to me...

  • brian8480

    My guess would be that this came out of MS-Legal. They're probably afraid of a potential anti-trust lawsuit. Granted they would both be accessible as Save As but, I believe theoretically Adobe would still have a case as the XPS is integrated with Vista out of the box and Acrobat might not be. Also, if XPS appears before PDF in the list (such as the preselected format), they could potentially claim their technology is being restricted from exposure to the end-user. It feels very much like childish wining to the playground teacher in the school yard but, that's the law.

  • jmacdonagh

    brian8480 wrote:
    My guess would be that this came out of MS-Legal. They're probably afraid of a potential anti-trust lawsuit. Granted they would both be accessible as Save As but, I believe theoretically Adobe would still have a case as the XPS is integrated with Vista out of the box and Acrobat might not be. Also, if XPS appears before PDF in the list (such as the preselected format), they could potentially claim their technology is being restricted from exposure to the end-user. It feels very much like childish wining to the playground teacher in the school yard but, that's the law.


    Actually in the latest builds, PDF appears before XPS.

  • ElucidWeb

    BryanF wrote:
    Essentially, this is extortion. The competition between these two companies is just heating up and the upcoming releases of the Expression Suite, WPF/E and XPS are going push things into full swing.

    Microsoft has been found to have engaged in anticompetitive practices in the past, which has left a black mark competitors seem increasingly willing to exploit when it suits them--look at Google (IE7 search provider) or Symantec (Vista backup technology--though this may prove to less absurd than Google's claim once we know more particulars).

    Previous discussions have demonstrated that the economic, legal and political definitions of a monopoly are far from harmoninous. I won't try to argue through it all, but I do think it's worth pointing out that this is not a favorable trend.


    Anti-Competetive laws should never interfere with technological advancement as it stunts human growth.  Also the law becomes a bit grey when it comes to companies that are so good at what they do no one can compete effectively with them. So in turn they get sued for advancing their technology to a point where it is crushing the competition.

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