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Gartner: Ignore Longhorn and Stick with XP SP2

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  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    This really sucks that Gartner is suggesting this to everyone but I have an idea for the MS guys, why not just go ahead and make a list of all the new features that will be in Longhorn.  This way it will ease customers mind of why its worth upgrading.The article is here

  • User profile image
    lars

    How the heck can Gartner have an opinion on how good Longhorn is going to be two years before the product is even released? Does anyone trust and listen to these guys?

  • User profile image
    fdezjose

    Some people understood the decision of not including WinFS in the initial Longhorn release as if WinFS would never exist. Come on people, when Longhorn get release in 2006 WinFS will be in a beta stage and as far as a year (let's hope) WinFS will be ready to ship in Longhorn. And I don't think that the removal of WinFS will make Longhorn more of an evolution from Windows XP rather than the revolution, (...yeah WinFS was a big thing but ,let's hope, we will be able to enjoy it in 2007) Longhorn still has two big pillars Indigo and of course Avalon.     

  • User profile image
    Keskos

    rjdohnert wrote:
    This really sucks that Gartner is suggesting this to everyone but I have an idea for the MS guys, why not just go ahead and make a list of all the new features that will be in Longhorn.  This way it will ease customers mind of why its worth upgrading.The article is here


    Well Gartner and some other guys talk * sometimes, but on the other hand if you were in their position you would be a little more critical than you are now.

    For example, although the applications I have seen so far look promising, we still can not conclusively say whether Longhorn is a necessary upgrade for businesses. Justifying the upgrade will involve productivity gain for businesses. For real productivity gains, you need to look at features and applications that can take advantage of those new features to boost productivity.


  • User profile image
    Heywood_J

    rjdohnert wrote:
    why not just go ahead and make a list of all the new features that will be in Longhorn. 


    XP comes with a text editor. It sucks so I use something else.
    XP comes with a graphics (bitmap) editor.  It is less than worthless so I use something else.
    XP can burn CDs.  This "feature" is clunky and clumsy so I use someting else.
    XP comes with a web browser and e-mail client.  They are so full of easily exploitable secrurity flaws that I use something else.

    Are we starting to see a pattern here?

    Connect a computer running unpatched XP to a broadband connection, and on average, it will be compromised in 20 minutes.

    Features?  What features?  Before you go adding more "features" to Longhorn, let's fix the existing problems first.


  • User profile image
    themaffeo

    Two years is an eternity in our world.  I'm not going to condemn a product to the same fate as Windows ME before I get a chance to put my grubby hands on it.   The true question is how well will Longhorn fit the business climate in two years, not now.

  • User profile image
    iStation

    We may need a sort of risk management for Longhorn...
    Sad

  • User profile image
    Varsity

    Heywood_J wrote:
    Features?  What features?  Before you go adding more "features" to Longhorn, let's fix the existing problems first.
    It's a problem that the free (as in, at no additional cost) software is inferior to dedicated solutions with entire divions behind them? It's a problem that Windows is the largest target and will thus always have people finding exploits in it, no matter how secure?

    OK, that second one is a problem, but not one that can ever be fixed until someone else takes over from MS. Bottom line is that what you expect isn't possible or reasonable.

  • User profile image
    Jeremy W

    Heywood_J wrote:
    rjdohnert wrote: why not just go ahead and make a list of all the new features that will be in Longhorn. 


    XP comes with a text editor. It sucks so I use something else.
    XP comes with a graphics (bitmap) editor.  It is less than worthless so I use something else.
    XP can burn CDs.  This "feature" is clunky and clumsy so I use someting else.
    XP comes with a web browser and e-mail client.  They are so full of easily exploitable secrurity flaws that I use something else.

    Are we starting to see a pattern here?

    Connect a computer running unpatched XP to a broadband connection, and on average, it will be compromised in 20 minutes.

    Features?  What features?  Before you go adding more "features" to Longhorn, let's fix the existing problems first.




    Heywood,

    It's called making features as "floors" not "ceilings". A floor is the minimum requirement to make something work. A ceiling is the ideal solution for every consumer.

    Rarely does Microsoft bundle things in that are ceilings. They are too much of a target. But bundling in floors is not a problem at all because no vendors feel threatened. In fact, it wakes consumers up to the possibilities and they then go looking for the "real deal".

