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Where are all of the good VB.NET video tutorials? :)

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  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    It seems like everybody makes their video tutorials in C languages...where are the visual basic.net tutorials? And Rory's don't count, their on Windows Mobile Smiley

    How about a "beginning game programming in vb.net" Smiley

    I'm such a newb, I need guidance! Smiley

  • User profile image
    out180

    Bob over at http://learnvisualstudio.net does all of his in both VB and C#.  His videos are pretty good.

    He also has a set of free ones on Web development in both C# and VB on the Web Developer Express page on MSDN.

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    I was looking for free tutorials, but after seeing the list that "Bob" offers, and the fact that a "lifetime" subscription is only $100 - I'm probably going to go went that route Smiley

    But! If anybody knows of any good, and free, VB.NET tutorials (videos), then shoot the link my way Wink

  • User profile image
    out180

    jsampsonPC wrote:
    I was looking for free tutorials, but after seeing the list that "Bob" offers, and the fact that a "lifetime" subscription is only $100 - I'm probably going to go went that route

    But! If anybody knows of any good, and free, VB.NET tutorials (videos), then shoot the link my way


    Ah, but you didn't ask for free, just tutorials.  Smiley  It's a good set of videos so I doubt you'll be sorry.

    The Web Express videos I mentioned are free however.

    There are some jems on MSDN Webcasts as well.  You have to do some digging through their "less than flexable" interface/search but they are in there.

    There used to be a great series by Joe Hummel (DevelopMentor) on Modern Software Development that was in VB.  It, like a lot of things, has been eaten by the big bad MSDN machine and for the life of me I can't find it now.  It was a couple years old however.  Probably time to retire it.

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    I appreciate the input Smiley Thanks. I purchased my lifetime membership to learnvisualstudio.net, and I have already downloaded all of the videos. Browsing through the titles, I feel I made a great purchase Smiley

    Oh, about Joe Hummel - Found His Link...
    You gotta scroll down for the VB.NET section.

  • User profile image
    Human​Compiler

    When I did some book writing, the publisher I talked with said their statistics showed that more tech books purchased were VB.NET books.  So the theory is that if there aren't a ton of C# books bought, then they must be online reading.  Which would lead me to believe that there are less VB programmers reading/watching stuff online.  Maybe someone should turn the tables.  Sounds like an opportunity to me.  Either that or you're just going to have to go buy some books.  Tongue Out

  • User profile image
    Duncanma

    Hmm... when you did some book writing, eh? Smiley

    In my experience, and I feel a bit torn saying this, being a VB guy through and through... higher end .NET developers tend to read/write C#... I'm not sure I can say why, but my theory was that C# was the new hot thing when .NET was first launched and if you jumped in right at the beginning there was a lot of reason to go with C#.  I was writing a VB.NET book during the alpha of .NET 1.0 and C# certainly appeared to more stable... that difference went away by launch, but I think all the "developmentor" type folks out there were diving into .NET from the earliest releases... so they ended up with C#...

    Of course there was also a lot of folks who just wanted to use something that was more java-like and more C++ like... and the age-old perception that VB is not for true Comp Sci experts...

    For me, I saw VB.NET 1.0 in alpha form and I was astounded it was everything I loved about VB plus it appeared to have removed all the limitations that used to force me to build portions of my apps in C++ ... After the alpha I wrote a ton of articles for MSDN, each and every one of them using VB.NET ... Definitely my language of choice.

    I still feel that way, but Channel 9 and on10.net are written in C#... so I spend all day coding in C# instead (and it is just peachy... it just wouldn't have been my first choice).

    Now, back to books... I was actually told by a publisher that by the .NET 2.0 timeframe C# books were outselling VB.NET books on advanced topics (The "essentials" series from AW was the example used at the time), but it wasn't a large difference. Either way, it didn't change what I wanted to write, but I did start to realize that if you weren't doing a language book (learn VB in x days! vs. ADO.NET or ClickOnce) that you probably need to provide all your code in both VB.NET and C#. I believe that is still true, both languages have a large audience.

    Any VB programmrs here who see a great video tutorial in only C# should really complain to MSDN or to whoever published the video... In many cases the C# video would still be useful to you, but if Microsoft publishes it then it should probably be a single video that covers samples in both languages or more than one version should be made available!

