Coffeehouse Thread

23 posts

Scoble on Newsnight, clip downloadable here

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  • W3bbo

    I asked Adam if he could put this up on the C9 videos section, but he went AFK.

    But anyway, for those not wanting to watch the whole stream from the BBC (that won't be live in a week's time anyway) here's the full interview.

    It's 7 minutes, 30 seconds long, WMV format
    .

  • out180

    Thank you, I appreciate you making that available.

  • Cybermagell​an

    He looks super nervous

  • Cyonix

    Thanks W3bbo, and well done Scoble. Good interview.

  • Escamillo

    Thanks for this, W3bbo. Smiley

  • irascian

    Thanks for posting this. Don't know what happened: I turned on to Newsnight a few minutes late (mag said it started at 11pm) and got film discussion about "Thank you for Smoking" and then spotted on here that it had already been broadcast.

    Robert done good. This was a tough interview but he got some good points across.

    I'm just annoyed that when Newsnight had that Bill Gates special interview the Rottweiler Jeremy Paxman got totally blinded by power and money and became a total sycophant. Imagine what THAT interview would have been like if Gates had had to content with the guy Robert had to contend with last night.

  • littleguru

    Thanks. Let's see how Scoble looks like...

    Edit: Who is this older guy in the interview? He seems to see everything very negative.

  • Rossj


    Interesting vid (I'm watching now).

    Bill G should be answering this chap, not Robert - no offense Robert.

  • blowdart

    W3bbo wrote:
    I asked Adam if he could put this up on the C9 videos section, but he went AFK.


    I would hope he wouldn't, as you aren't allowed to distribute it anyway. And you *know* that.

  • System

    littleguru wrote:
    Who is this older guy in the interview? He seems to see everything very negative.


    Stelzer is an economist who is a director at the Hudson Institute. He also writes a decent column in the Sunday Times. You're right, he doesnt appear to be a fan of Bill does he.

  • Rossj

    anon wrote:
    
    littleguru wrote:Who is this older guy in the interview? He seems to see everything very negative.


    Stelzer is an economist who is a director at the Hudson Institute. He also writes a decent column in the Sunday Times. You're right, he doesnt appear to be a fan of Bill does he.


    Not likely to be very interesting to watch if it was just a BG love-fest would it?

  • irascian

    anon wrote:
    Stelzer is an economist who is a director at the Hudson Institute. He also writes a decent column in the Sunday Times. You're right, he doesnt appear to be a fan of Bill does he.


    His memory is just a lot longer than most here who prefer to think of "cuddly" Bill in a cardigan running his "trying to be more open" company.

    I'm not going to bore anybody with endless stories of how Microsoft has used and abused its monopoly power in the past to crush other firms, steal their intellectual property etc etc. The bundling of a free browser to kill Netscape is the most oft-quoted example, but is a tiny tip on a very large iceberg.

    That's unfortunately the nature of humans and business, and anybody who thinks the competitors whingeing in self-righteous indignation about it would do any different if they hadn't been in the same position probably believes in the tooth fairy too.

    Whenever I see "cuddly" Bill and see silly nostalgic postings for a person that didn't exist outside what we've been "sold" I remember the countless anecdotes of how rude, foul-mouthed and just plain obnoxious he could be in reviews. When I was a kid I was appalled at a saying my mother had about there never having been such a thing as a "nice successful businessman". Now I realise she's right: "Nice" and "successful" are oxymorons. The best you can hope for is that they have a bit of a conscience so that as retirement looms they feel more and more guilty about what they've done and how they've done it and start trying to make recompense, either through philanthropic work or through just being plain nice to people for a change (I can think of several ruthless sales executives who've turned into sweethearts once they've retired).

    There's an amusing (and favourable - such is the power of "power") anecdote about Bill over on Joel Spolsky's blog that's worth a read if you're in the mood. 

  • Angus

    Thanks for this W3bbo. That seemed like a pretty tough interview, a warm up for his 'leaving interview' for Channel 9? Tongue Out

    Was this the Newsnight on Friday 16th June, at 10:30 pm on BBC2?

