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Windows and VPNs - How do I do it?

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  • User profile image
    alwaysmc2

    PerfectPhase wrote:
    
    alwaysmc2 wrote:
    
    ZippyV wrote:
    I don't get this: Windows supports vpn connections but we still have to install another vpn client. Why?

    So how would I go about setting up a VPN between my home computer an a random computer at my school then?


    The VPN client in windows is fine, much better than that Cisco POS IMO.

    Give us some more details if you want an answer, what OS is each, which direction do you want the connection (connect to home from school etc) are there any firewalls/NAT routers in the way and so on?
    [link]
    From a school computer, I would like to be able to connect to my home PC to have access to my home files.

    I have both XP SP2 Pro and Vista RC1 installed on my computer, so it would be really nice if you guys would tell me how to do it with both. 
    I'd use Hamachi, but I don't have install privlages on most computers in the school, and besides that the hard drives get reset every time the computers are restarted.

  • User profile image
    Cyonix

    You need the privileges to set one up. If your able to obtain the privileges just setup the VPN server at home (perhaps OpenVPN) on a port that is most likely open.. such as 53, 80, etc. Then install the client software and connect.

    btw this will hurt your poor school network administrator.. as it will open a hole in his network he will not know about, but if you are able to get privileges then i'd be guessing that would be the least of his worries.

    When i was at school some friends and i made a tunnel through SSH and netcat so we could access forums, MSN and IRC.

  • User profile image
    aspnix

    What I usually do from school is RDP from their PCs to my home PC...

  • User profile image
    alwaysmc2

    aspnix wrote:
    What I usually do from school is RDP from their PCs to my home PC...

    I may just do that.
    I could just set up port forwarding in my router, and set up a DynDNS account so that I don't have to remember my IP address.  That actually seems like the best solution.

    However, Windows has a VPN service built right in.  I bet that would be a very good solution, but I don't know how to use it. Perplexed

  • User profile image
    W3bbo

    aspnix wrote:
    What I usually do from school is RDP from their PCs to my home PC...


    I only do that when I'm sure the client is safe, check for key-loggers, for example. Hence the need for a good two-factor authentication implementation.

    The thing with accessing your workstation's desktop via RDP is it'll change everything around, your client's screen dimensions and resolutions (DPI etc) won't be the same, and when you return you'll see things messed around.

    It's a lot easier to invest in a LAN Domain Controller with Terminal Services (in Application Mode), that way it's designed to be used like that, and everything works perfectly (you can save power by shutting down your workstation too).

    There is a way to get OSK running during Winlogon (Windows XP TabletPC has this) which gives you partial immunity to key-loggers (since you can use the onscreen keyboard for at least part of your password.

    Watch out if your school's network uses desktop framebuffer monitoring, I got "found out" because I wasn't running Luna/Blue (I was running Classic/Pumpkin) so they instantly enlarged my screen's thumbnail to see I was on IRC at the time, not good. But since making my Terminal Services profile use Luna/Blue I haven't been spotted since)

  • User profile image
    alwaysmc2

    W3bbo wrote:
    Watch out if your school's network uses desktop framebuffer monitoring

    My school uses a program called "Vision", which does all that.  It'll even put the thumbnails on a little diagram of the room.
    From what I know about it, it also will show a list of programs open, but I'm not sure about a key logger.

    But anyway, I'm guessing there are at least 3,000 computers on the network (all of the individual school networks in the county are linked). So... I'll be hoping on security through obscurity.

    Plus, I don't see any problem with me using RDC.  Anything I do will most likely be school related, seeing as I could just get destracted on my laptop (once it gets back from the Geek Squad! [C])

  • User profile image
    SlackmasterK

    alwaysmc2 wrote:
    my laptop (once it gets back from the Geek Squad! )

    Zomg you went to Best Buy?  I'd let you get away with buying a laptop there, but for support?  I trust it was some sort of warranty-covered hardware issue?

  • User profile image
    Cannot​Resolve​Symbol

    alwaysmc2 wrote:
    
    W3bbo wrote: Watch out if your school's network uses desktop framebuffer monitoring

    My school uses a program called "Vision", which does all that.  It'll even put the thumbnails on a little diagram of the room.
    From what I know about it, it also will show a list of programs open, but I'm not sure about a key logger.

    But anyway, I'm guessing there are at least 3,000 computers on the network (all of the individual school networks in the county are linked). So... I'll be hoping on security through obscurity.

    Plus, I don't see any problem with me using RDC.  Anything I do will most likely be school related, seeing as I could just get destracted on my laptop (once it gets back from the Geek Squad! )


    At my former high school, all the computers in the county were linked (actually, all the computers in the state were linked-- each county had their own domain, though) and some people still got themselves busted for using an SSH tunnel to get through their proxy restrictions.  Make sure you're not violating anyhting you signed at the start of the year, or you may find yourself kicked off the computers for the rest of the year (which would be bad).

  • User profile image
    alwaysmc2

    SlackmasterK wrote:
    
    alwaysmc2 wrote: my laptop (once it gets back from the Geek Squad! )

    Zomg you went to Best Buy?  I'd let you get away with buying a laptop there, but for support?  I trust it was some sort of warranty-covered hardware issue?

    Yes.  The power port has a loose connection.  I believe that is because it was messed up by the power adapter they gave me as a replacement for the one that broke. Sad

    But on the bright side Virginia law states that if they have it for longer thatn 45 days Best Buy must give me a new laptop.  Only 11 more days to go! Big Smile *crosses fingers*

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