  • User profile image
    RamblingGeek​UK

    jsampsonPC wrote:
    It seems like everybody makes their video tutorials in C languages...where are the visual basic.net tutorials? And Rory's don't count, their on Windows Mobile

    How about a "beginning game programming in vb.net"

    I'm such a newb, I need guidance!


    Hi Jsampson,

    I feel your pain, I'm willing to help any time (if I can), I've found this site real useful http://www.learnvisualstudio.com/ and it doesn't cost a great deal either.

  • User profile image
    Ang3lFir3

    Duncanma wrote:
    Any VB programmrs here who see a great video tutorial in only C# should really complain to MSDN or to whoever published the video... In many cases the C# video would still be useful to you, but if Microsoft publishes it then it should probably be a single video that covers samples in both languages or more than one version should be made available!


    They usually are still useful.... one thing I have noticed is that many VB devs (like myself) can still read and write C# just fine.... it's a concious choice to actaully write in VB not one of limitation. Glad to hear more softies speak up about their feelings for VB (especially those like Duncan and HC)

    I'm wondering what it is you think I should do when a Team's SDK doesn't include VB templates. I created my own from the C# version but there seems to still be a few minor differences that I am not sure about. The team has said there won't be a VB template For their project type in the SDK which I find to be almost insulting.

    Hopefully the remaining miss conceptions about VB devs will continue to go away. Personally I'm not a fan of {}and ; (hated it when i wrote Java too) and VB is just more readable to me.

    out180- Good stuff... Think we might look at grabbing a subscription.... always loved his vids on MSDN and I see a few things on there I might even wanna take a look at.... be good for our junior devs too.

  • User profile image
    out180

    jsampsonPC wrote:
    I appreciate the input Thanks. I purchased my lifetime membership to learnvisualstudio.net, and I have already downloaded all of the videos. Browsing through the titles, I feel I made a great purchase

    Oh, about Joe Hummel - Found His Link...
    You gotta scroll down for the VB.NET section.


    Thanks for that.  I tell ya, I really did search for them, I promise.  Regardless you found them.  He produces some good material.

  • User profile image
    out180

    Ang3lFir3 wrote:
    
    Duncanma wrote: ...


    ...

    out180- Good stuff... Think we might look at grabbing a subscription.... always loved his vids on MSDN and I see a few things on there I might even wanna take a look at.... be good for our junior devs too.


    I'm glad you found it useful.  A lot of the vids on learnvisualstudio.net I force on junior devs just like you mentioned.  There's a couple MSDN webcasts that I have them watch as well.  Joe Hummel and Brad Abrams both has a good series on proper class design.

  • User profile image
    out180

    Duncanma wrote:
    Hmm... when you did some book writing, eh?

    In my experience, and I feel a bit torn saying this, being a VB guy through and through... higher end .NET developers tend to read/write C#... I'm not sure I can say why, but my theory was that C# was the new hot thing when .NET was first launched and if you jumped in right at the beginning there was a lot of reason to go with C#.  I was writing a VB.NET book during the alpha of .NET 1.0 and C# certainly appeared to more stable... that difference went away by launch, but I think all the "developmentor" type folks out there were diving into .NET from the earliest releases... so they ended up with C#...

    Of course there was also a lot of folks who just wanted to use something that was more java-like and more C++ like... and the age-old perception that VB is not for true Comp Sci experts...

    For me, I saw VB.NET 1.0 in alpha form and I was astounded it was everything I loved about VB plus it appeared to have removed all the limitations that used to force me to build portions of my apps in C++ ... After the alpha I wrote a ton of articles for MSDN, each and every one of them using VB.NET ... Definitely my language of choice.

    I still feel that way, but Channel 9 and on10.net are written in C#... so I spend all day coding in C# instead (and it is just peachy... it just wouldn't have been my first choice).

    Now, back to books... I was actually told by a publisher that by the .NET 2.0 timeframe C# books were outselling VB.NET books on advanced topics (The "essentials" series from AW was the example used at the time), but it wasn't a large difference. Either way, it didn't change what I wanted to write, but I did start to realize that if you weren't doing a language book (learn VB in x days! vs. ADO.NET or ClickOnce) that you probably need to provide all your code in both VB.NET and C#. I believe that is still true, both languages have a large audience.

