Coffeehouse Thread

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  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    Well my interim contract with Verizon expires on August 12.  Verizon told me they are not going to renew the contract.  But, they said it did not reflect on my  work, that I was one of the more professional guys that worked for them, they let me do hiring and a lot of stuff that was above and beyond what was in my contract.  I turned down a couple of jobs  that I was offered because I was under the impression they were going to go long term but alas they didnt.

    Have you guys ever been in a position where an employer said you did a great job but declined to renew your contract.

  • User profile image
    Ang3lFir3

    depending on the contracting scenario (through yourself or an agency) there may be decisions that as of yet have not come to light.

    I have experienced situations where when i was working for a contracting service that the employer did not want to pay the hiring fees associated with making a contractor a permenant employee. Of course I can't be sure if this is your case or not, but it may be possible. Often times they may later seek out to employ you if for any reason you are still available at that time and they are not under any further legal obligations to the contracting firm.

    Kinda depressing to be hiring folks only to find yourself out of a contract. Hopefully you won't have any trouble locating another contract  quickly, If you choose to.

  • User profile image
    Detroit Muscle

    This is one of the many reasons I don't do contract work.

  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    Yep I told the kids until I get new work we could only do the essentials like Food, Electricity, High Speed Internet.  Luckily Im a saver so I can actually live for awhile without work.

  • User profile image
    Red5

    Next time, don't turn down the good job.
    You can ALWAYS use it as leverage if you really want to stay where you are at.  If it doesn't work out at the current employer, you now have a new contract to start work on.

    Lather. Rinse. Repeat.

    Remember, THERE IS NO SUCH THING AS JOB SECURITY.
    Loyalty is an admirable trait (and I live by it BTW), but at the end of the day, you have to look out for No. 1; and No. 2, 3, 4 and 5 in my case.

    Just don't step in No. 2

  • User profile image
    Minh

    Ask if they're willing to be a profession reference. Their answer will tell how you did.

  • User profile image
    rjdohnert

    I already asked that and my boss today when he informed me they wouldnt be renewing the contract told me that i could use him as a reference anytime and he even gave me a lead to a company thats hiring.  My daughter thinks I should start my own company.
      Which has been something I have been contemplating for awhile anyway.

    She also offered up to help with the child support money her mom sends but Im not in that dire straits that I need to close down her college fund or take money from my kids.

    Minh wrote:
    Ask if they're willing to be a profession reference. Their answer will tell how you did.

  • User profile image
    irascian

    rjdohnert wrote:


    Have you guys ever been in a position where an employer said you did a great job but declined to renew your contract.



    That's the nature of contracting. When I was at one large motor company the head of the department had made a wise crack to the effect that when I left they'd be asking me to turn out the lights on my way out because I'd be the last one out the door. Not long after that I was looking for new work. We're used to fill a gap and when a company has to tighten its belt then someone has to go - it will always be the contractor.

    18 months back I took on a 3 month contract and was told pretty much what you were told in the last few weeks. I was a bit down because I thought having such a short contract that wasn't renewed would look bad on my CV. As it happened on my very last day they won some new business and I was renewed for a six month contract. More than a year later I'm still there. That's just the nature of the business and the situations under which contractors are taken on.

    Other niner round here, who I greatly respect, was talking  a while back about going back to being a permie because "there's too much down time". That's one of the things you need to take into account before rushing into contracting thinking you're going to make pots of gold. Contracting is all about taking risks, and having enough belief in your talents and the marketplace to take those risks.

  • User profile image
    irascian

    Duplicate post deleted!

  • User profile image
    amotif

    irascian wrote:
    That's one of the things you need to take into account before rushing into contracting thinking you're going to make pots of gold. Contracting is all about taking risks, and having enough belief in your talents and the marketplace to take those risks.


    Well put & agreed.

  • User profile image
    JohnAskew

    amotif wrote:
    
    irascian wrote: That's one of the things you need to take into account before rushing into contracting thinking you're going to make pots of gold. Contracting is all about taking risks, and having enough belief in your talents and the marketplace to take those risks.


    Well put & agreed.



    Mobility makes contracting much more attractive. Raising a family doesn't fit so well unless you live in a large metropolitan area.

    Stay very busy, there's trees to shake nearby.

  • User profile image
    Rossj

    irascian wrote:
    there's too much down time"


    The exact reason I entered contracting myself.  With two young kids there is no way that I am going to do the 16-20 hour days that I did when I was younger, I'd much rather spend time with my kids during the 'down-time'. They are only young once.

    irascian wrote:
    
    That's one of the things you need to take into account before rushing into contracting thinking you're going to make pots of gold.


    Spot on - people often complain about how much money contractors charge, I would guess your employer might pay the same if you agreed to be the first to go should the need arise, and to be on essentially no notice period.  I actually make less as a contractor than I did as a permie, but that is essentially because of my other point - the big holidays.

    As an aside, I've been on my current contract about a month, due to finish in Sept and I've already been extended ... so I don't need to worry about Christmas now .. phew.

  • User profile image
    Tensor

    Having been at the contracting game fro a whole three months now, one thing I can say is that you have to learn a lot, quickly. I think I still ahve a lot to learn... but on the other hand I am half way in and have also been offered an extension, which is nice.

    I am slightly worried by the, erm, how do i put this, code quality, of some of my fellow contractors. I came accros some a truely daily wtf worthy stuff yesterday.

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