Anyone here used Borland's Delphi 8 for .NET?

I do.

VCL Forms, for example, often lets you migrate Delphi apps to .NET with the addition of one line of code.

Never heard of this. Which line would that be?

Actually, you may be able to re-compile existing apps without a single line of new code, but as soon as you app is more than a few VCL components dropped on a form, it's not that easy (Pointers, Windows API, and some not yet ported VCL components).

The problem? Pascal. Just, argh, I can't stand writing:

I's the other way round for me - I hate { }, and love the nice and clean style of begin-end blocks. And (at least on a german keyboard), I can write begin faster than reaching to the { and have to re-position my fingers.

Views of the crew and fellow Channel 9 plebs, gratefully received Wink

All in all, I like Delphi 8, it's a step in the right direction, and the Delphi language got some very nice improvements (e.g. operator overloading).

However, there's still lot's of stuff that needs to be improved. What I dislike in particular:

* IDE: The new Galileo IDE is a VS.NET clone. Nothing against Visual Studio, but I liked the old Delphi IDE a lot more. There is a classic style, but it's not the same.

* Stability: Also Delphi 8 got alsready 2 updates (Delphi 7 got none), it's still a bit crashy. VCL.NET / WinForms development works pretty good, but APS.NET is buggy, and I didn't manged to compile an non-executable assembly without getting a compiler access violation.

For Delphi guys it'll be great, but I don't see a lot of value in it for Visual Studio developers.

Of course, if you want to develop in Visual Studio, you shouldn't buy Delphi - just because it's Delphi and not VS. But, if you don't mind learning a new language, Delphi may give you some advantages over VS.NET. The most important argument is VCL.NET, which is IMHO a much better framework. See

http://www.lemanix.com/lemanix/lemanixisapi.dll/Entry?ID=1167

http://bdn.borland.com/article/0,1410,31983,00.html