    Angus Higgins

  • System

    irascian wrote:
     
    His memory is just a lot longer than most here who prefer to think of "cuddly" Bill in a cardigan running his "trying to be more open" company.


    My memory is just as good. Saying Stelzer doesn’t like Gates was not me saying I see him as this cuddly person. He is a ruthless, obnoxious, money hungry, driven man and that is the reason I respect him. If you have an idea, you have to do all that you can to make it a success. If that means clawing your way up the ladder, and once you have ascended to the top, stomping on other companies & people to remain at the top, so be it. I would also do anything to remain numero uno, wouldn’t you?

    In the interview Stelzer clearly points out, that although Bill has changed the world, he doesn’t agree with the way he went about it. In my opinion, I think Bills way is the only way. Let’s face it; the only way to become successful is to smash everyone else out of the way.

    Im a nice guy, a friendly guy... but when it comes to business, nice guys always finish last.

  • irascian

    anon wrote:
    I would also do anything to remain numero uno, wouldn’t you?


    Erm no!

    I like to be able to look myself in the mirror each morning. That being said, being "nice" hasn't been a hindrance in the IT contracting world and I doubt I'd have been any more "successful" (by my definition) even if I had been a little more ruthless with customers I've got. But then that's a different market and I've had no interest in being "numero uno". Too often it equates with "humourless, arrogant, obnoxious jerk" and while I can easily be those things it's something I would prefer to let simmer rather than encourage!

    Funny things is that during my brief stint in the music world yeah, I think I could have become a lot more "powerful" and  made a LOT more money if I'd been more ruthless and been more of a suck-up to people like Simon Cowell and more of a back stabber to those who helped me achieve my limited success. At the time I was just glad I'd turned a hobby into 'my day job', albeit only for 3 or 4 years before deciding I'd prefer to go back to something more sane.

    Incidentally Cowell is just one of the people I had some dealings with in the days when he was "just" an A&R (contractor) man working for RCA. His only "talent" was to take every Top 10 TV show theme and turn it into a dance track or sign up pretty soap actors to mime to karaoke cover versions that session musicians recorded for pittance fees. He's probably the exception to my rules about "success" - he was far more obnoxious then than he is now he's made his millions with the moronic "Pop Idol"/"X-factor" - success seems to have softened his egomania, arrogance and general contempt for other human beings if recent TV performances can be believed.

  • Cyonix

    anon wrote:
    Im a nice guy, a friendly guy... but when it comes to business, nice guys always finish last.


    Nah, the people that finish last are the people that try to not be nice so that they can emulate what they think a good business person is.

    Not only are these people not nice... they also look stupid.

  • W3bbo

    irascian wrote:
    When I was a kid I was appalled at a saying my mother had about there never having been such a thing as a "nice successful businessman". Now I realise she's right: "Nice" and "successful" are oxymorons. The best you can hope for is that they have a bit of a conscience so that as retirement looms they feel more and more guilty about what they've done and how they've done it and start trying to make recompense, either through philanthropic work or through just being plain nice to people for a change (I can think of several ruthless sales executives who've turned into sweethearts once they've retired)


    Not necessarily, Google is the opposite.

    They're successful, and originally weren't evil. But as time goes on, their "amount of success" as decreased (a bit) and they're becoming less ethical.

  • System

    irascian wrote:
    That being said, being "nice" hasn't been a hindrance in the IT contracting world and I doubt I'd have been any more "successful" (by my definition) even if I had been a little more ruthless with customers I've got.



    Its a fine line. Where do you stop being a nice guy with a passion, and become ruthless jerk?

    I don't think that 'screw everyone over' attitude works for everyone. I for one don't behave like that. You're right, it probably wouldn't of helped much it you had behaved like that.

    I think though, if you have an original idea, in this competitive market, and you want to make it to the top, and have the power, fame, fortune, then you need to be that kind of business man. The one who does embrace the 'screw you' attitude.

    Im not saying either mentality is right or wrong, just different and suitable to different needs.

    When did Bill Gates stop being that passionate team playing dev who had a passion for software, and become the money hungry, power mad, fame chasing manager, who has a passion for software?

    A fine line indeed.

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