    Also, time to penetration has been falling and is at an average of less than an hour for every OS out there with the exception of the funky high end ones like VMS and AIX. Is 20 minutes that much worse than an hour? I guess but in reality you're compromised either way... "On average".

    And as far as fixing existing issues... I thought they did that with XP SP2?

  • User profile image
    Sabot

    I have a few points to raise here,

    Point 1,

    Yep so the text editor or the graphics editor or even the CD burning software isn't as good or feature rich as commercial products, well isn't that good for the market as a whole that the concept is brought to the attention of the 'potential' customer and is better with their product.

    Look no further than the disk defrag. Executive Software I bet have sold far more copies of disk-keeper because of the inclusion of a cut-down version in XP.

    Point 2,

    what if I want to simply edit a txt document and I didn't want to buy an editor. Do you remember the DOS days with the 'copy con' command. Having a text editor such as NotePad means I can from one machine to another and know it has an text editor, simple yes, consist yes, feature rich? NO ... but notepad has most of the features I'm mostly likely to use.


    As for Longhorn, I can't wait !!!!!!

    Why feature such as Indigo, I really want, stuff WinFX, wasn't keen on that feature and I'm happier it's been dropped. Other features such as XAML will also be extremely useful.

    Gartner examines the industry and business drivers and makes recommendation based on the growing needs of a business and they do this by performing surveys, then analysis to try and determine the underlying trends. But it's not perfect. Why because of the human factors we all know and love, that are dead hard to predict.

    Everyone likes a new shiny piece of Kit, Longhorn will be no exception, so their is the desire factor there.

    Secondly, as the feature list becomes more know and we see demos and our imaginations start getting caught up and us techies can see the benefits to our productivity we are going to be selling this time and time and time again to the people that spend the cash, till eventually we get it.

    If I.T. decisions were really based all on business needs then we would still be all on Windows 95. Trust me, I work for a company that has just migrated from Windows 95 and OS2 to Windows XP !

    Trust me, Longhorn is going to be huge ... I could bet money on it.

  • User profile image
    ScanIAm

    rjdohnert wrote:
    This really sucks that Gartner is suggesting this to everyone but I have an idea for the MS guys, why not just go ahead and make a list of all the new features that will be in Longhorn.  This way it will ease customers mind of why its worth upgrading.The article is here


    I didn't check with Gartner on my last OS purchase and I don't expect that I'll start doing so now.  It seems, to me, akin to reading People Magazine for tech opinions: 

    It may be fun and entertaining, but at the end of the day, you are more dumberer.

  • User profile image
    Sven Groot

    Sabot wrote:
    Point 2,

    what if I want to simply edit a txt document and I didn't want to buy an editor. Do you remember the DOS days with the 'copy con' command. Having a text editor such as NotePad means I can from one machine to another and know it has an text editor, simple yes, consist yes, feature rich? NO ... but notepad has most of the features I'm mostly likely to use.

    This is true. It also makes things more convenient for than is currently the case with the *nix hegemony. If I go to a Linux box and want a text editor, what do I do? I have no alternative than to start checking which one is installed. Emacs? No, hmm, okay, nedit then? Also no, kedit perhaps? Damn, still no go. What, only vi? NOOOOOOOOOO!! (Okay, maybe I went a little overboard there Smiley.

    (Of course, there is always the solution for true geeks... although that begs the question what he was going to use to write that editor, cat or something?)

  • User profile image
    thechris

    yeah, i hate emacs... never found out how to get to the pseudo-gui menus...  could not save or quit...

    vi/vim is kinda neat, but not intuitive...

    still, most linux distros should have kedit or gedit, depedning on if the distro likes gnome or kde more.  I like having more choices in linux -- in windows its notepad.  you can't replace notepad either.  you can add a new editor, but not replace notepad...

    but most users don't care. 


  • User profile image
    manickernel

    vi is like broccoli, you don't like it at all the first time, but eventually you get to love it. With Unix Services being a free add-on for windows, including PERL, give it a try. Ultimately you will love it.

  • User profile image
    Shining Arcanine

    Ironically a company that a family member works for is doing the opposite. They're ignoring SP2 and waiting for Longhorn.

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