    Any VB programmrs here who see a great video tutorial in only C# should really complain to MSDN or to whoever published the video... In many cases the C# video would still be useful to you, but if Microsoft publishes it then it should probably be a single video that covers samples in both languages or more than one version should be made available!


    *sigh*  I wish I was bouncing between samples in VB or C#.  My books sample's are in VBScript and Perl. Tongue Out  Perl mostly, it has a special place in my heart. </shamelessplug>

  • User profile image
    jsampsonPC

    Kryptos wrote:
    
    jsampsonPC wrote:It seems like everybody makes their video tutorials in C languages...where are the visual basic.net tutorials? And Rory's don't count, their on Windows Mobile

    How about a "beginning game programming in vb.net"

    I'm such a newb, I need guidance!


    Hi Jsampson,

    I feel your pain, I'm willing to help any time (if I can), I've found this site real useful http://www.learnvisualstudio.com/ and it doesn't cost a great deal either.



    You missed one of my previous posts Smiley In this very thread, a little before you posted, I had stated that I went ahead and purchased the lifetime membership Smiley

    It was a GREAT deal! Plus, "Bob", the creator of the videos encourages "Sharing", to get word out about his site.

    Jonathan

  • User profile image
    figuerres

    Duncanma wrote:
    Hmm... when you did some book writing, eh?

    In my experience, and I feel a bit torn saying this, being a VB guy through and through... higher end .NET developers tend to read/write C#... I'm not sure I can say why, but my theory was that C# was the new hot thing when .NET was first launched and if you jumped in right at the beginning there was a lot of reason to go with C#.  I was writing a VB.NET book during the alpha of .NET 1.0 and C# certainly appeared to more stable... that difference went away by launch, but I think all the "developmentor" type folks out there were diving into .NET from the earliest releases... so they ended up with C#...

    Of course there was also a lot of folks who just wanted to use something that was more java-like and more C++ like... and the age-old perception that VB is not for true Comp Sci experts...

    For me, I saw VB.NET 1.0 in alpha form and I was astounded it was everything I loved about VB plus it appeared to have removed all the limitations that used to force me to build portions of my apps in C++ ... After the alpha I wrote a ton of articles for MSDN, each and every one of them using VB.NET ... Definitely my language of choice.

    I still feel that way, but Channel 9 and on10.net are written in C#... so I spend all day coding in C# instead (and it is just peachy... it just wouldn't have been my first choice).

    Now, back to books... I was actually told by a publisher that by the .NET 2.0 timeframe C# books were outselling VB.NET books on advanced topics (The "essentials" series from AW was the example used at the time), but it wasn't a large difference. Either way, it didn't change what I wanted to write, but I did start to realize that if you weren't doing a language book (learn VB in x days! vs. ADO.NET or ClickOnce) that you probably need to provide all your code in both VB.NET and C#. I believe that is still true, both languages have a large audience.

    Any VB programmrs here who see a great video tutorial in only C# should really complain to MSDN or to whoever published the video... In many cases the C# video would still be useful to you, but if Microsoft publishes it then it should probably be a single video that covers samples in both languages or more than one version should be made available!



    IMHO several things have happened:

    the chnage from Vb6 to VB.net seems to have created a lot of FUD in different groups.

    the idea that many folks have that "Basic" is a toy and real programmers use C/C++ / Java and that C# is part of that.

    and the first wave of stuff for .Net tending to favor C#

    and the way that C# has all the "standards" stuff like C does
    but VB is kind of a MSFT pet -- where is there a Gramar for VB.Net for example?

    between each of the things I listed is the "push" by folks who do not really know software to ask for "real Programmers" this turns into a demand for C# over VB and this has folks then following one of a few tends:

    a)  they know VB6, they have clients with VB6 apps and they get paid to maintain them -- and they never jump to .Net till they have no choice.
    b)  they know C and other languages and can switch so they do, gets them more work so they follow the $$$$

    so I really hat to say this but I think it's true:

    VB.Net will take years to be accepted in the main stream.

    just like VB first took time for adoption.

    I like what was done with VB.Net --

    I just think the shock of the change was a big setback for it.

    also the # of Java coders and C++ coders who could jump to C# also made it the big winner at the start....





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